Vysotki - Seven Sisters, Moscow

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  • Kotelnicheskaya naberejnaya
    Kotelnicheskaya naberejnaya
    by kris-t
  • Kotelnicheskaya naberejnaya
    Kotelnicheskaya naberejnaya
    by kris-t
  • Moscow University
    Moscow University
    by kris-t
  • Ujamaflip's Profile Photo

    Seven Sisters

    by Ujamaflip Written Sep 14, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Moscow State University

    The Seven Sisters in Moscow consist of seven similiarly designed skyscrapers, built during the 1940's-50's under Stalin's instruction. They consist of:

    1. Moscow State University (Constructed mostly by German prisoners of war),
    2. Ukrainia Hotel (Tallest hotel in Europe, was tallest in world when completed, with over 1000 rooms)
    3. Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
    4. Kotelnicheskaya Naberezhnaya (Kotelniki Apartments)
    5. Red Gate Square (Ministry of Transport, other Administration and apartments),
    6. Leningradskaya Hotel,
    7. Kudrinskaya Square (Apartment block, containing 452 flats)

    The buildings are all impressive, it is worth while to visit some if you have the opportunity, to feel their dominance up close.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

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  • Pablos_new's Profile Photo

    "the Eighth Sister" - Triumph-Palace

    by Pablos_new Updated Jun 21, 2005

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    Maquette

    A couple of months ago construction of one more vysotka was completed near metro Sokol. This is block of elite flats called "Triumph-Palace". Now it is the tallest house in Moscow - 264,5 m. (And I guess in Europe! Commerzbank in Frankfurt is 257 m. Correct me if I am wrong). Next in Moscow is MSU building on Vorobjev hills - 240 m. "Triumph-Palace" is now in top 100 tallest buildings of the world (No.63) between Bocom Financial Towers, Shanghai and 120 Collins Street Melbourne pushing MSU one step lower to the position 126.


    Sorry, I have not jet taken a photo of it. This is a photo of the scale model from internet.

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  • Upstate1NY's Profile Photo

    Hotel Ukrainia, one of the seven sisters of Moscow

    by Upstate1NY Updated May 30, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hotel Ukrainia

    My guide assured me that this was as "grand" a hotel as Grand Hotel Europe in St. Petersburg. Unfortunately I did not have the oppertunity to go into the Ukrainia to verify that asserttion for myself. While in deed Grand Hotel Europe in SPB is "GRAND" in an "old world" style on the interior, it' s setting in the center of "downtown" St. Peteresburg where the buildings are barely distinguishable one from the next all in a row, the Ukrainia easily far surpasses GHE in as an "artistic" statement on the landscape.

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  • morgenhund's Profile Photo

    Stalin's wedding cakes

    by morgenhund Updated Oct 4, 2005

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    Kotelnicheskaya apartment block
    4 more images

    The Seven Sisters are one of the finer points of Stalinist rule. In 1947, foundations were laid for the Seven Sisters as part of the city of Moscow's 800th anniversary celebrations, and were aimed at bridging the "Skyscraper Gap". Now they dominate the skyline in Moscow, whilst still being very beautiful. The magnificent seven are:

    The Foreign Affairs Ministry (Smolenskaya-Sennaya pl. 32/34)
    Hotel Leningradskaya (ul. Kalanchevskaya 21/40)
    Hotel Ukraina (Kutuzovsky prospekt 2/1)
    Kotelnicheskaya apartment block (Kotelnicheskaya nab. 17/1)
    Kudrinskaya apartment block (Kudrinskaya ploshchad)
    Moscow State University (Universitetskaya pl. 1)
    Transport Ministry (ul. Sadovaya-Spasskaya)

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  • yumyum's Profile Photo

    2 more sisters

    by yumyum Updated Apr 9, 2006

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    Stalinist architecture you cannot escape and is worth seeing. The style of the seven sisters is unique although there are copies in Warshaw and Riga. It's worth going close to one, so you can really appreciate its dimensions.

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  • Canadienne's Profile Photo

    Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    by Canadienne Written Oct 23, 2003

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    Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    The Ministry of Foreign Affairs is one of seven skyscrapers that were erected during Stalin's rule. Due to their wedding cake appearance, they were nicknamed the Seven Sisters. We noticed at least three of them, from various points in the city, during our walks, but this one was the only one whose doorstep we reached.

    Construction of the building began in the 1930s and was completed in 1952. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Ministry of External Economic Links and the Ministry of the Russian Federation are located in the offices. Although we didn't go inside, it is worth checking out one of these Sisters up close, to get a good sense of their awesome dimensions (172 metres high).

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  • Pablos_new's Profile Photo

    Vysotka

    by Pablos_new Updated Mar 28, 2004

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    There are 7 tall buildings in Moscow built in 1950-s - so-called Stalin's Skyscrapers.

    1. Lomonosov Moscow State University
    2. Block of Flats on Kotelnecheskaya enbankment (on the photo)
    3. Block of Flats on Krasnaya Presnya
    4. Hotel "Lenindradskaya"
    5. Hotel "Ukraina"
    6. Ministry of Foreign Affairs
    7. Ministry of Transport

    All are worth to see, but first two in a list I consider to be masterpieces of architecture.

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  • yumyum's Profile Photo

    One of the seven sisters

    by yumyum Written Apr 9, 2006

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    When you stand next to these buildings, they are very impressive. They look different from the side or the front. These landmarks are easy to reach. This one is just outside Metro Barrikadnaya. But you first see it from the side, for this view you will have to walk along the street and round the corner.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    The high-rise building

    by kris-t Updated Nov 9, 2010

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    Krasnopresnenskaya
    4 more images

    Stalin did build seven other skyscrapers however, allegedly inspired by the Municipal Building in New York. They form a series of huge, cathedral-like structures with intricate exteriors, and are given various labels: 'The Seven Sisters', 'Stalinist Gothic', 'wedding cake architecture' and so on...

    One of 7 Moscow's high-rise buildings -
    on Kotel'nicheskaya is an apartment house - lots of actors live there

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  • ValbyDK's Profile Photo

    The Seven Sisters

    by ValbyDK Updated May 1, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Vysotki

    From one of the bridges crossing the Moscow River, we had a good view of the Moscow skyline. Some of the more notable buildings were the famous ‘Seven Sisters’ (Vysotki). They are skyscrapers built in the 1940s and 1950s, inspired from baroque Kremlin towers, gothic cathedrals, and American skyscrapers of the 1930s.

    Today the impressive buildings are used as apartment buildings (Kotelnicheskaya Naberezhnaya and Kudrinskaya Square), hotels (Hotel Ukraina and Hotel Leningrad, government buildings (the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Ministry of Heavy Industry), and the Moscow State University.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    The high-rise buildings

    by kris-t Updated Jul 29, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kotelnicheskaya naberejnaya
    4 more images

    Stalin did build seven other skyscrapers however, allegedly inspired by the Municipal Building in New York.

    They form a series of huge, cathedral-like structures with intricate exteriors and are given various labels: 'The Seven Sisters', 'Stalinist Gothic', 'wedding cake architecture' and so on.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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  • Kariba's Profile Photo

    Stalin Gothic

    by Kariba Written Mar 20, 2005

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    The Apartment Block at Kotelnicheskaya Nab.

    Love them or hate them, the seven gothic skyscrapers which dominate Moscows skyline are an integral part of the city's architectural heritage.

    Conceived by Stalin in the 30's, the buildings themselves were not all completed until 1953. Collectively known as Vysotniye Zdaniyes "high buildings" they also have the nickname "Seven Sisters" and were located at specific sites around the city to mark its boundaries.

    These include the Apartment Block at Kudrinskaya Square - Krasnaya Presnya, Moscow State University at Sparrow Hills, Ministry of Foreign Affairs - Smolenskaya Square, Hotel Ukraine - Kutuzovsky Boulevard, Administrative Building - Red Gate Square, Hotel Leningradskaya at Komsomolskaya Square and the Apartment Block at Kotelnicheskaya Embankment.

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  • Sharrie's Profile Photo

    Stalinist Gothic Architecture

    by Sharrie Written Dec 18, 2003

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    Ok, we have weddings in Moscow.
    We also have "wedding-cake" architecture here :-)

    Commonly known as that "wedding-cake" style, the Stalinist Gothic style of architecture can be found at key areas in Moscow. There are about 7 of them & I think I saw 3.

    Some of the most distinctive are those of the Foreign Ministry, the Moscow University & Hotel Ukraine.

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  • american_tourister's Profile Photo

    World's Ugliest Statue

    by american_tourister Updated Dec 21, 2004

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    What the hell is that?

    I saw this and just could not believe how tacky it is. I had to know how something so ugly could get built. I finally found a local who explained it to me. The story told to me goes something like this.

    The statue was built as a representation of Christopher Columbus and was offered to the USA by the communist government (CCCP) to commemorate the anniversary of Columbus "discovering" America.

    The Americans politely turned them down as the Russians would have expected this monstrosity to be erected ala' the Statue of Liberty.

    The Russians were incensed by the snub. The cut the head of Columbus off the statue and placed the head of Peter the Great instead. It was then erected on the banks of the Moskva river where it is now.

    It now commemorates the explorations sanctioned by Peter the Great. Now I'm not sure if this is all true but it would explain everything except tha fact that this thing is really horrible.

    Related to:
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    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

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  • Sioma's Profile Photo

    Moscow views (3) : Stalin's gothic

    by Sioma Updated Feb 29, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    stalin's gothic

    there are 7 similar buildings in different places of the city (they also are called "seven sisters")...such style is called "stalin's gothic".
    one of them is the Moscow University (MGU),
    two are hotels, two are the ministries of foreign affairs and of transportation, and the other two are blocks of private flats

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