Cathedrals and Churches, Saint Petersburg

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  • Cathedrals and Churches
    by Skillsbus
  • Cathedrals and Churches
    by Skillsbus
  • Along the colonnade
    Along the colonnade
    by grandmaR
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    St. John Monastery

    by Skillsbus Updated Jul 29, 2013

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    The Convent of St. John of Rila is the largest convent in St. Petersburg, Russia and the only stauropegic monastery in the region. It was established on the bank of the Karpovka River by Saint John of Kronstadt (1900) as a branch of the Sura Monastery of St. John the Baptist. The main pentacupolar church of the Twelve Apostles (1902) was built to a Neo-Byzantine design by Nikolay Nikonov. The ground floor contains the marble tomb of St. John of Kronstadt. The convent was disbanded by the Soviets in 1923. It was reopened as a branch of P¨¹htitsa Convent in 1991.
    naberezhnaya Reki Karpovki
    Use metro station. "Petrogradskaia. The toy museum is across the river.

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    The church serving the Armed Forces of RF

    by Skillsbus Written Jul 26, 2013

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    The church was built on the money left by Matvey Kirin, the skipper of Row Force. It was 76 thousand rubles. It was decided to build up the church in honor of the coronation of Nicolas II, so the Emperor gave 25 thousand rubles more for the building. The works started in 1888, and the church was blessed a year later.

    But nowadays there’s a training station for the submariners. Inside a church there’s a vertical shaft reaching the dome, filled with water. The students are floating up in there, as if they’re ascending under the dome, to God, even just according to the Archimedes' Law of Buoyancy. The ascending is being done in the diving suit ISP-60 and the breathing system IDA-59. The entrance into the water is organized based on the principle of the submarines: through the torpedo apparatus, or the lock chamber.

    The Church insisted on the cathedral being returned to it, but after the “Kursk” submarine accident, gave up on this idea. The possibility for the trainings of the divers-wreckers was considered to be pleasing to God. The most surprising point is, that there are still the prayer services held on Sundays in the church.
    100 Bolshoy pr. 30 min on foot from Vasileostrovskaya metro station.

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    Climb St. Isaac's Dome

    by grandmaR Written Apr 25, 2010

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    Lookind down
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    After we saw the inside, the guide took me back to the car and my granddaughter climbed to the top of the dome which I understand is the fourth highest in the world - St. Peter's being the tallest. She said her legs burned afterwards, as there are over 300 steps up to the cathedral's colonnade.

    The Colonnade observation point is open: Thursday to Tuesday, 11am to 6pm, last admission is at 5pm Closed: Wednesdays

    Although the website says photography is forbidden here, we did not find this to be the case.

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    Mosque

    by brazwhazz Written Dec 23, 2007

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    Tiny people in front of the mosque
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    The only mosque in Saint-Petersburg is not a tourist attraction per se, but anyone who visits the Peter and Paul Fortress should take the time to check it out, seeing as it is so near. Modelled on Samarkand's Gur Emir Mausoleum, it was built from 1910 to 1921 and remains one of the largest mosques in Europe. The minarets are 48 metres high and the blue dome, 39 metres high.

    The building is in excellent condition, having undergone extensive renovation works since 1980.

    The mosque is located at Kronversky Prospekt 7, a few minutes on foot from the Gorkovskaya metro station. Kronversky Prospekt is the semi-circular street that goes around Alexandrovsky Park.

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    Chesme Church

    by brazwhazz Written Dec 22, 2007

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    Chesme Church

    Chesme Church is a beautiful candy-like, pink-and-white Gothic church near the Moskovskaya metro station. It was built from 1774 to 1780 by Yury Velten on the very spot where Catherine the Great had learnt of Russia's victory over the Turks at the Battle of Çeşme, hence its name.

    The church, located at Ulitsa Lensoveta 12, is open daily from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Admission is free.

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    Catholic Churches in St. Petersburg

    by sennaya Written May 16, 2007

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    There are two Catholic Churches in St. Petersburg.

    Church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin
    Services take place Sundays at 1:30 pm in the Mary. Exit through the bank.
    Address: Pervaya (1st) Krasnoarmeyskaya Ulitsa 11
    Metro: Tekhnologichesky Institute

    St. Catherine Roman Catholic Church
    conducts masses on Sundays at 9:30 am in English, 10:30 am in Russian, 12 pm in Russian, 1:30 pm in Polish, 7 pm in Russian.
    Weekday services are at 8 am and 6:30 pm in Russian
    Address: Nevsky Prospekt 32-34
    Metro: Nevsky Prospekt/Gostiny Dvor
    Telephone: 311-71-70

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    A beautiful mosque...

    by nickenyfiken Updated Jun 2, 2006
    The mosque

    We found a mosque close to the Peter Pauls fortress. I would have liked to enter, if that would have been okay, but we couldn't find the entrance, maybe because there were some renovations going on, or maybe because we didn't search enough.

    Close to metro-station Gorkovskaya.

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    Dmitri Solunski

    by hartti Updated Mar 8, 2006

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    Dmitri Solunski

    Church of Dmitri Solunski (Dmitrij Solunskij, Dmitry Solunsky, Dmitrij = Demetrius, Dimetrius, Demitrius) is an old church on Vasily Island, on Tuchkov Street. During Soviet time it was a nuclear? research lab, but nowadays under reparation. You may climb up to the tower to watch a "Zenit" football game in former Lenin Stadion, nowadays Petrovski Stadion. Being one of the highest tower on the island, from the tower you may see a wonderful view to Neva and above the whole city center.

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    You won't believe it is not Britain

    by Assenczo Updated May 11, 2005

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    Cesme Church

    This is the Cesme battle commemorative church. It is seldom on the itinerary of any tourist because it is off the main tourist area and there is too much to see for the little time tourists have in St. Petersburg anyway. What amazes me is this typical Petersburgian cross of European influences and Russian input, in this case Gothic style church, reincarnated as something very local, material and colour wise - imagine this structure in Rouen and Claude Monet reproducing it - he would go mad. Location? Just off the new “communist” center of Petersburg, on Moskovski prospect. One can visit on the way to the airport.

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    Fedorovsky Cathedral

    by mikelisaanna Updated May 7, 2005

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    Fedorovsky Cathedral in Tsarskoye Selo

    This small cathedral/large church is located outside the village of Tsarskoye Selo. It was built in the early 1900s as a church for the troops responsible for guarding the royal family. While it is much plainer than the cathedrals in central St. Petrsburg, we found it interesting because it was still undergoing restoration in 2003, and gave us a feel for the massive amount of work that has been and is still being done to repair the damage done during World War II to Tsarskoye Selo's palaces and churches

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    Wedding Ceremony

    by sophiebeans Updated Feb 14, 2005
    Russians getting hitched!

    On the day we visited St. Vladamir's - on a Monday - we saw a wedding ceremony being performed. Unlike the church services I am used to in America, the churches in Russia are open to anyone at just about any time, no matter what happens to be going on inside. I kind of felt like an intruder coming into the church during this sacred cememony, but apparently it's no problem in Russia.! I felt lucky to be able to witness it! The family members attending the ceremony were taking lots of pictures of the bride and groom, so I snuck one in, too.

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    St. Vladamir's Church

    by sophiebeans Updated Feb 11, 2005
    St. Vladamir's

    This church is located right in the city, but I would imagine many tourists do not visit it because it isn't one of the big, grand attractions talked about when you visit St. Petersburg and it still is a functioning church that holds services. My friend brought me here to show me the place where she was baptised.

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    Andreevski Church

    by hartti Written Jan 27, 2005

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    Andreevski Church

    Andreevski Church is the oldest church on Vasilievki Island. In every church there are many beautiful pictures - icons - and specially in this small church. Its opposite side of the Andreevski Market Hall.

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    Unusual sightseeing on a boring way to the airport

    by Nevskij93 Written Aug 30, 2004

    When going on Moskovskij Avenue to Pulkovo Airport, one does not get much to see once the center has been passed.
    However, there is a very nice jewel hidden just behind large concrete architectural structures of Stalin's era - The Chesma Church.
    It was designed by French architect Felten between 1777 and 1780 and named in honor of the Russian victory over the Turks at the Battle of the Bay of Chesma in 1770 in Asia Minor.

    This neo-gothic church is situated on the street parallel to Moskovskij Avenue and one can ask the driver to take a very small turn to see it.

    Address:
    Gastello Street #12 (former Lensoveta Street)

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    Synagogue

    by annk Updated Sep 21, 2003

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    Included in our complimentary tour was a visit to St. Petersburg's synagogue, the only one in the city.

    Due to harsh religious restrictions there was only a small population of Jewish residents until the later 19th century. Czar Alexander II permitted construction of a synagogue in 1873 although construction didn't start until 1880 with completion in 1893. During WWII, luckily the St. Petersburg jewish community was spared the Nazi genocide. But even today the Jewish population remains small at 8-10,000.

    The style is Moorish-Islamic in design and it appeared to be freshly painted.

    Location: Lermonovsky Prospect 2

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