Hermitage, Saint Petersburg

252 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Hermitage
    by Oleg_D.
  • Hermitage
    by Oleg_D.
  • Maddonna with the flower
    Maddonna with the flower
    by Oleg_D.
  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    The Military Gallery of 1812

    by Oleg_D. Written Mar 10, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The Military Gallery of 1812 was created by Carlo Rossi in 1826 in commemoration of Russian Imperial Army participation in the Napoleonic Wars.
    The Gallery is divided by doubled columns into three sections; the middle section forms the threshold to the St George Hall (the throne room), and is lit by skylights in the painted vaults.
    332 portraits of the generals who were heroes of the 1812 War were hung on the walls in five rows. These portraits were created by the British artist George Dawe with the participation of Russian artists Alexander Polyakov and Wilhelm Golike.
    Among the works on display are formal portraits of General-Fieldmarshals Mikhail Kutuzov, Mikhail Barclay de Tolly, Grand Prince Constantine Pavlovich and Arthur, Duke of Wellington, who was promoted to the rank of General-Fieldmarshal of the Russian army after the victory over Napoleon at Waterloo in 1815.
    At the short ends of the Gallery hang equestrian portraits of Emperor Alexander I and his ally in the war with Napoleon, Frederick-William III of Prussia (both by Franz Kruger), and of the Austrian Emperor Francis I (Peter Krafft).
    The ceremonial opening of the Gallery on 25 October 1826 coincided with the anniversary of the expulsion of Napoleon's army from Russia and the occasion was marked by a march-past of Cavalry and Infantry Regiments before portraits of their commanders during the War of 1812.

    Visitors are allowed to take non commercial photos without flash light and tripod if they bought photo permission. You can buy that photo permission together with your ticket in the cash desk. The price of photo permission is 200 rubles (about 5 euros).

    Opening hours:
    Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday:
    10.30-18.00
    Wednesday: 10.30-21.00

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    The Military Gallery of 1812

    by Oleg_D. Written Mar 10, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    General Field Marchal M. I. Kutuzov
    4 more images

    The Military Gallery of 1812 was created by Carlo Rossi in 1826 in commemoration of Russian Imperial Army participation in the Napoleonic Wars.
    332 portraits of the generals who were heroes of the 1812 War were hung on the walls in five rows. These portraits were created by the British artist George Dawe with the participation of Russian artists Alexander Polyakov and Wilhelm Golike.
    Among the works on display are formal portraits of General-Fieldmarshals Mikhail Kutuzov, Mikhail Barclay de Tolly, Grand Prince Constantine Pavlovich and Arthur, Duke of Wellington, who was promoted to the rank of General-Fieldmarshal of the Russian army after the victory over Napoleon at Waterloo in 1815.
    Visitors are allowed to take non commercial photos without flash light and tripod if they bought photo permission. You can buy that photo permission together with your ticket in the cash desk. The price of photo permission is 200 rubles (about 5 euros).

    Opening hours:
    Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday:
    10.30-18.00
    Wednesday: 10.30-21.00

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    The Military Gallery of 1812

    by Oleg_D. Written Mar 10, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The Military Gallery of 1812 was created by Carlo Rossi in 1826 in commemoration of Russian Imperial Army participation in the Napoleonic Wars.
    332 portraits of the generals who were heroes of the 1812 War were hung on the walls in five rows. These portraits were created by the British artist George Dawe with the participation of Russian artists Alexander Polyakov and Wilhelm Golike.
    The ceremonial opening of the Gallery on 25 October 1826 coincided with the anniversary of the expulsion of Napoleon's army from Russia and the occasion was marked by a march-past of Cavalry and Infantry Regiments before portraits of their commanders during the War of 1812.

    Visitors are allowed to take non commercial photos without flash light and tripod if they bought photo permission. You can buy that photo permission together with your ticket in the cash desk. The price of photo permission is 200 rubles (about 5 euros).

    Opening hours:
    Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday:
    10.30-18.00
    Wednesday: 10.30-21.00

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    The Military Gallery of 1812

    by Oleg_D. Written Mar 10, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Battle of Borodino
    4 more images

    The Military Gallery of 1812 was created by Carlo Rossi in 1826 in commemoration of Russian Imperial Army participation in the Napoleonic Wars. Gallery posses several paintings of German painter Peter Hess who lived and worked in Russia and created series of paintings dedicated to the famous victories of Russian Army in the campaign of 1812. His canvas is showing the dramatic moments of the battles, tactics of those times and uniforms in the most accurately manner, although I found some minor mistakes.
    His most famous painting “The Battle of Borodino, 1812” represented in Military Gallery of 1812. You can see the most dramatic for Russian Army moment when the Commander of left flank of Russian defense General Duke Peter Bagration was mortally wounded. You can see him sitting among his entourage before he lost his consciences and giving his last orders to General Peter Konovnitsyn (on white horse) who temporarily replaced him. On the left hand side you can see the squares of 2nd Brigade of Russian Guard Infantry consisted of two regiments Life Guard Izmaylovsky and Life Guard Litovsky. Both regiments are repulsing the attack of French heavy cavalry. On right hand side you can see Russian cuirassiers of Yekaterinoslavsky Cuirassier Regiment galloping to counterattack French cavalry attacking Russian guardsmen. Battle of Borodino was the bloodiest battle of XIX century. French lost about fifty five thousand soldiers and officers and Russians about forty seven thousand. World never saw such casualties for several centuries and will never see before WW I.

    Visitors are allowed to take non commercial photos without flash light and tripod if they bought photo permission. You can buy that photo permission together with your ticket in the cash desk. The price of photo permission is 200 rubles (about 5 euros).

    Opening hours:
    Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday:
    10.30-18.00
    Wednesday: 10.30-21.00

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Masterpieces of Italian Armorers

    by Oleg_D. Written Jan 17, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    When you visit the Knight Hall of State Hermitage you shall be able to see the show case with the arms armors produced by Italian armorers in XVI century. All those are artifacts are real masterpieces of smithery. Among those armors are the helmet and pauldrons produced by famous Milanese armorer Fillipo Negroli (1510-1579). These helmet and pauldrons (shoulder defenses) were the parts of one full suit of plate armor known as the heroic or necromonger suit of armor. Today, different pieces of that suit of armor distributed between different museums of Europe and America.
    Visitors are allowed to take non commercial photos without flash light and tripod if they bought photo permission. You can buy that photo permission together with your ticket in the cash desk. The price of photo permission is 200 rubles (about 5 euros).

    Opening hours:
    Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday:
    10.30-18.00
    Wednesday: 10.30-21.00

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Masterpieces of Leonardo Da Vinci

    by Oleg_D. Written Jan 17, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Maddonna with the flower
    4 more images

    The State Hermitage has one of the best Collection of West European arts in the world. There are twelve known Leonardo Da Vinci’s works in the world now. Two of them are in the State Hermitage. You can see here “Madonna with the flower” painted by Leonardo Da Vinci in 1478 and “Madonna with the Child” also known as “Madonna Litta” painted by him in 1490-1491. You can also see “The Repenting Magdalene” painted by Gian Pietro Rizzoli known as Giampietrino the best among the Leonardo’s disciples. He was active between 1508 and 1549.
    All these master pieces are assembled for the public display in special hall.
    Visitors are allowed to take non commercial photos without flash light and tripod if they bought photo permission. You can buy that photo permission together with your ticket in the cash desk. The price of photo permission is 200 rubles (about 5 euros).

    Opening hours:
    Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday:
    10.30-18.00
    Wednesday: 10.30-21.00

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • easterntrekker's Profile Photo

    Hermitage

    by easterntrekker Written Jan 5, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Wow
    4 more images

    Hermitage
    We followed the directions on our map and walked to the Hermitage...ended up going to the back by the river but eventually circled the whole building and ended up in the huge square and found the front door.There was no line up for tickets ..Sept ...We bought a ticket for 400 rouples , a camera pass for 200 rouples and a 350 audio guide ..we started without the audio guide but we were feeling so lost.The guide was great and so easy to use. it takes you to the cream of the museum ...there is just so much to see.
    It is unreal...the grand staircase in itself is so much . Priceless art from all over We spent most of our time in the Italian art section...saw some art from some of the worlds most famous artists. The audio guide help us to better appreciate what we were seeing.We saw paintings by Monet , Leonardo Devincy , Antonio Canova, and Michelangelo's crouching boy.
    The palace rooms in themselves were so amazing ...pillars and mantels and huge urns in green maericitee. Then there was the gold room and the room filled with chandeliers ..
    We spent 4.5 hours there in all and really only touched on the highlights.
    We grabbed a sandwich in the cafeteria to save time. I was happy there were lots of benches through out ....it saved me as I was getting pretty exhausted.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Raphael Loggias of the State Hermitage

    by Oleg_D. Written Dec 1, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The Raphael Loggias in the Hermitage are a copy of the famous Gallery created in the 16th century in the Vatican Palace by the architect Donato Bramante. Since those loggias in Vatican are not accessible for the tourists, try to see its copy in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Its walls and vaults were painted by Raphael's pupils after his sketches and under his supervision. The Hermitage gallery was created at Catherine II's wish. Originally it was a separate construction (architect Giacomo Quarenghi), but in the mid-19th century it was included into the New Hermitage designed as a museum building by the architect Leo von Klenze. Copies of the Vatican frescoes were produced in tempera on canvas by a group of artists under Christopher Unterberger. The Raphael Loggias make up an integral ensemble displaying a harmony of architecture, painting and sculpture. The gallery consists of thirteen identical sections, each having its own vault.
    Opening hours:
    Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday:
    10.30-18.00
    Wednesday: 10.30-21.00

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Raphael Loggias of the State Hermitage. Details.

    by Oleg_D. Written Dec 1, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The Raphael Loggias in the Hermitage are a copy of the famous Gallery created in the 16th century in the Vatican Palace by the architect Donato Bramante. Since those loggias in Vatican are not accessible for the tourists, try to see its copy in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Its walls and vaults were painted by Raphael's pupils after his sketches and under his supervision. The Hermitage gallery was created at Catherine II's wish. Originally it was a separate construction (architect Giacomo Quarenghi), but in the mid-19th century it was included into the New Hermitage designed as a museum building by the architect Leo von Klenze. Copies of the Vatican frescoes were produced in tempera on canvas by a group of artists under Christopher Unterberger. The Raphael Loggias make up an integral ensemble displaying a harmony of architecture, painting and sculpture. The gallery consists of thirteen identical sections, each having its own vault.
    Opening hours:
    Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday:
    10.30-18.00
    Wednesday: 10.30-21.00

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • starship's Profile Photo

    The Hermitage ~ Winter Palace

    by starship Updated Nov 4, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Hermitage

    The Hermitage Museum is one of the most prestigious art museums in the world. It occupies the Winter Palace & 4 more buildings. So grand and stately is the edifice of the Winter Palace that it can only be seen in its entirety from the opposite banks of the Neva River or the Spit of Vasilyevsky Island. The fourth palace of this name, the eminent architect Rastrelli designed the main building in the Baroque style, the last of its kind. The Winter Palace was built for Elizabeth Petrovna, a daughter of Peter the Great; however she died before its completion. It subsequently became the seat of the Imperial Dynasty and a focal point of St. Petersburg. In 1922, the Winter Palace was handed over to The Hermitage Museum.

    The original green and white, gold trimmed Winter Palace houses priceless works of art thought to number 2.7 million individual items!! So large and impressive is the collection of the Hermitage, it is said that if a visitor stood before each work of art for one minute, it would take the visitor 7 years or more to see the collection in its entirety!!! Even though we spent only a few hours visiting here, we were able to see some wonderful works of art.

    The Hermitage takes its name from 'hermitage' or the several rooms that Catherine the Great set aside in the palace as a place of retreat. That it became became known as a museum in its own right took place about the year 1764.

    There is a charge of US $4 (2005 price) for using a camera, and you must display the appropriate sticker. To use a video cam is at least twice that rate. No flash photography of paintings allowed. I believe the rule also held for non-flash cameras & video cams. Here as in the Yusupov Palace, women attendants in each room watch for rule-breakers and will confront you.

    Do not wear anything heavier than a long sleeved shirt inside during the summer as it can become rather stiffeling in The Hermitage. Bathrooms are few & far between but there are several gift shops!

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    The Knight’s Hall

    by Oleg_D. Updated Oct 17, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The Knight’s Hall is the collection of medieval mostly West European arms and armor. The majority of its artifacts derive from the so-called Arsenal of Tsarskoye Selo. That arsenal was the private collection of Russian Emperor Nicholas I (1825-1855). He was the passionate collector of medieval arms and armor and that was the reason why other European monarchs presented him such things. Nicholas I also was buying arms and armor in European auctions through his agents. As the result the Knight’s Hall can boast by two full plate armors also known as German Gothic “white armor” of XV century. Both were made in Germany in second half of XVth century. One of hem attributed to Lorenz Helmschmidt who was probably the best armor smith of XVth century and who was the armorer of the Emperor of Holy Roman Empire.
    There are also at least five so called Maximilian full plate armors produced in beginning of XVI century in the collection. Unfortunately only small part of the collection is displayed in permanent exhibition. Anyway visit to the Knight’s Hall will be very interesting. The Knight Hall is situated in the hall #243 at first floor if you consider real first floor as the ground one.
    Visitors are allowed to take non commercial photos without flash light and tripod if they bought photo permission. You can buy that photo permission together with your ticket in the cash desk. The price of photo permission is 200 rubles (about 5 euros).

    Opening hours:
    Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday:
    10.30-18.00
    Wednesday: 10.30-21.00

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    The Jordan Staircase

    by Oleg_D. Written Sep 30, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    This staircase was originally projected and built by Francesco Bartolomeo Rastrelli in XVIII century as the parade stairs of the Imperial Winter Palace. Unfortunately the Jordan Staircase was badly damaged in the great fire in 1837. That’s why today you see the stairs restored by Russian architect Vasiliy Stasov according to Rastrelli’s original plan. Stairs received its name because they were part of official way of Imperial procession to the river Neva during the ceremony of blessing of the water on Epiphany. That ceremony celebrates the baptism of Christ in the river Jordan.
    Visitors are allowed to take non commercial photos without flash light and tripod if they bought photo permission. You can buy that photo permission together with your ticket in the cash desk. The price of photo permission is 200 rubles (about 5 euros).

    Opening hours:
    Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday:
    10.30-18.00
    Wednesday: 10.30-21.00

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    The Gallery of the History of Ancient Painting

    by Oleg_D. Written Sep 27, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The Gallery of the History of Ancient Painting is situated in the hall number twenty five at the first floor of so-called New Hermitage. This building was built in the mid of XIX century during the rule of Emperor Nicholas I (1825-1855). This very long gallery is full the fabulous masterpieces of fine arts. But it is always better to see under your own eyes than read or listen about thousand times.
    Visitors are allowed to take non commercial photos without flash light and tripod if they bought photo permission. You can buy that photo permission together with your ticket in the cash desk. The price of photo permission is 200 rubles (about 5 euros).

    Opening hours:
    Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday:
    10.30-18.00
    Wednesday: 10.30-21.00

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Hermitage Museum

    by Mikebb Updated May 12, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Decorative Ceilings & Chanderliers - Hermitage
    2 more images

    The Hermitage Museum (Winter Palace) is a major highlight of any visit to St Petersburg. We visited as part of our coach tour to Russia and must say we were amazed by the beauty and extravagence of this Palace.

    The size of the rooms and beauty of the high ceilings, the decoration of the cornices as seen in these photos was something to see and remember.

    No restriction on cameras, so make certain you have a large card.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Hermitage Paintings - Raffaello - The Holy Family

    by Mikebb Updated Apr 20, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Holy Family
    1 more image

    Many of the rooms open to the public have outstanding paintings by the Masters. So many to view and being able to get so close to the paintings and be allowed to take photos is a huge bonus.

    Crowds can be a problem and often restrict the view. I am tall and most times could look over shoulders. If people waited their turn it would benefit everyone.

    Many paintings are of a religious theme.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Saint Petersburg

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

95 travelers online now

Comments

View all Saint Petersburg hotels