Museums, Saint Petersburg

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    Erarta Museum and Galleries of Contemporary Art

    by jess_vin Updated Sep 15, 2014

    Before learning Russian and visiting St Petersburg, I never appreciated just how rich and complex Russia's contemporary history has been. After visiting Erarta, however, I've found that the museum not only works hard at presenting truly innovative works of art, its art also reflects Russia's contemporary history and society in a very organic way. I love that Erarta celebrates the unique input of any individual, and takes the stereotypically overly abstract aspects of contemporary art and makes them accessible and powerful to the viewer.

    Erarta is Russia's largest private museum of contemporary art with over 2300 works by more than 170 artists from various regions of the country in its collection displayed over 10,000 sqm. Unique multimedia projects and interactive installations make it a must-see attraction for gaining insight into modern Russia while state-of-the-art infrastructure and a visitor-friendly attitude make it a familiar landscape for international guests.

    Erarta Museum and Galleries of Contemporary Art Erarta Museum and Galleries of Contemporary Art Erarta Museum and Galleries of Contemporary Art
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    The Pushkin Apartment Museum

    by johngayton Updated Sep 12, 2014

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    Alexander Pushkin (1799 to 1837) is Russia's most favoured literary hero and is regarded as the founder of modern Russian literature. Although primarily a poet his output includes the verse-novel Eugene Onedin and several plays. His main contribution to the development of Russian literature was to break away from the stylised Church Slavonic generally favoured by Russian writers and instead to use the vernacular, and even colloquial language.

    The young Pushkin, despite being born into nobility, was a firm advocate for social reform and literary radicalism which resulted in his exile from St Petersburg in 1820. For the next 10 years Pushkin had a see-saw relationship with the Tsar's government, during which period his work was subject to censorship and in some cases prohibition. It wasn't until after his marriage in 1831, to the Muscovite beauty, Natalya Goncharova, that he was re-admitted to the Imperial court.

    From 1831 until his death in 1837 Pushkin's literary influence included his support of the up-and-coming Nikolai Gogol whose short stories were published in Pushkin's magazine, "The Contemporary".

    Pushkin was mortally injured during a duel in February 1837 - having accused the French officer Georges d'Anthes of attempting to seduce his wife. He died two days later in his St Petersburg apartment on the Moika Embankment.

    The apartment is now a museum, part of the National Pushkin Museum complex, and is open to the public every day except Tuesdays and the last Friday of each month. The main room is the bookcase-lined study where Pushkin's later works were written. To commemorate his death a small group of descendants and local notables gather there on February 10th and observe a minute's silence at 2.45 pm, the official time of death.

    Unfortunately the day we visited turned out to be the last Friday of the month and so we had to make do with a wander in the courtyard. One for my list on my next visit.

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    The Old Stock Exchange

    by johngayton Written Sep 1, 2014

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    This impressive neo-Classical building on the Spit of Vasilievsky Island is the former Stock Exchange, or Bourse. It dates from the early 19th century when this area was the city's main docks and provided an exchange for local and visiting merchants.

    When the commercial docks were moved out of the city centre in the early 20th century the building was used by the Naval College, later becoming the Naval Museum. In April this year, 2014, the Stock Exchange was acquired by the Hermitage and is in the process of being redeveloped as a Museum of State Symbolism and will incorporate exhibits from the Naval Museum.

    In front of the Bourse is a bas-relief map of the area and the local custom is to toss a small coin into it - if the coin lands on the Stock Exchange you'll be lucky with money.

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    Russian Museum - Mikhailovsky Palace

    by johngayton Written Jul 10, 2014

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    The Hermitage is of course St Petersburg's best known museum but its scale, to my mind, requires a serious visit over the course of a couple of days. With only three, very full, days on this trip (May 2014) I had to be a bit selective as what I was going to see and do.

    I hadn't planned on visiting the Russian Museum but having a wander of the Mikhailovsky Gardens whilst the rest of our little group was investigating the nearby Church of Our Saviour on Spilled Blood I reckoned the Mikhailovsky Palace would be worth an afternoon.

    As it happened we had arranged to dine in the area that evening at Yat, on the Moika Embankment, and so the Russian Museum fitted perfectly with our plans.

    This turned out to be exactly the sort of museum I appreciate. Its collection is focused on Russian Fine Art from the 11th to the 21st centuries and is housed in the majestic Neoclassical former palace of Grand Duke Mikhail Pavlovich which was built between 1819 and 1825.

    I suppose, strictly-speaking, this is an art gallery, rather than a museum. However because of the way the exhibits are arranged, following a logical chronology, it works as a history lesson, not just of Russian art but of Russian culture and historical events.

    Following the rooms in sequence we begin on the first floor with early Orthodox icons and classical religious works. Rooms 5 to 17 feature portraits, landscapes and scenes in the style of the Russian academic school, interspersed with sculptures from the period.

    Returning to the ground floor the late 19th to the early 20th century are covered and of particular note in this part of the palace are the period furnishings, the mosaicked floors and the elaborate ceilings.

    A digression to the Rossi Wing from room 48 (Carlo Rossi having been the palace's architect) gives a fascinating insight into Russian folk art, and especially the finely-worked, and often amusing, 18th century bone-carvings from the village of Kholmogory.

    By now we'd spent about two hours in the museum, which was thirsty work, and so a swift visit to the basement cafe seemed like a good idea. Fortunately this sold beer and at 150 (I think) roubles not a particularly expensive one at that. The cafe shut at 5 which left us an hour to complete our visit in the Benois wing with its more modern works. These charted the rise of the Socialist style, along with avant-garde artists which are often subtly critical of the regime.

    All-in we spent about four hours in this fascinating museum, and four hours well-spent it was. The museum is well laid-out with plenty of bilingual (Russian and English) information and there is a self-guided audio tour available. Photography is allowed in most rooms, obviously without flash, and for the 350 rouble entrance fee I reckoned was excellent value-for-money.

    I intend to put together a travelogue or two with my personal highlights - so watch this space.

    The museum is open Thursdays 1 pm to 9 pm and from 10 am to 6 pm on other days except Tuesday when it is closed.

    Website below has all the relevant details:

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    Paintings of Artillery Museum

    by Oleg_D. Written May 21, 2014

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    Military Historical Museum of Artillery, Combat Engineers and Signal Corps has several canvas of famous Russian painter of Polish origin January (Jan) Sukhodolsky (1797-1875) and among them the biggest one is “The assault of Fortress Ochakov in 1788”. This painting dedicated to the events of Russo-Turkish War of 1787-1792. Turkish fortress Ochakov (it situated in the territory of Modern Ukraine) was besieged in July of 1788 by Russian Army under Duke Gregory Potyomkin. Russian fleet under Prince Nassau Ziegen blocked Ochakov from the Black Sea. But all those measures were not enough to lead Turkish commander to surrender. Fifty thousand Russian Imperial soldiers were besieging Turkish garrison consisted of fifteen thousand fighters for several months until December 6, 1788 when Russian army accomplished general assault of the fortress. Assault was bloody, despite of fierce resistance of Turkish troops everything was finished for two hours. Fortress was captured, Russian casualties were 4800 KIA and WIA and Turkish casualties were 11000 KIA and WIA and also 4500 POWs.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flash light and tripod if they bought additional photo permission (about 2.10 Euros)

    Opening Hours
    Wednesdays – Sundays
    11.00 -18.00
    Ticket windows shut one hour before the museum closes
    Closed Mondays, Tuesdays and the last Thursday of the month
    Tickets: Adults – 300 rubles (6.6 Euros)
    School-children, students – 150 rubles (3.3 Euros)
    Photo permission – 100 rubles (2.10 Euros)
    Video permission - 200 rubles (4.20 Euros)

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    Russian Ethnographic Museum

    by GIPA Written May 19, 2014

    I had the previous information that the Russian Federation is compound by 150 ethnic groups, but facing this reality at a museum was such an emotional experience.
    Cruising the Summer Gardens I reached that palace that is divided in 2 museums : Russian museum and Ethnography museum.
    The only problem I felt was that the staff misunderstands both museums : I asked for this museum to a lady at the entrance and she conduced me to the Russian museum , probably because ethnographic is less visited.
    The exposition is spread in two floors : at the first one you will find the magnificent Marble Hall , a 1000 sq metre gallery surrounded by pink Karelian marble columns. There , you can apreciate an exposition of carpets from all the former soviet republics and other areas of Russia.
    Siberians , Caucasians , Ucranians , Moldavians , Mountain jews , people from Central Asia , Volga region , Urals , Karelia , all , all , absolutely all of them are represented there. And so do their clothes , artifacts , treasures.... what a lesson , it was pretty unforgettable.
    Unfortunately , I went there in the evening and as it was not almost closing , I ´d rather staying there for quite a long time.
    As in all russian museums , there are lots of cutty ladies doing their best for making your visit the most pleasant as possible. They were so curious on meeting a brazilian! :)
    Don´t miss this museum!

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    Paintings of Artillery Museum

    by Oleg_D. Written May 19, 2014

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    Victor Vikentyevich Mazurovsky was Russian painter of Polish origin. To my mind he was the best of all Russian and probably World painters who used to paint cavalry combat scenes. Military Historical Museum of Artillery, Combat Engineers and Signal Corps possesses several of his canvas. Since May 2014 his third canvas “The Exploit of Life Guard Horse Regiment during the battle of Warsaw in 1831” was put in the permanent exhibition of the museum. This painting shows the very well known event of Pacification of Polish Insurrection of 1830-1831. The general battle between Russian Imperial Army under Fieldmarshal Paskevich and Polish Insurgents took place near Warsaw in 1831. During the battle four Polish cavalry regiments attacked Life Guard Horse Grenadier Regiment. Regiment was badly outnumbered and suffered heavy casualties but it held out without any help for one hour. Then Russian reinforcements arrived at the scene, repulsed and crashed Polish cavalry. In the canvas you can see Horse Grenadiers in marching or field uniform. And under the painting, in the showcase you can see the figure of Horse Grenadier in parade (full dress) uniform.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flash light and tripod if they bought additional photo permission (about 2.10 Euros)

    Opening Hours
    Wednesdays – Sundays
    11.00 -18.00
    Ticket windows shut one hour before the museum closes
    Closed Mondays, Tuesdays and the last Thursday of the month
    Tickets: Adults – 300 rubles (6.6 Euros)
    School-children, students – 150 rubles (3.3 Euros)
    Photo permission – 100 rubles (2.10 Euros)
    Video permission - 200 rubles (4.20 Euros)

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    Paintings of Artillery Museum

    by Oleg_D. Updated May 1, 2014

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Military Historical Museum of Artillery, Combat Engineers and Signal Corps has several canvas of famous Russian painter of Polish origin January (Jan) Sukhodolsky (1797-1875) dedicated to Russo-Turkish War of 1828-1829. Greek national uprising of 1821 was the reason of Russian participation in this war. Russian Imperial Government of Emperor Alexander I conducted nonintervention policy and was neutral. But the Government of new Emperor Nicholas I was forced to enter the war against Ottoman Empire under the pressure of public opinion. Here you can see the Jan Sukhodolsky painting “Assault of Akhaltsih fortress on August 15, 1828”. City and fortress of Akhaltsih was situated at the Transcaucasian Theater of operations. Sukhodolsky showed the late evening of August 15, 1828 than one Russian artillery grenade caused the fire in besieged city. It was decided to use that fire as the illumination of assault. After fierce hand to hand fight city was captured by the morning of next day. Akhaltsih now is the city Akhatsikhe in southern part of republic of Georgia.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flash light and tripod if they bought additional photo permission (about 2.10 Euros)

    Opening Hours
    Wednesdays – Sundays
    11.00 -18.00
    Ticket windows shut one hour before the museum closes
    Closed Mondays, Tuesdays and the last Thursday of the month
    Tickets: Adults – 300 rubles (6.6 Euros)
    School-children, students – 150 rubles (3.3 Euros)
    Photo permission – 100 rubles (2.10 Euros)
    Video permission - 200 rubles (4.20 Euros)

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    Paintings of Artillery Museum

    by Oleg_D. Written Mar 19, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Military Historical Museum of Artillery, Combat Engineers and Signal Corps has several canvas of famous Russian painter of Polish origin January (Jan) Sukhodolsky (1797-1875) dedicated to Russo-Turkish War of 1828-1829. Greek national uprising of 1821 was the reason of Russian participation in this war. Here you can see the Jan Sukhodolsky painting “Assault of the fortress of Kars on June 23, 1828”. Kars was the very important stronghold at the Transcaucasian theater of operations. Fortress itself was well supplied and garrisoned. Russian troops under command of General and future Field Marshal Ivan Theodorovich Paskevich started the bombardment of Kars with first rays of the sun. At four o’clock in the morning first columns of Russian infantry advanced toward Turkish defenses. About eight o’clock in the morning Russian light infantry entered to the city of Kars after fierce hand to hand fighting. Turkish commander Emin Pasha started negotiation, in fact he tried to win enough time and receive support from Turkish Corps of Kios Mohammed Pasha from Erzerum. Paskevich demanded unconditional capitulation immediately and Emin Pasha capitulated at ten o’clock in the morning of June 23, 1828. All Turkish troops were released on parole. That impregnable fortress fell for six hours time. Russians lost during the storm three hundred soldiers and NCOs KIA including fifteen commissioned officers. Turks lost two thousand KIA and thirteen hundred were captured. Russians also captured about one hundred and fifty guns.
    Vanguard of Turkish fresh Corps from Erzerum was five kilometers from Russian siege position this time but that Corps was late and retreated.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flash light and tripod if they bought additional photo permission (about 2.10 Euros)

    Opening Hours
    Wednesdays – Sundays
    11.00 -18.00
    Ticket windows shut one hour before the museum closes
    Closed Mondays, Tuesdays and the last Thursday of the month
    Tickets: Adults – 300 rubles (6.6 Euros)
    School-children, students – 150 rubles (3.3 Euros)
    Photo permission – 100 rubles (2.10 Euros)
    Video permission - 200 rubles (4.20 Euros)

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    Paintings of Artillery Museum

    by Oleg_D. Updated Mar 18, 2014

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Victor Vikentyevich Mazurovsky was Russian painter of Polish origin. To my mind he was the best of all Russian and probably World painters who used to paint cavalry combat scenes. Military Historical Museum of Artillery, Combat Engineers and Signal Corps possesses several of his canvas. Two of them are in permanent exhibition and they are the real masterpieces of military painting.
    Here you can see “Attack of Russian Cavalry against French Battery during the battle of Borodino 1812”. Borodino was the bloodiest battle from the times immemorial until WW I. Both sides, Russians and French lost one hundred thousand soldiers, NCOs, COs and Generals. Here you can see the fate of a battery without infantry support. All battery is about to be hacked down to the last man under the strike of the troopers of Life Guard Horse Regiment of Russian Imperial Horse Guards.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flash light and tripod if they bought additional photo permission (about 2.10 Euros)

    Opening Hours
    Wednesdays – Sundays
    11.00 -18.00
    Ticket windows shut one hour before the museum closes
    Closed Mondays, Tuesdays and the last Thursday of the month
    Tickets: Adults – 300 rubles (6.6 Euros)
    School-children, students – 150 rubles (3.3 Euros)
    Photo permission – 100 rubles (2.10 Euros)
    Video permission - 200 rubles (4.20 Euros)

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    Paintings of Artillery Museum

    by Oleg_D. Written Mar 17, 2014

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    “Attack of Life Guard Horse Regiment against French cuirassiers at the battle of Fridland, June 2, 1807” is the painting of Victor Vikentyevich Mazurovsky. Mazurovsky was the best of all Russian and probably World painters who used to paint cavalry combat scenes. Military Historical Museum of Artillery possesses several of his canvas. Two of them are in permanent exhibition and they are the real masterpieces of military painting. “Attack of Life Guard Horse Regiment against French cuirassiers at the battle of Fridland, June 2, 1807” shows the real scenes from that battle then Russian army was pressed hard by French troops of Emperor Napoleon and retreated over several bridges on the other side of the Alle River. Attack of Russian Horse Guards was the typical “Forlorn Hope” or the suicide but provided Russian army chance and time to cross the river in good order and avoid the defeat. Mazurovsky was not a palace painter he showed the war in its reality.

    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flash light and tripod if they bought additional photo permission (about 2.10 Euros)

    Opening Hours
    Wednesdays – Sundays
    11.00 -18.00
    Ticket windows shut one hour before the museum closes
    Closed Mondays, Tuesdays and the last Thursday of the month
    Tickets: Adults – 300 rubles (6.6 Euros)
    School-children, students – 150 rubles (3.3 Euros)
    Photo permission – 100 rubles (2.10 Euros)
    Video permission - 200 rubles (4.20 Euros)

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    Artillery Museum. Armory. Hall 1.

    by Oleg_D. Written Dec 12, 2013

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    Since 2006 Military Historical Museum of Artillery, Missile Troops, Combat Engineers and Signal Corps organized its own armory as the part of the Museum’s permanent exhibition.
    The central part of exhibition in the hall number one occupies equestrian group of three knights in armors produced in XVI century. Their horse armors were made by famous armorer from Nuremberg Kunz Lochner in 1552 for the horse of Duke Johan Wilhelm of Saxe-Weimar and 1556-1560 for the Elector of Saxony Johan Friedrich II.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flash light and tripod if they bought additional photo permission (about 2.10 Euros)

    Opening Hours
    Wednesdays – Sundays
    11.00 -18.00
    Ticket windows shut one hour before the museum closes
    Closed Mondays, Tuesdays and the last Thursday of the month
    Tickets: Adults – 300 rubles (6.6 Euros)
    School-children, students – 150 rubles (3.3 Eurois)
    Photo permission – 100 rubles (2.10 Euros)
    Video permission - 200 rubles ( 4.20 Eros)

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    Artillery Museum. Armory.

    by Oleg_D. Written Dec 12, 2013

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    Since 2006 Military Historical Museum of Artillery, Missile Troops, Combat Engineers and Signal Corps organized its own armory as the part of the Museum’s permanent exhibition.
    You can see there arms and armors of XV-XVII centuries. Collection also includes executioner’s swords or swords of justice and German masks of disgrace of XVII century.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flash light and tripod if they bought additional photo permission (about 2.10 Euros)

    Opening Hours
    Wednesdays – Sundays
    11.00 -18.00
    Ticket windows shut one hour before the museum closes
    Closed Mondays, Tuesdays and the last Thursday of the month
    Tickets: Adults – 300 rubles (6.6 Euros)
    School-children, students – 150 rubles (3.3 Eurois)
    Photo permission – 100 rubles (2.10 Euros)
    Video permission - 200 rubles ( 4.20 Eros)

    Masks of disgrace and swords of justice
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    Artillery Museum. Armory. Hall 2.

    by Oleg_D. Written Dec 12, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Since 2006 Military Historical Museum of Artillery, Missile Troops, Combat Engineers and Signal Corps organized its own armory as the part of the Museum’s permanent exhibition. Hall number two has several full suit of armors composed out of original parts but from different armors of XV-XVII centuries produced in Holy Roman Empire (Germany) and Italy. Among them you shall be able to observe the full so-called “three quarters” cuirassier’s armor from the period of Thirty Years War of 1618-1648.
    Real masterpiece and pearl of collection displayed in the Hall number two are the parts of armor (hand and leg defenses) belonged to Russian Tsar Dmitry I who was better known as False-Dmitry. In fact he was unfrocked monk Gregory Otrepiyev who escaped to the Kingdom of Poland and Lithuania where he proclaimed himself Ivan the Terrible’s dead son Dmitry. He received some support from small number of Polish nobility and Cossacks. In 1605 he started his military campaign against Tsar Boris Godunov and invaded Russia. At last he was crowned Tsar but was killed during the revolt of citizens of Moscow. He was the person with whose name connected the period of so-called “Mutiny” or “Mutinous times» of 1605-1613. And of course you will see the wheel-lock musket belonged to False-Dmitry I.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flash light and tripod if they bought additional photo permission (about 2.10 Euros)
    Opening Hours
    Wednesdays – Sundays
    11.00 -18.00
    Ticket windows shut one hour before the museum closes
    Closed Mondays, Tuesdays and the last Thursday of the month
    Tickets: Adults – 300 rubles (6.6 Euros)
    School-children, students – 150 rubles (3.3 Eurois)
    Photo permission – 100 rubles (2.10 Euros)
    Video permission - 200 rubles ( 4.20 Eros)

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    Museum of Soviet arcade machines

    by Skillsbus Written Aug 12, 2013

    There are moments when you want to come back in the childhood for a short while, because there were so many interesting things that we remember cordially till now.

    From the Soviet childhood they are Soyuzmultfilm’s cartoons, Olympic Bear, planetarium, Sportloto lottery, football at the yard. They are pioneer camps at the Black Sea, horn sounds, walking-tours and songs near the campfire. They are walks with parents and friends at the Parks of Culture with ice-cream, fizzy drink and candy floss, and more—Arcade Games.

    Arcade Games were a part of childhood and youth of Soviet people. They were made at secret military factories from the seventies up to the Perestroika. Forgotten and broken down Soviet-era arcade games are now being restored for Moscow’s newest museum and now it is possible to play and feel atmosphere of the passed epoch.

    Around 20 of 37 different kinds of machines are now in working order. They operate with old Soviet 15 kopek coins, the hammer-and-sickle emblem of which itself conjures up a bygone time. Visitors can try their luck with games like “Morskoi Boi” (Sea Battle), where the player looks through a periscope and pretends to be a submarine commander, attempting to torpedo passing ships. In “Tankodrom” (Tank Training) the player tries to knock out rocket launchers and jeeps with a small plastic tank. The museum also features Soviet pinball tables, ice-hockey games for two and four players, a target shooting game called “Sniper” and early video games with titles like “Gorodki” and “Skachki” (Horse Race).
    Real gamers are welcome to play every day:
    Monday through Sunday from 11 till 8 p.m.

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