St.Isaac's Cathedral, Saint Petersburg

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  • St.Isaac's Cathedral
    by easterntrekker
  • St.Isaac's Cathedral
    by easterntrekker
  • St.Isaac's Cathedral
    by easterntrekker
  • Canadienne's Profile Photo

    St. Isaac's Cathedral (Part II)

    by Canadienne Updated Jun 7, 2003

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    St. Isaac's Cathedral

    The interior of the church is decorated with blue (lapis lazuli) and green (malachite) columns, stained glass, coloured marble and a collection of religious paintings and statues.

    The interior also holds an interesting scaled, cut-away model of the church and the system of winches that were used to raise the columns into place (each one weighs 114 tonnes).

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  • Canadienne's Profile Photo

    St. Isaac's Cathedral (View)

    by Canadienne Updated Jun 7, 2003

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    View from St. Isaac's Cathedral

    This is the northern view from the St. Isaac's dome: the spire in the foreground is of the Admiralty, home to the Naval Engineering School. The second spire, in the distance, is that of Peter & Paul's Cathedral.

    Off to the right of the photo is the Hermitage (the green and white building is the Winter Palace).

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  • Canadienne's Profile Photo

    St. Isaac's Cathedral (View II)

    by Canadienne Updated Jun 7, 2003

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    View from St. Isaac's Cathedral

    The southern view from the dome is over St. Isaac's Square (Isaakievskaya ploschad). From left to right: the Astoria Hotel (dark grey) and St. Petersburg's City Hall (green roof) housed in the Mariinsky Palace.

    In the centre of the photo, in front of the City Hall and overlooking the green space of the square, stands a statue of Nicholas I.

    There are several benches in the square ~ it makes a lovely spot to admire the surroundings. Mom wasn't up for the stairclimb, but I caught her attention and waved from the dome.

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  • Canadienne's Profile Photo

    St. Isaac's Square

    by Canadienne Written Jun 7, 2003

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    Monument to Nicholas I, St. Isaac's Square

    A closer look at the equestrian statue of Nicholas I. Erected in 1859, the Tsar and his horse stand on a base that is decorated with scenes from his reign as well images of Justice, Strength, Faith and Wisdom. The qualities are embodied with the faces of his wife and daughters.

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  • Gwynethart's Profile Photo

    St. Isaac's Cathedral

    by Gwynethart Written Mar 26, 2005

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    St. Isaac's Cathedral

    This structure dominates St. Isaac's Square, and what struck me most about it was the contrast between the rough appearance of the stone and the shiny gold of the domes. The square and the cathedral were so named in honor of St. Isaac of Dlmatia whose feast day is on 30 May, which is also the date when the birthday of Peter the Great is celebrated. It was built between 1818 and 1858, by the French-born architect Auguste Montferrand.

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  • Lalique's Profile Photo

    The Dome

    by Lalique Updated Nov 11, 2003

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    conquering the hights

    As I already mentioned one can climb the Dome of the Cathedral and enjoy from up there a mangnificent skyline of the city....
    The spiral staircase that leads up is a smaller version of the one in St. Peter and Paul in Vatican, in the end one has to take a metal shaky bridge/staircase, which you can see on the pic, but all the efforts will be highly renumerated.... believe me! :))

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    One of the Largest Domed Structures

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 25, 2010

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    Dome
    4 more images

    After we visited St. Peter and Paul's Fortress, we went to St. Isaac's Cathedral where they do still have services. I said - there's not room for that many people unless they all stand. And the guide said - we don't sit during services. So that explained that.

    St. Isaac's Cathedral is one of Russia's most famous churches and is extensively decorated with detailed mosaic icons, paintings and columns made of malachite and lapis lazuli. It is the largest cathedral in Russia and it was built between 1818 and 1858, by the French-born architect Auguste Montferrand. It is dedicated to Saint Isaac of Dalmatia, a patron saint of Peter the Great who had been born on the feast day of that saint.

    Inside were models of the previous buildings on the site (photo 2) and the current cathedral (photo 4). Foreign visitors should buy entrance tickets just inside the right-hand door in the southern facade (not at the street-level ticket booth).

    Open: Thursday to Tuesday, 11am to 7pm, last admission is at 6pm
    The Colonnade observation point is open: Thursday to Tuesday, 11am to 6pm, last admission is at 5pm
    Closed: Wednesdays

    Although the website says there is no photography inside, I obviously did not find that to be the case.

    This was our last stop before we went back to the ship.

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  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    San Isaac ( 1 )

    by elpariente Updated Jul 16, 2012

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    Se construyó una pequeńa iglesia de madera en 1710 por orden de Pedro I , que recibió el nombre de San Isaac de Dalmacia, pues era el santo que se celebraba del día de su cumpleaños .
    Esta iglesia fue reconstruida varias veces( 4 ) , hasta que Alejandro 1 decidió en 1817 hacer una de las iglesias más grande del mundo y encargársela al arquitecto Francés Montferrand
    El exterior es de estilo Neo Clásico , hecho según la tradición Ruso-Bizantina con una planta en cruz griega , con una cúpula central y cuatro más pequeñas
    Fue una obra de ingeniería digna de analizar , en la que colaboró el Ingeniero español , canario , Antonio Bethancourt y de la que se puede destacar :
    - Como era un terreno pantanoso fue necesario clavar 10.000 pilotes de madera para hacer los cimientos
    - Tiene 112 columnas , de 67 toneladas de granito rojo y Antonio Bethancourt estudió un sistema de andamios para elevarlas hasta 40 metros
    - Para dorar la cúpula ,que tiene 21,8 m de diámetro, se emplearon 100 kilos de oro y una técnica parecida a la pintura con spray que utilizaba mercurio y generaba vapores muy tóxicos
    - La cúpula está construida en metal y tiene tres capas como si fuera una "matrioska", para asegurar el aislamiento térmico y conseguir una acústica perfecta

    An small wooden churchwas built in 1710 by order of Peter I, that was named St. Isaac of Dalmatia, who was the saint celebrated on his birthday.
    This church was rebuilt several times (4), until Alexander 1 decided in 1817 to build one of the world's largest churches and he asked the construction to the French architect Montferrand
    The outside is Neo Classical style, made following the Russian-Byzantine tradition with a Greek cross plan , with a central dome and four smaller
    It was an engineering work that is worthy to analyse, where the Spanish engineer, from Canary Islands , Antonio Bethancourt colaborated , and we may indicate the following tasks :
    - As it was a swamp it had to drive 10,000 wooden trunks for the foundations
    - It has 112 columns, of 67 tons each , of red granite and Antonio Bethancourt studied a system of scaffolding to raise them up to 40 meters
    - To gild the dome , that is 21.8 m in diameter, were used 100 kgs of gold and a technique similar to that used for spray paint using mercury that generated very toxic gases
    - The dome is built with metal and has three layers as a "Matrioska" to secure the thermal insulation and to get a perfect acoustic

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  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    The biggest church in St. Petersburg

    by MichaelFalk1969 Written Sep 25, 2006

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    This orthodox cathedral is stunningly large - the biggest church in St. Petersburg and one of the biggest churches in the world as well. The only suitable (catholic) equivalent would be St. Peters Cathedral in Rome. The interior is magnificent, with mosaics depicting biblical scenes all over the place. Compared to orthodox churches, even some of the most prominent baroque catholic churches look rather simple.

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  • cbeaujean's Profile Photo

    st isaac's cathedral,star in the city skyline

    by cbeaujean Updated Mar 7, 2003

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    st isaac's cathedral

    an unknown (in 1818) architect,called richard de montferrand,won a competition organised by alexander I to build the cathedral.it was so long (to 1858!)that the succesor nicholas Ist wanted a more grandiose church than the original one....
    reopened in 1990,after a 62 years closing.

    for non russian,very expensive entry!

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  • filip007's Profile Photo

    St Isaac cathedral

    by filip007 Written Nov 13, 2007

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    St Isaac cathedral

    An imposing sight from all the center of the town, it was designed (as usual in St Petersburg) by a french architect Richard de Montferrand.

    The actual building is bigger than the original design so that it became one of the greatest cathedrals in the world and took also 40 years to build between 1818 to 1858. And this huge mass (300.000 tons) is standing on a swamp...

    While it was a museum of atheism during soviet era, today it is still a museum, but nothing to do with atheism anymore...

    Besides the interior, you can also climb to the tower with great views on St Petersburg.

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  • Zirpsis's Profile Photo

    More massive than you'd expect

    by Zirpsis Written Aug 22, 2007

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    2 more images

    You can only grasp the vastness of this church when you're inside and you can understand why it took over 40 years to build. For instance, the massive red granite columns are really huge and they each are made of one piece of rock. If you want to take pictures inside, remember to buy a permit and also remember to turn the flashlight off.

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  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    St. Isaacs Cathedral

    by MikeAtSea Written Feb 20, 2005

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    St. Isaacs Cathedral

    This is the biggest Russian Orthodox Cathedral in St. Petersburg and its origin goes back to the year 1710 when a small wodden church was built on the place where the church can be seen today. In 1818 Alexander I approved a plan to build the current cathedral, however it took almost 40 years to finish it.

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  • Lalique's Profile Photo

    St. Isaac Cathedral

    by Lalique Updated Dec 19, 2002

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    Some of the pics in this Must see section was taken by single use camera I borrowed from the hotel fridge, so don't judge the quality.... you know how these cameras shoot, heh....
    I was so overwelmed with emotions being back in St. P after 12 or more years, that I didn't care much about the photo device, I just rushed like a headless chicken around the streets, taking pictures and not noticing that it was -20C outside....

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  • Leipzig's Profile Photo

    St. Isaac's Cathedral

    by Leipzig Updated Sep 24, 2003

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    St. Isaac's Cathedral

    The church was built by the Auguste Montferrand, a French architect. The construction took 40 years (1818-1858). The interior was made of granite and offers a place for 14 thousand people. Now it is a museum and worships are held only on major occasions.

    The golden cupola of St. Isaac's can be seen from almost every place in St. Petersburg. If you do not shy to climb up the 300 stairs you will be fascinated by a breathtaking view over the city.

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