St.Peter and St.Paul's Fortress, Saint Petersburg

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  • St.Peter and St.Paul's Fortress
    by fachd
  • St.Peter and St.Paul's Fortress
    by elpariente
  • St.Peter and St.Paul's Fortress
    by smirnofforiginal
  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    The cathedrals in peter and Paul fortress

    by mallyak Written Dec 4, 2010

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    The whole fortress is a museum complex with quite a few different museums housed in its different structures, of which Sts Peter & Paul’s Cathedral is definitely the most important one. You can get to the fortress by either one of the two bridges connecting it to the mainland, and tickets can be booked in the booking office inside the small yellow and white structure in the cathedral square.

    The 18th-century gilded wood carved iconostasis is the most impressive part of the cathedral. Make sure you bring your camera to photograph it (picture-taking is free). Generally, you do not need longer than 15 or 20 minutes to see the inside

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    Tombs of the Tsars

    by mallyak Written Dec 4, 2010

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    If you are interested in seeing the tombs of the Russian tsars, the Peter and Paul Fortress is the place to visit. It is the city’s historical center, located on a small island within walking distance from Gorkovskaya metro station.
    Inside, it looks much more spectacular compared to its rather plain outside appearance. The marble tombs of the Tsars and members of the royal family are all alike. Nicholas and Alexandra, the last Russian emperors, are in a small chapel right of the entrance (their remains were buried in the same grave with their children’s remains). Peter the Great and Catherine the Great are at the opposite side of the cathedral, right of the iconostasis.

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    Cathedral of SS Peter & Paul

    by mallyak Written Dec 4, 2010

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    The Peter and Paul Cathedral, located inside the fortress, is the burial place of the tsars and the tallest historical building (122 m/400 ft) in the city. The headquarters of Saint Petersburg’s municipal government are located in the Mariinsky Palace, which was built in 1844 on Saint Isaac's Square in the Admiralty district for Emperor Nicholas I’s daughter Maria. Also on Saint Isaac’s Square is the Cathedral of Saint Isaac, which was built between 1768 and 1858. Far to the east of the Admiralty district is the Smolny Institute, founded by Catherine the Great in the 1700s to serve as a boarding school for upper-class girls. The current building—built to replace the original structure in the early 1800s—housed the first Soviet government from the time it took power in October (or November, in the Western, or New Style, calendar) 1917 until March 1918.

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    Great people watching!

    by dustmon Updated Aug 22, 2010

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    out in the plaza
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    One of the first things we did after getting settled on our ship (Viking Cruises) was view and then visit the Peter and Paul Fortress---not really what it sounds but really cool---see photo of the lovers out front! Beautiful monument on the river---great start to our St Petersburg visit!

    closed on tuesdays

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  • alectrevor's Profile Photo

    Final resting place of last Czar.

    by alectrevor Written May 8, 2010

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    Crypt.remains of last Czar & family.
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    The Peter And Paul Fortress is on an island across the river Neva from The Hermitage. A combined ticket for all entries is best only if you intend to see all attractions, which could take all day. I was only really interested in St Peter and Paul cathedral so single entry ticket was best.80 years after their execution by the bolshevicks the last Czar and his family were buried in St Petersburgs Peter and Paul Cathedral in 1998.

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    St. Petersburg Fortress - A Good Starting Point

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 25, 2010

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    Driving into the Fortress
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    This was the first building in Peter's new capitol. Peter built a fort on a small island in the Neva delta to protect the area from possible attack by the Sweden. The day that it was started - May 27, 1703 (May 16 according to the old calendar) became the birthday of the city of St Petersburg.

    Ironically, although it was originally built for defense (hence the name Fortress), from 1721 onwards the fortress housed part of the city's garrison and rather notoriously served as a high security political jail. Among the first inmates was Peter's own rebellious son Alexei. Later, the list of famous residents included Dostoyevsky, Gorkiy, Trotsky and Lenin's older brother, Alexander. No prisoner ever escaped.

    Our driver had a pass to drive into the fort and park inside, which put us much nearer the scene of action, but we still had to walk some. We walked in the Sally Port and across to the Peter and Paul Cathedral, where the Tsars are buried.

    The Cathedral was the first church in the city to be built of stone. On top of the cathedrals’ gilded spire stands a magnificent golden angel holding a cross (photo 3). This weathervane is one of the most prominent symbols of St Petersburg, and at 404 feet tall, the cathedral is the highest building in the city.

    Open: 10:00 - 18:00 Closed on WED and on the last TUE of every month.
    An admission fee is charged for the cathedral and the museum which our guide paid

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Peter and Paul Fortress

    by HORSCHECK Updated Jan 18, 2010

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    Peter and Paul Fortress
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    The construction of the Peter and Paul Fortress on 27. May 1703 marks the birthday of St. Petersburg.

    It is the city's oldest structure and was built by Peter the Great to protect the area from possible attacks. Instead of being used as a defensive fortress it finally became a prison for political enemies of the Tsars and the Soviets.

    Directions:
    The Peter and Paul Fortress is situated on a small island in the Neva Delta (Metro: Gorkovskaya).

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  • Nuclei's Profile Photo

    Peter and Paul Cathedral

    by Nuclei Written Oct 28, 2009

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    Peter and Paul Cathedral
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    The oldest church in St. Petersburg, history of the city and to the Romanov dynasty. Bell tower is the tallest structure, if you exclude the TV tower. Construced inside the fortress. The cathedral is dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul, the patron saints of the fortress.

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    Walking the the riverbanks toward the Fortress

    by jumpingnorman Written Sep 5, 2008

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    Follow the River Moyki towards bigger Neva River
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    During a city highlight tour, I was brought to the Peter and Paul Fortress to go into the cathedral and visit the cathedral were ALL the emperors were entombed, including Peter the Great himself who chose a spot close to the altar on the far right side if you're facing altar(with a small bust of him). But if time allows, I suggest you walk to the fortress yourself. If coming from Nevsky prospect, just go towards the Moyki River and walk along it's banks to the direction of the Neva river...just follow the river. This would take maybe about 45minutes and over an hour because you will be stopping to take pictures along the bank...when you reach the big Trinity bridge, go on it and that will lead you to the fortress. We drove past that big bridge and I wanted to walk on it and it was a great walk. At the Fortress, get a ticket (100 rubles or 4 USD) to go up onto the walks at the periphery - these walks are well above ground and give a stunning view of the Neva River and you can see the churches, the Hermitage and other buildings of course the powerful fountain on the river itself. People sunbathe and swim but I do not advise this because water pollution has been a problem here from what I hear. And there is a small sandy beach at the side of the fortress. I also video-ed a helicopter landing on a boat to release its passengers --- you hold your breath and wonder if it is going to land safely and on-target...

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  • Zirpsis's Profile Photo

    Fortress

    by Zirpsis Updated Jun 20, 2008

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    Beautiful! Peter the Great had this fortress built at the beginning of the 18th century against possible attacks by Sweden. However, it has not been needed for that. Instead, there are the last resting places of some of the Romanov family members.

    The outer rim of the fortress is the place where the townspeople of St. Peterburg come to sunbathe where the thick walls give shelter against the wind. I even saw someone go for a swim in the river Neva.

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  • mingul's Profile Photo

    St Peter and Paul Cathedral

    by mingul Written Apr 5, 2008

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    St Peter and Paul Cathedral
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    This Cathedral is situaded on the Petrograd side across the river Neva. It is build in a Baroque style and will be crowded as all the main objectives from St.Petersburg

    From this area, a cannon is fired at noon, every day.

    Admission in the fortress will be free, but all the objectives inside will have an entrance fee.

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  • Santini738's Profile Photo

    Peter and Paul Fortress

    by Santini738 Written Dec 31, 2007

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    Peter and Paul Fortress
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    The Peter and Paul Fortress is the original citadel of St. Petersburg, Russia, designed by Domenico Trezzini and founded in 1703. The fortress contains a number of buildings including the Peter and Paul Cathedral, where all Russian tsars from Peter I to Alexander III are interred; the remains of the Imperial martyrs, Nicholas II and his family and entourage, were also interred there, in the side St.Catherine's Chapel, on the 80th anniversary of their deaths, July 17, 1998. Towards the end of 2006, the remains of Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna, mother of the murdered Nicholas II, who died in 1928 were brought from Roskilde Cathedral outside Copenhagen, Denmark to finally rest next to her husband, Alexander III. The newer Grand Ducal Mausoleum is connected to the cathedral by a corridor. The latest burial there was of Nicholas II's first cousin once removed, Grand Duke Vladimir Cyrilovich, son of Grand Duke Cyril Vladimirovitch. Other structures inside the fortress include the still functioning Mint building, the Trubetskoy bastion and the City Museum.

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  • brazwhazz's Profile Photo

    Nevskaya Panorama

    by brazwhazz Written Dec 22, 2007

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    Commandant's House and Peter and Paul Cathedral

    Nevskaya Panorama is an elevated promenade that was opened in 2000. It allows visitors to walk from the southeastern corner of the fortress to the Naryshkin Bastion, where a cannon is fired at noon every day.

    You do not need to go here to get good views across the Neva River, since you can walk on the beach between the fortress walls and the river for free; however, what makes the reasonable fee (60 roubles per person, if I remember correctly) worth it are the views inside the fortress.

    The Nevskaya Panorama is accessible from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

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    The beach at the Peter and Paul Fortress

    by brazwhazz Written Dec 22, 2007

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    Cool sand sculpture
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    Thanks to its location along the Neva River, the Peter and Paul Fortress also has its own... beach! The only thing more surprising was the fact that the day of our visit, there was a sand castle competition.

    We also learnt that the beach is not only popular in summer: come winter time, some locals cut holes through the ice and swim in them. Whatever the season, there are great views to be had across the Neva River, especially if you don't feel like paying the entrance fee to the Nevskaya Panorama (access to the higher level) inside the fortress.

    To reach the beach, simply walk through the Nevsky Gate (Nevskaya Vorota) on the south side of the fortress wall.

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    Statue of Peter the Great

    by brazwhazz Written Dec 22, 2007

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    A unique representation of Peter the Great

    Erected in 1991, Mikhail Shemyakin's statue of Peter the Great is one of the newest, and most popular, attractions inside the Peter and Paul Fortress. On sunny, summer days, both Russians and foreigners line up for the chance to get their photo taken with the statue.

    There are many stories about the statue, but the most common one is that by altering the proportions of Peter the Great's head and hands, Shemyakin wanted to show the double-edged personality of the city's founder: on the one hand, he was a great reformer; on the other, he was ruthless and cruel.

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