Grassalkovich Palace, Bratislava

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  • Grassalkovich palace
    Grassalkovich palace
    by Odiseya
  • Grassalkovich palace
    Grassalkovich palace
    by Odiseya
  • Fun in the fountain (switched off for winter)
    Fun in the fountain (switched off for...
    by leics
  • Odiseya's Profile Photo

    Presidential palace

    by Odiseya Written Feb 16, 2014
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    Popular palace from 1790 known as Grassalkovich palace (Slovak: GRASSALKOVICHOV PALÁC) after its first owner now is official residence of Slovak President and that is from 1996.

    It is not opened to the public. Exception was the special events.
    In front of the building there is a fountain in a shape of the Earth as a symbol of freedom. Note that fountain working only during day.

    Nowadays the palace is guarded by the Honor guard of president. It was not been case during my visit of city.

    It have also and beautiful garden on Hodžovo Square and its open for public but access is restricted by its opening hours. So, you could visit presidential garden all year long:
    January – March: Mon-Sun: 10:00-19:00
    April – May: Mon-Sun: 10:00-20:00
    June – September: Mon-Sun: 8:00-22:00
    October – December: Mon-Sun: 10:00-19:00

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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    President's palace

    by Raimix Updated Dec 15, 2013

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    President's palace is known also as Grassalkovich palace, as it was constructed for Count Antal Grassalkovich, a Hungarian noble in 1760. It was modeled in late Baroque - Rococo style. It also has a French garden nearby, opened for public.

    It was known for Baroque music, Joseph Haydn played some of his works here. It was a president palace for the First Slovak Republic, and from 1996 after renovations it has the same status for a new Republic.

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    Grassalkovičov palác - Grassalkovich Palace

    by grayfo Updated Feb 19, 2013

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    Grassalkovich Palace or the Presidential Palace is the home of the President of Slovakia. The building is a Rococo/late Baroque summer palace and was built in 1760 for the Count Anton Grassalkovich who was a close advisor of Empress Maria Theresa. The palace was often used by the aristocracy for social events and concerts.

    July 2007

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    Watch the changing of the guard.

    by leics Updated Nov 2, 2012

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    On the way to the change...
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    I came across this quite unexpectedly: I just happened to be passing at the right time of day. At 10am, actually, though I'm sure the guard outside Grassalkovich Palace changes regularly throughout the day...perhaps every 2 hours (that's long enough to stand still, I think?).

    The guards aren't there when darkness has fallen (the palace was right next to my hotel so I passed it regularly) and there was a serious chap-in-a-suit-with-an-earpiece walking around the entrance courtyard all the time in the daytime. I think he was the real security, rather than the guards!

    But I loved the slightly-Ruritanian uniforms they wore, and was impressed by the accuracy of their change. Two guards plus an officer marched beautifully in step around the courtyard, faced the pair on duty, produced some nifty co-ordinated footwork, changed places and then the 'retiring' guards marched solemnly offstage and into the hidden spaces of the palace proper.

    I particularly enjoyed the sword worn by the officer...and the way guards and officer were all wearing 'uniform' sunglasses!

    Worth timing your visit to the palace grounds just to see this happen, I think. :-)

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    Lovely grounds....

    by leics Written Nov 2, 2012

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    Fun in the fountain (switched off for winter)
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    The grounds of Grassalkovich Palace are open to the public (hours vary) for free, even though Slovakia's President still lives in the palace itself.

    I very much enjoyed wandering the tree-filled green space, and it was clearly a popular spot with locals too: plenty of dog-walkers and courting couples, mothers and grandmothers with children (there is a good play area) and elderly folk simply sitting in the sunshine and watching the world go by. Although there were no flowers when I visited in late October, I'm sure the flowerbeds are lovely at the right time of year.

    There sre some interesting bits of sculpture in the grounds too: three naked girls having great fun in a fountain, a rather odd sort-of-early-railway-engine (I think), a row of young trees which seem to have been planted by famous visitors to the palace (each with its own plaque) ...and another plaque to mark the fact that the first electric lights in Bratislava illuminated the palace grounds in 1878.

    The palace building dates from 1760, built for Hungarian Count Anton Grassalcovitch. In the intervening years it has fulfilled several roles including being the base for Territorial Military Command from 1919 and serving as what seems to be a sort of residential activity centre for the young 'Pioneers' from 1950.

    It's a lovely spot for a relaxing wander, or a sit-down in the sunshine. Well worth seeking out.

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  • Rupanworld's Profile Photo

    Grassalkovich Presidential Palace

    by Rupanworld Written Dec 26, 2008

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    The Grassalkovich palace was built as the summer residence of Count Anton Grasalkovic in the 1760s near the city walls of Bratislava. A decade later much modifications and extensions were made to it. The palace was frequently visited by the Empress Maria Theresa. Today it is the seat of the President of Slovakia. It had a huge garden behind it, which has now been converted into a public park. The garden is really beautiful, but entrance to it closes at around 4.30 PM and I was late by 1 minute and could not go in. That's a pity. I wish I could. It is so beautiful.

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  • Christine_D's Profile Photo

    Grassalkovich Palace

    by Christine_D Written Aug 19, 2008

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    Grassalkovich Palace

    The Grassalkovich Palace is the seat of the President of the Slovak Repunlic and the perfect place to start a city walking tour. You get there with bus 93, the 2nd station after the railway station Bratislava Hlavna stanica.

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    Grassalkovich Palace and Park

    by Airpunk Updated Jul 2, 2008

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    Bratislava’s equivalent to Buckingham palace, also has two non-smiling guards placed in front of it and a flag when its inhabitant is in the house. But as Slovakia is not a kingdom, it’s the slovak president who calls Grassalkovich Palace his Official seat. A second difference I noted was the absence of the guards. They were there sometimes - and sometimes not. I haven't noticed any rules about how and when to find them...
    The palace dates back to 1760 and was built for Count Grassalkovich, who wanted to have a bigger residence outside of the then-existing city walls. In the WWII years, it already served as a presidential palace, but then the communist regime turned it into a house for youth organisations. After a refurbishment in the early 1990s, it became the presidential palace again. Its gardens are open to the public and are one of the most popular parks in Bratislava. On the small square in front of the palace, you’ll see a globe-shaped fountain as well as several flowerbeds.

    The park behing the palace is a popular recreation area. Even in winter, you see many people there. When coming from the western entrance, check out the plaque mentioning the first electric power line in Bratislava.

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    Grassalkovich Palace – Changing the Guard

    by grayfo Written Mar 7, 2008

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    Guarding the Presidential Palace are the Special Presidential Corps, dressed in traditional uniform. The changing of the Guard has all the pomp and circumstance that is expected of a time honoured tradition.

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Grassalkovich Palace

    by HORSCHECK Updated Jan 15, 2006

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    Grassalkovich Palace

    The Grassalkovich Palace was built in 1760 and is nowadays the representative seat of the president of Slovakia. The entrance to the building is guarded by two blue-suited men. When the flag is hoisted, then the president is at least in town.

    Direction:
    The Grassalkovich Palace is located at Hodzovo namestie 1, just between the Old Town and the train station.

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  • Grassalkovich Palace

    by Mariajoy Written Aug 17, 2005

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    Grassalkovich palace

    We walked away from the station in the general direction waved by the Australian girl who was leaving for Warsaw that night - she said *oh it's about a 20 minute walk over there*. So we went *over there* and found an illuminated building which I later learned was the Grassalkovich Palace

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  • Evica's Profile Photo

    Grassalkovicov palac

    by Evica Written Jun 4, 2004
    grasalkovicov palac

    Grassalkovich palace is mentioned in the literature like suburb of the city in 18th century. Now it is the seat of president and it is mostly representative building. There is a wonderful garden connected to the palace where you can take a rest in summertime.

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  • micas_pt's Profile Photo

    Grassalkovich Palace

    by micas_pt Written Dec 3, 2003

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    This huge and beautiful Baroque Palace is nowadays the official residence of Slovakia’s President. It was built in the 18th century when Count Grassalkovich decided, as some other noblemen, to live outside the city walls, since they though they would have more space outside in the “open spaces”. Nowadays, city bustles around this palace, a sign of changing time.

    Being an official residence you can’t visit the palace rooms, but you can visit the French gardens, that are a major part of this complex.

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  • Skipka's Profile Photo

    Grassalkovicov Palac

    by Skipka Updated Jul 29, 2003

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    grasalkovich

    Well, my first impression is always the most influent :) and this is the place where I have been going every Friday to art workshop when I was small kid. At that time it wasn't the seat of president as recently and there you should go inside and see all those nice rooms and decorations. On the other hand, I agree that it is suitable for president for representative purposes :) Especially the garden behind looks really great and it is a good place where to have a rest for a while.
    Imagine that in this garden used to be a swimming pool around 60th of last century, so my mom went swimming there. Now, no one can believe that :)))
    In September (I can't remember the precise date) there is "Open door Day" and you can go inside like to museum but it is always so crowdy and full of noise ;) so I am happy enough I have seen it as a child exploring all the corners around. When I have a look on that big balcony now I remember how there had stood "DEDO MRAZ" (something like santa Claus) and Snowhite and given small gitfs to children. So, and then people on the bus stop look at me I am mad when I am smiling watching that balcony ;)))

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  • grayfo's Profile Photo

    Grassalkovich Palace - Gardens

    by grayfo Written Mar 17, 2008

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    The palace’s once-large gardens are now a public park, complete with a statue of Bratislava-born composer Jan Nepomuk Hummel.

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