Primate's Palace, Bratislava

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  • Primate's Palace
    Primate's Palace
    by tim07
  • Primate's Palace: Courtyard
    Primate's Palace: Courtyard
    by HORSCHECK
  • Primate's Palace
    Primate's Palace
    by HORSCHECK
  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Primate's palace

    by Raimix Updated Dec 15, 2013

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    Palace was built in classical style, in 1778 - 1781. It was actually was used mainly for archbishop. It is famous for an important event, that took place here in 1805 - fourth Peace of Pressburg was signed, after the battle of Austerlitz. After so many years, the Holy Roman Empire ended its existence.

    Nowadays palace is used for Bratislava mayor and opened to public. I think it is one of the most beautiful old buildings in Bratislava.

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    Primacialny Palace - Primates Palace

    by grayfo Updated May 21, 2013

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    The Palace was designed for the Cardinal Joseph Bátthány, Archbishop of Esztergom and Primate of Hungary in 1781, this palace is one of the architectural jewels of Slovakia.

    Its pale pink and white exterior is topped with various marble statues and a large cast iron cardinal’s hat. The hat is a symbol of the Archbishop, for whom the palace was built, and of the various cardinals who lived here throughout the years.

    It was here on 26th December 1805 in the Hall of Mirrors that Napoleon signed the Pressburg Peace Treaty after being defeated at the Battle of Austerlitz

    Today, the palace houses part of the Municipal Museum, and has an excellent collection of 17th century English Tapestries, which were found hidden in the palace.

    Tuesday to Sunday: 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

    July 2007

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  • Skipka's Profile Photo

    Archbishop's Summer Palace

    by Skipka Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    the seat of slovak government

    The first Archbishop's residence stood on this place from 1614. It was something like a country house for Archbishop Forgac and later Archbishop Esterhazy rebuilt it to Palace. Well, actually he didn't make it, his peasants did. :) The present form of it is the work of Archbishop Barkoczy. There is a chapel built in 1740. Decorations and frescoes were painted by Galli-Bibiena. There are mixture of barocco and roccoco and all its masters would like to buolt a luxurious palace. But when the Archbishop's office moved to the Estergom there was no money for this luxury. (such as nowadays). In the revolutionary years (1848-49) it served like a hospital and this status was kept till 1938. Later it was completely restored and adapted for administrative purposes. Today it is the seat of the Office of the Government of the Slovak Republic.

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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    The Primate’s Palace

    by mallyak Written Dec 20, 2010

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    The Primate’s Palace was built by the architect M. Hefele in 1778-1781. The Palace, also known as the Palace of Archbishop of Estergom, was the temporal residence of the president of the Slovak Republic till 1996. The Palace is also famous because in 1805 Napoleon Bonaparte and Francis I of Hapsburg signed the Pressburg Truce in 1805, in its Mirror Hall.

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  • Rupanworld's Profile Photo

    Primacialne namestie

    by Rupanworld Written Dec 26, 2008

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    One of the most beautiful squares of the Old town in Bratislava is the Primacialne namestie. There is a big, pink building there that dominates the entire area and it is the Primate's Palace (the Catholic Archbishop's palace). This Palace dates back to the end of the 18th century and the Treaty of Pressburg was signed between France and Austria after the Battle of Austerlitz in 1805 in this palace. There is a museum inside.
    And yes, one important piece of information. If you are carrying your laptop on your trip to Bratislava, please be informed that you get free wireless network in this square and can access your emails and the internet for FREE here!!!

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  • easterntrekker's Profile Photo

    Primaciálne námestie square

    by easterntrekker Written Sep 11, 2008

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    Comparatively young buildings surround Primaciálne námestie square (The Primatial square), with the oldest house not less than four hundred years. The Primatial Palace, occupies the whole southern side of the Primatial square, is considered the most beautiful in Bratislava. It was built in the years 1778-1781 on the site of an older Archbishops palace.

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Primate's Palace

    by Airpunk Written Jun 25, 2008

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    Primate's Palace

    Between 1778 and 1781, it was building for the bishop of Estergom. This palace took its place in history when the Pressburg peace treaty was signed in it after Austria has lost the battle of Austerlitz. A couple of other important treaties and laws were signed here too, including the abolition of serfdom in Hungary. The palace is open to the public and beside the usual contemporary furniture, you will see some english tapestries from the mid-17th century. Today, Primate’s Palace is part of the city hall and a part of it is used as a place for official or cultural events.

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    An absolute must see.

    by planxty Written Dec 29, 2006

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    Primates Palace, Bratislava, Slovakia.
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    Whilst in Bratislava, you simply must see the Primate's Palace. It is a stunning pink neoclassical building, as you can see from the photo, with various statues set atop it. the main entrance gives onto an enclosed courtyard (see second photo).

    The building was completed in 1781 as a resdidence for the Hungarian archbishop. At the time bratislava was called Pressburg and was part of the Hungary, although power was gradually being moved to Buda (Budapest) and so the building only sporadically housed the subsequent primates. It did, however, serve as a home for various members of royalty.

    In 1903, the Church decided to sell the building for the large sum of 120,000 Hungarian crowns and the city bought it, primarily as a much needed "extension" to the town Hall. During renovation work, six English tapestries of fine quality dating from the 17th century depicting the legend of Hero and Leandro were discovered and are displayed. To this day, no-one knows how they came to be there.

    From the moment you enter the Palace, everything exudes opulence. The grand staircases lead to the magnificent Mirror Hall, still used to host ceremonies. you then travel through a series of colour themed drawing rooms simply full of artistic treasures, notably the furniture. Look out for the huge ceramic "radiators" in every room as well as the wallpaper, which is actually taughtened fabric stretched over frames.

    Next come a series of rooms with other objets d'art, including a room of Dutch Masters. I'm no expert, but I did spot a Brueghel.

    Finally, you reach a balocny overlooking the wonderful Ladislaus Chapel. Take a look up at the wonderful ceiling.

    All in all, well worth the small 50SKK entrance fee.

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  • hawkhead's Profile Photo

    Primatial Palace

    by hawkhead Written Nov 17, 2006

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    Houses a collection of Mortlake Tapestries, plus a collection of mostly horrid paintings. However, the building is worth a visit, as are the tapestries. You can also look down on the Ludwig (?) chapel. Entrance fee is equiavelent of 80p which is a bargain. The loos are terrific and for that alone are worth the entrance!

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  • MLW20's Profile Photo

    Primate Palace

    by MLW20 Updated Sep 18, 2006

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    The Primate Palace is an interesting building, On the top of the palace there is a black hat! The palace was built for the Archbishop of Esztergom in 1781.

    When you go inside there are nice tapestries hanging, the Hall of Mirrors where a peace treaty was signed by Napoleon, a chapel and a few other rooms with the original furniture.

    It is worth a quick stop but don't expect to be overly impressed.

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  • gosiaPL's Profile Photo

    Primate's Palace

    by gosiaPL Updated Jun 27, 2006

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    Primacialny Palac at the back of the Town Hall
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    This nice pink big palace can't be overlooked. Greatest attractions include the Hall of Mirrors (where Napoleon's treaty with Austria was signed) and the collection of 17th century's English tapestry. While you're there, look up high in order to spot the primate's hat on top of the palace - isn't this funny? And peep into the inner yard for the statue of St. George killing the dragon - always peep into inner yards! :-)
    The Primate's Palace dates back to the 18th century and was the seat of the Archbishops, and then the residence of Empress Maria Theresa who apparently loved it. The palace witnessed Napoleon signing the Peace Treaty with Austria in 1805, and it was also the residence of the Slovak President (until 1996) after Czechoslovakia split back into two separate republics. Now the palace is one of the buildings of the municipal authorities. That's a long story put short :-)

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    The Primate's Palace

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Apr 15, 2006

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    Fountain in the Primate's Palace

    I went to the Primate's Palace hoping to see lots and lots of monkeys and other primates. I was disappointed to find that primate can mean either monkey or a high bishop. I figured the Primate's Palace must've been named after the latter. After seeing the statue of the knight killing the dragon, I began to realize there must've been a huge dragon infestation in Europe back in the old days, and I'm glad they were all finally killed off by the brave knights of Bratislava.

    The Primate's Palace was completed in 1781 and has been Bratislava's town hall since the 1900s. It is noted for it's tapestry, Hall of Mirrors, and as the location of the signing of the Pressburg Treaty after the Battle of Austerlitz in 1805.

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  • kph100's Profile Photo

    Archbishops Palace

    by kph100 Written Jan 27, 2006

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    Archbishops Palace
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    This building designed by Viennese Architect Melchior Heffle was built between 1776-1781.

    In 1903 the city of Bratislava bought the palace and today it is the official mayors residence.

    In 1805 the "Peace of Pressburg" was signed in the Mirror Hall by Napoleon and Hapsburg Austria.

    I believe from memory it cost us in the region of ?2 to gain entry.

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Primate's Palace

    by HORSCHECK Updated Jan 15, 2006

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    Primate's Palace
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    The Classicist Primate's Palace (Primacialny palac) was built for the archbishop of Estergom (Jozef Bathyany) between 1778 and 1781.
    Austria and France signed the so called Peace of Pressburg in the Palace in 1805. Nowadays the palace is a part of Bratislava's City Hall.

    Directions:
    The Primate's Palace is situated behind the Old Town Hall, right in the centre of the Old Town.

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  • trisanna's Profile Photo

    Primate's Palace

    by trisanna Written Jan 14, 2006

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    Primate's Palace, Bratislava

    This is one of the most beautiful buildings in Bratislava and is worth coming to just to see the facade. But the inside is charming and lovely as well. The palace has a lovely collection of English tapestries. In the Hall of Mirrors, is where Napoleon and the Austrian Emperor Franz I signed the treaty of Pressburg (formerly Bratislava).

    Just to note, if you need a clean bathroom. This place has very nice, clean and free bathrooms. You don't need a ticket for admission for the bathrooms. The bathrooms are located before the ticket office/coat room.

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