Primate's Palace, Bratislava

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    Primate's Palace
    by tim07
  • Primate's Palace: Courtyard
    Primate's Palace: Courtyard
    by HORSCHECK
  • Primate's Palace
    Primate's Palace
    by HORSCHECK
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    Primate's Palace

    by HORSCHECK Updated Jan 15, 2006

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    Primate's Palace
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    The Classicist Primate's Palace (Primacialny palac) was built for the archbishop of Estergom (Jozef Bathyany) between 1778 and 1781.
    Austria and France signed the so called Peace of Pressburg in the Palace in 1805. Nowadays the palace is a part of Bratislava's City Hall.

    Directions:
    The Primate's Palace is situated behind the Old Town Hall, right in the centre of the Old Town.

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    Primate's Palace

    by acemj Updated Jun 18, 2005

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    The Primate's Palace, was built between 1777 and 1781 and is striking for its pink and marble exterior and neoclassical design. It was built for Cardinal Josef Batthyany, who also held the titles of Archbishop of Esztergom and Primate of Hungary. Today, the Primate's Palace is part of the Bratislava City Hall. In 1811, when the Bratislava Castle burned down, it was commonplace for members of the Hapsburg family to stay in the palace whenever they were visiting Bratislava.

    Perhaps the most famous event to ever take place in the palace occurred on December 26, 1805 when the Treaty of Pressburg was signed by Napolean Bonaparte (between France and Austria) in the palace's Hall of Mirrors, where a plaque commemorating the treaty can be seen today.

    The is open everyday except for holidays and special occasions and is accessible for a small fee. If you're only in Bratislava for a day from Vienna, make this one of your stops for sure.

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    The Primate’s Palace

    by mallyak Written Dec 20, 2010

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    The Primate’s Palace was built by the architect M. Hefele in 1778-1781. The Palace, also known as the Palace of Archbishop of Estergom, was the temporal residence of the president of the Slovak Republic till 1996. The Palace is also famous because in 1805 Napoleon Bonaparte and Francis I of Hapsburg signed the Pressburg Truce in 1805, in its Mirror Hall.

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    Archbishop's Summer Palace

    by Skipka Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    the seat of slovak government

    The first Archbishop's residence stood on this place from 1614. It was something like a country house for Archbishop Forgac and later Archbishop Esterhazy rebuilt it to Palace. Well, actually he didn't make it, his peasants did. :) The present form of it is the work of Archbishop Barkoczy. There is a chapel built in 1740. Decorations and frescoes were painted by Galli-Bibiena. There are mixture of barocco and roccoco and all its masters would like to buolt a luxurious palace. But when the Archbishop's office moved to the Estergom there was no money for this luxury. (such as nowadays). In the revolutionary years (1848-49) it served like a hospital and this status was kept till 1938. Later it was completely restored and adapted for administrative purposes. Today it is the seat of the Office of the Government of the Slovak Republic.

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    The Gate of The Office of Slovak Government

    by Skipka Written Nov 12, 2003

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    picture by Helen Vader http://www.helenvader.net

    This Gate remembers really much... It belongs to the Summer Palace of Arcibishop in Bratislava during the Austria-Hungaria Empire, then the seat of the government. Nowadays there are occasionally demonstrations in front of this palace when unsatisfied people want to influence government how to decide in some cases. However, it is peaceful here all the time because the government always do as it wish :) as in other countries as well...

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    Primacialne namestie

    by Rupanworld Written Dec 26, 2008

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    One of the most beautiful squares of the Old town in Bratislava is the Primacialne namestie. There is a big, pink building there that dominates the entire area and it is the Primate's Palace (the Catholic Archbishop's palace). This Palace dates back to the end of the 18th century and the Treaty of Pressburg was signed between France and Austria after the Battle of Austerlitz in 1805 in this palace. There is a museum inside.
    And yes, one important piece of information. If you are carrying your laptop on your trip to Bratislava, please be informed that you get free wireless network in this square and can access your emails and the internet for FREE here!!!

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    Primacialny Palace - Primates Palace

    by grayfo Updated May 21, 2013

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    The Palace was designed for the Cardinal Joseph Bátthány, Archbishop of Esztergom and Primate of Hungary in 1781, this palace is one of the architectural jewels of Slovakia.

    Its pale pink and white exterior is topped with various marble statues and a large cast iron cardinal’s hat. The hat is a symbol of the Archbishop, for whom the palace was built, and of the various cardinals who lived here throughout the years.

    It was here on 26th December 1805 in the Hall of Mirrors that Napoleon signed the Pressburg Peace Treaty after being defeated at the Battle of Austerlitz

    Today, the palace houses part of the Municipal Museum, and has an excellent collection of 17th century English Tapestries, which were found hidden in the palace.

    Tuesday to Sunday: 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

    July 2007

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    THE PRIMATE'S PALACE

    by STEFZAMM Updated Aug 2, 2005

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    Tapestries @ The Primate's Palace...

    This is my most favourite...

    It was built by architect M. Hefele in 1778 till the 1781. This palace is also known as the Archbishop's Palace. This palace was the residence of the Slovak President till 1996 when then the official residence moved to the Grassalkovich Palace.

    This Palace is very famous for its Hall of Mirrors and its Tapestries.

    The famous Hall of Mirrors saw alot of major historic events such as the Peace Treaty of Pressburg between Austria and France which was signed here in the year 1805 and also the opening session of the Hungarian Parliment until the city bought this palace in the year 1903.

    The most fascinating thing about this Palace is its unknown tapestries. Those tapestries were found folded behind the wall paper and they illustrate the tragic love of ancient Legend Hero and Leandros.

    These tapestries were woven in London in the 1630s and are today six beautiful pieces of art with a beautiful tragic love story that once you go through this palace and follow the story through these tapestries you will always remember the story of the poor Leandros...

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    Primate Palace

    by Skipka Written May 29, 2003

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    Primate Palace is that nice pink building in the centre just close to the Main Square. If you will go there and notice that big hat over the sculpture don't laugh.. It is the sign that in this building was the seat of cardinal. This building was probably hated by Napoleon because he was forced to sign up there the Peace Treaty with Prussia in 18CT. Well, he abreacted his anger on Bratislava Castle a bit ...
    Interior of this baroque building was also the seat of Empress Maria Theresa who loved Bratislava. She let there to built the Chappel and assisted in all decorations. :) I am sure ...
    You also can find there family pictures (as her own in the wedding dress that was heavy almost 40 kgs...

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    Primate Palace Interior

    by Skipka Written May 29, 2003

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    Interior is very nice and there is a gallery opened to everyone who will pay for ticket ;) Just one advice, if you're student, then you can enter for free. Avoid Mondays it is closed .. as all museums in Bratislava.
    Inside you can see the collection of goblins (tapiseries) telling the story of Hero and Leander. Their unhappy love and dramatical end of Leandro's life. It is unique collection of this art and there were some demands to buy it for some London's museum. So it is worth to see...

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    Primate Palace Interior 2

    by Skipka Written May 29, 2003

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    It is like a TV serie, huh? :) Well, I forgot to tell you that in one of the rooms once stood the piano and there was a lot of people in baroque clothes and ... one small kid walking to that piano. He played on it and then became famous. Yes, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart when he was 6.

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    Primate's Palace

    by Airpunk Written Jun 25, 2008

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    Primate's Palace

    Between 1778 and 1781, it was building for the bishop of Estergom. This palace took its place in history when the Pressburg peace treaty was signed in it after Austria has lost the battle of Austerlitz. A couple of other important treaties and laws were signed here too, including the abolition of serfdom in Hungary. The palace is open to the public and beside the usual contemporary furniture, you will see some english tapestries from the mid-17th century. Today, Primate’s Palace is part of the city hall and a part of it is used as a place for official or cultural events.

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    Primate's palace

    by Raimix Updated Dec 15, 2013

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    Palace was built in classical style, in 1778 - 1781. It was actually was used mainly for archbishop. It is famous for an important event, that took place here in 1805 - fourth Peace of Pressburg was signed, after the battle of Austerlitz. After so many years, the Holy Roman Empire ended its existence.

    Nowadays palace is used for Bratislava mayor and opened to public. I think it is one of the most beautiful old buildings in Bratislava.

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    Primatial Palace

    by hawkhead Written Nov 17, 2006

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    Houses a collection of Mortlake Tapestries, plus a collection of mostly horrid paintings. However, the building is worth a visit, as are the tapestries. You can also look down on the Ludwig (?) chapel. Entrance fee is equiavelent of 80p which is a bargain. The loos are terrific and for that alone are worth the entrance!

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    Primate Palace

    by MLW20 Updated Sep 18, 2006

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    The Primate Palace is an interesting building, On the top of the palace there is a black hat! The palace was built for the Archbishop of Esztergom in 1781.

    When you go inside there are nice tapestries hanging, the Hall of Mirrors where a peace treaty was signed by Napoleon, a chapel and a few other rooms with the original furniture.

    It is worth a quick stop but don't expect to be overly impressed.

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