TOLAR - Slovene currency, Ljubljana

4 Reviews

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  • Exchange counter at the train station
    Exchange counter at the train station
    by Willettsworld
  • Ljubljana City Savings Bank
    Ljubljana City Savings Bank
    by Willettsworld
  • Rare coins ?
    Rare coins ?
    by coceng
  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Money Exchangers

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 17, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ljubljana City Savings Bank
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: There's not that many money exchangers around the city centre. Your best bet is to go into a bank (which is what I did), such as the Ljubljana City Savings Bank on the pedestrian Copova ulica 3. There are also exchange counters at the train and bus stations.

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    Euros are accepted in many places.

    by antistar Written Mar 26, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: I don't think it will be long before Slovenians adopt the Euro, putting an end to their short lived, and slightly silly, currency. I mean that with all respect, because it's very quaint and I love carrying my Tolar notes around in my wallet to show people, but Slovenia must be one of the smallest countries in Europe with its own currency, but the one with the highest denominations. There are about 240 Tolari to the Euro, which makes for some very large numbers on the prices.

    In Ljubljana, as well as on the major roads of Slovenia and the popular tourist destinations like Bled and Postojna, Euros are accepted in many places. Not everywhere, the National History Museum for example did not, but many of the restaurants and bars did. Not only did they accept them, but they gave a very fair rate of exchange. Of course you are going to do better from a bank, but I didn't find anyone ripping us off, even though most tourists find the 240 to 1 ratio completely baffling. Usually if you pay in Euros, you get Tolari as change.

    You can also draw money out from any of the hundreds of ATMs around the city. All the ones I used had an English option, and many had more advanced functions than I'd seen in other countries. I was definitely able to use both my English Visa and Cirrus debit cards, I think I also used my German EC/Maestro card, but I am not 100% certain of that. I was charged about 3-5 euros per withdrawal, but the exchange rates used were always better than the tourist rate.

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    Commemorative Coins...

    by coceng Updated Sep 11, 2003
    Rare coins ?

    Fondest memory: These coins were given to me by the guy at the Tourist Office in the main Train Station. He asked for some Malaysian coins & luckily I had them, all the denominations too !
    In return, he gave me these 2 Commemorative Coins that he said would be rare. I didn't know how truth this was but I accepted them anyway as a gesture. I was happy in having them. They are like my good luck charms I guess.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Backpacking

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  • coceng's Profile Photo

    Money Notes...

    by coceng Written Sep 11, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Money notes before Euros

    Fondest memory: Although I was in Slovenia for just a few days, less than 1 week even. The money notes are the memories that I would always remember Slovenia & particularly Ljubljana for.
    In 2004, all these money notes will have new designs maybe, Euros designs but now at least from you, you still get to see them.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel

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