Church of St. George, Piran

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  • Church of St. George
    by Herwig1961
  • Church of St. George
    by Herwig1961
  • Church of St. George
    by Herwig1961
  • csordila's Profile Photo

    Baroque Cathedral with Venetian Campanile

    by csordila Updated Nov 24, 2008

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    Venetian Campanile
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    Above the compact town centre reigns the St. George Cathedral, which gives the city its special character. It is composed of three distinct constructions laid out in a row. From east to west they are: the church, the belltower and the baptistery.
    The Cathedral was probably built in the 12th Century, but no exact data in regard exists. The handsome seventeenth century bell tower was designed by Giacomo di Nodari, a Capodistria artist. It rises sharply between the rounded apse of the church and the baptistery. On the top is the twirling angel of St. Michael, which locals use to predict the weather, according to which way it points.
    It was blatantly copied from the St. Mark’s campanile in Venice. There is an interesting fact, however, this imitation is older(!!) than the original, which collapsed unexpectedly in 1902, and was rebuilt just 10 years later.
    Enter the tower and climb the wooden stairs to the top for an extraordinary view of the City and the Bay of Trieste.
    Visiting of the museum beside the Campanile makes it possible to get into the church which is nearly always closed, though it has a fine interior with altars and picture canvases from the Venetian school, a wooden sculpture of St. George Killing the Dragon and St Nicholas, the patron of sailors.

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  • tim07's Profile Photo

    Piran

    by tim07 Updated Apr 13, 2008

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    Churh of St. George from Tartini Square

    Situated on a hill above Piran is the Church of St. George. The Campanile is a copy of the one in St Mark's Square in Venice. The tower wasn't open at the time, but the views from the courtyard of Tartini Square & the Adriatic Sea were well worth the climb up the hill.

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Church of St. George

    by Dabs Updated Jun 20, 2007

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    Organ
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    Towering over the north end of the city is the Church of St. George, built around the 12th century but the current appearance dates to 1637. If it's open when you stop by, take a look inside at the magnificent white and gold organ, the frescoes on the ceiling and the statue of St. George slaying the dragon.

    I didn't see the church museum but we would have been too early to visit as we were there before it opened, it should be open from 11 am- 5pm with a small admission fee. My guide book said it was worth a look, filled with church treasures. The belfry, modeled on the Campanile in St. Mark's Square in Venice, was also not open yet, from 11am-5 pm you should be able to climb up for a view over the city for a small admission fee.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Bell Tower

    by Willettsworld Updated Oct 8, 2006

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    The Bell Tower, or Campanile in Italian, is a smaller copy of the one in Venice in St Mark’s Square. It was built in 1608 and features a bell that dates from the 15th century. It’s possible to climb up the tower where the 360 degree views from the top are fantastic and a must do.

    Open: 10am-12pm & 4-8pm. Admission: 150SIT.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Baptistery

    by Willettsworld Written Oct 8, 2006

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    The baptistery is an octagonal shaped building beside St George’s Church and the Bell Tower on top of the hill overlooking the town. It was built in 1650 and features an interior of 17th century furniture and a number of paintings from different periods. It also has a large medieval crucifix that dates from 1370 and a Roman sarcophagus in the centre that dates from the first half of the 2nd century AD. Unfortunately it doesn’t look like its possible to enter inside, or at least when I visited, as it looks like its being renovated.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Cathedral Museum

    by Willettsworld Written Oct 8, 2006
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    There are two parts to this museum. The first part is in a small room near the entrance which houses a collection of chalices, sceptres and a wonderful silver statue of St George slaying the dragon. The next part is underground which, I think, shows the foundations of the original 12th century church and photo’s of the present church before being renovated in august 2002.

    Open: 9am-12pm & 4-8pm. Admission: 240SIT.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Interior

    by Willettsworld Written Oct 8, 2006

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    The only way, I think, of visiting the interior of the cathedral is by visiting the museum through a small door on the cathedrals southern side. I visited the museum and then the lady attendant showed me a door that lead inside the cathedral. The cathedral has a beautiful interior and is very peaceful. The main feature of the interior is the unusual statue of St George slaying the dragon that dates from the 17th century. The wall paintings are the work of the Venetian painting school. The two big paintings, (Mass in Bolsena and St. George Miracle), date from the beginning of the 17th Century and were painted by Angelo de Coster. More photos can be found on one of my travelogues.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    St George’s Cathedral exterior & history

    by Willettsworld Written Oct 8, 2006

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    This cathedral is perched on a small ridge that rises above the northern side of the town. Its origins date back to the 12th century whilst its current size and shape date back to 1344. It acquired its present Baroque appearance in 1637 and soon after this, supporting walls were built around the cathedral and stone arches built along the northern side from 1663 until 1804. There are still renovation works taking place on the surrounding land when I visited.

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  • hundwalder's Profile Photo

    Piran ( Pirano ) sea shore

    by hundwalder Updated Sep 23, 2006

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    Piran of Slovenija

    This photo which was taken from Cape Madonna, shows cerkev sv. Jurija ( church of St. George ) pirched high atop a hill supported by a massive retaining wall, as well as shorter retaining walls. Retaining walls were built throughout the centuries to prevent the ancient city from being washed into the sea by rain triggered mudslides. Sea cliffs are vulnerable land features that do not take well to being excavated and reshaped for human habitation.

    Thousands of wealthy Californians ( in U.S. ) have no understanding of the technology perfected by Slovenes 500 years ago. Their 10 million euro hillside mansions are constantly being destroyed by mudslides, and promptly being replaced free of charge by the sucker American taxpayer ( me ). And then they sit around and boast about how technologically advanced the U.S. is in comparison to the rest of the planet.

    As you can probably tell, the grounds of the church provide excellent panoramic views of the city and of all of the short but scenic Slovenijan coast. Most of the short Slovene coast is steep, rugged, and spectacular to the view, although there are definately better beaches for frolicking in the water.

    Enjoy Piran; there are few places in the world like it.

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  • SWFC_Fan's Profile Photo

    Views from the spire of St George's Church

    by SWFC_Fan Written Dec 30, 2005

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    View from St George's Church, Piran
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    For the very best views of the picturesque town of Piran, you must climb the steep steps to the top of the spire of the Church of St George.

    The view over Tartini Square from the town walls at the foot of the church is good, but the view from the top is even more breathtaking!

    An elderly lady collects a small entrance fee at the front door of the church.

    Once you climb to the top (a steep climb), you'll be rewarded with amazing views over Tartini Square and out over the blue Adriatic Sea.

    Be aware that the bells chime every 15 minutes and if you're up at the top when they do so it is VERY loud!

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  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Church Sveti Jurij (Saint George)

    by himalia11 Updated Oct 3, 2005

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    Campanile and church St George

    The baroque church Sveti Jurij was probably build in the 12th century and was consecrated in 1344. It is situated on a hill from which you have a nice view on the city and the coast. Next to the church is the Campanile which was build 1608 and is one of the town’s landmarks. It’s a smaller copy of the St Marco campanile of Venice. From there is a street up to the city wall which you’ll see from the church, but it was a hot day and we didn’t feel like climbing up anymore! Another path goes along the shore, down to the beach.

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  • hundwalder's Profile Photo

    Cerkev sv. Jurija campanile and baptistry

    by hundwalder Updated May 3, 2005

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    sv. Jurija campanile and baptistry

    Our anglophile friends know it as church of St. George and the belfry. The church, campanile, and baptistry are located on the highest elevation of the Piran peninsula and therefore, are visible from the entire region. In front of the church is a courtyard surrounded by a short wall. The wall is built on the edge of a fascinating sea cliff. The courtyard affords excellent views of Piran, the Adriatic Sea coast, and the Istrian Peninsula of Croatia.

    The Gothic architecture of all but the roof of the campanile suggests that it was built about 700 years ago, but in fact it is only 400 years old. The roof definately says early Baroque. This campanile is said to be a copy of the much older San Marco basilica campanile in Venezia. If you look at the San Marco photo in my Venice page, you will notice major differences in the architecture of the two. I accidentally cropped off most of winged angel atop the roof. Forgive me. At any rate this campanile rises high above anything else in Piran.

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  • novsco61's Profile Photo

    Cerkev sv.Jurija

    by novsco61 Updated Jan 18, 2005

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    Parish church of St. George rises above the town .
    The slope with its church complex was strengthened with flying buttresses, built gradually from the mid-17th to the early 19th centuries. The Baroque hall church began to be built after 1595 in the place of the older Gothic church hallowed in 1344. The church was completed and rehallowed in 1637.

    From 1990, the Church of St. George has been subjected to a thorough restoration and presentation by the Regional Institute for the Conservation of Natural and Cultural Heritage Piran in cooperation with the Restoration Center of the Republic of Slovenia and the Parish Office of St. George in Piran.

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  • DrewV's Profile Photo

    Church of St. George

    by DrewV Updated Oct 2, 2003
    View from the top

    In some of the other pictures, you might have noticed a large campanile rising above the city. That's the bell tower of St. George's Church, from which this shot is taken. You can see the red roofs of the town and the medieval city walls on the horizon. Top notch, really. It's a great view.

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  • Skeptic-jr's Profile Photo

    St George Church

    by Skeptic-jr Written Aug 25, 2003

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    The Church of Saint George located on the hill overlooks the whole Piran. The building takes roots from the Middle Age, but was renewed in Baroque style. In the inside especially interesting are two scupltures of St. George and the organ.

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