Local traditions and culture in Cadiz

  • Nativity Scene (Cádiz, Andalucía, Spain)
    Nativity Scene (Cádiz, Andalucía, Spain)
    by Redang
  • Nativity Scene (Cádiz, Andalucía, Spain)
    Nativity Scene (Cádiz, Andalucía, Spain)
    by Redang
  • Nativity Scene (Cádiz, Andalucía, Spain)
    Nativity Scene (Cádiz, Andalucía, Spain)
    by Redang

Most Viewed Local Customs in Cadiz

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    Locals enjoy the park

    by kaloz Written Nov 24, 2008

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    You may find the local youths enjoying the Parque Genoves. It offers some winding paths. interesting sights, benches to rest, and area to play. At first sight these teens wanted to appear tough, like a gang, but revealed their nature as they hammed it up for the camera.

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    Fishing along the walls

    by kaloz Written Nov 24, 2008

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    Is seems that anywhere man encounters the water, he will drop a line and try to catch a fish. Along the walls the water is shallow and warm and you can see the fish if you gaze over the walls. These fishermen were not actively fishing, they were enjoying the benches in the shade while their lines with bait patiently waited for the fish to get hungry.

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  • Feria, Feria, Feria

    by blint Updated Apr 12, 2008

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    Feria's are held all over Andalucia and Spain. They comprise of two parts: A fair ground for the kids and a village of beer tents for the adults. Though you don't usually drink beer, but Fino which is a type of pale sherry and an acquired taste! You also dress up in Falmenco type gitana dresses and dance Sevillanas which is a traditional dance from Sevilla (seville).

    Horses are also a big part of it in Jerez and there is a parade down the main street of horses like the the photo opposite! Though you can always find horses to some extent in a feria.

    Each town holds their Ferias at different times though it kicks off in Sevilla usually in May though it varies depending on Easter. Next is El Puerto and Jerez within a week of each other. Jean has it's feria in October and Arcos in September. So there are always ferias going on somewhere.

    However in Cádiz city they don't really have a feria because they prefer the Carnaval. The Gaditanos who like the feria usually gate crash the ferias of neighbouring towns!

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  • Gas Butano

    by blint Updated Apr 10, 2008

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    Here in Cadiz it is still the norm to get your gas delivered to you in the orange gas bottles you see in the photo. You phone up and buy a new bottle for 14 euros which is then delivered to your doorstep. You then plug it in to your water boiler and/or gas cooker. It usually lasts me about a month or two.

    This system may seem highly primitive and it can be very inconvenient if it runs out over the weekend or a holiday weekend, but I think it is cheaper and makes you more concious of the gas you use. Before I used to think it was highly unsafe (it is) but now I don't think the mains gas supply in Spain is any safer! You here just as many stories about mains gas leaks as bombona gas leaks.

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  • Getting a Word in Edgeways...

    by blint Written Jan 27, 2008

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    Here in Cadiz the people love to talk, loudly. In fact they think the French and British whisper when they talk, just to show you how loud they can be!

    They don't mind that the table beside them in a bar or restaurant, or the rest of the people in the bus or train can hear every word they're saying.

    Getting a word in edgeways may prove difficult as well as 'turn taking' in conversations in not taken seriously. If two people start to talk at the same time, one will not give in, instead both end up talking at the same time! The rest of the people have to choose who they prefer to listen to.

    When I first came here I would stop talking if someone started to say something at the same time or if some one interrupted me. This way I never got to express myself so these days I do what they do and keep on talking or I politely say that I started talking first and that I'd like to finish! All my friends are aware of my finding this cultural trait difficult to get used to and therefore let me finish!! :)

    If you watch debate programmes on the TV it is impossible as everyone is talking at the same time even if the poor presenter tries to ask someone to wait their turn!!!

    They do not see their form of discourse impolite and are surprised when I say this is not the done thing in Britain! One friend suggests their way of talking is more dynamic!

    Whatever your views on this topic, if you are here you have to swallow your values and talk!

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  • Bullfighting

    by blint Updated Jan 27, 2008

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    Torture is not art nor culture it's a national disgrace (translation from the poster).

    Cadiz does NOT have a Bull Ring but on the 17th and 18th June a couple of years ago they made a makeshift one and hosted bullfights.

    This did not go down well with many of the locals who came out to protest against bullfighting and that Cadiz should play host to one after 39 years. Bull fighting isn't popular here.

    If you like bullfighting or want to watch a fight then Cadiz Capital is not the place for you!

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  • Feeling gay!?!

    by blint Updated Jan 27, 2008

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    Cádiz is a gay friendly city, including bars in the centre heralding the rainbow flag in their windows.

    If you are looking for a gay atmosphere then try SEBLON in El Populo which is near the Cathedral. PONIENTE on Beato Diego de Cádiz, 18, or LA LUNA on Dr. Zurita esq. Gral. Duque.

    Here in Spain it is now legal for gay couples to get married and even adopt! So why not come here and get married on the beach! :)

    Here you will have no trouble expressing affection for you partner in the streets or bars. It is widely accepted here! :)

    Another great gay friendly place to go in the province of Cadiz is Los Caños de Meca

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  • Dogs 2

    by blint Written Jan 27, 2008

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    By law your dog should have a micro chip to stop people abandoning their pets which is a common thing here. In the villages around Cadiz there are many abandoned dogs in the streets which is a problem for society. If they go on holiday or get bored of them they prefer to turf them out on the streets rather than pay the 6€ to leave them at the dog pound.

    The dog pound in Puerto Real isn't exactly a nice place. Conditions are bad and dogs are killed if they are not found a home within a short time. This caused problems for a Italian couple who left their dogs in the 'pet residence' of the dogs pound only to find that when they came to collect them they had been killed due to a 'mix up'. So if you are coming here with dogs DON'T use the residence at the dog pound in Puerto Real!!!! There aren't many good 'pet hotels' or 'residences' in the area, but I hear there is an OK one in El Puerto de Santa Maria.

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  • Dogs

    by blint Written Jan 27, 2008

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    Here in Cadiz many people have dogs although it seems just as many, if not more people are scared of them. I don't mean scared of big dogs either, I mean all dogs!

    It is defiantly a cultural thing as many people here are taught that dogs are dirty. They would be disgusted if they saw you kissing a dog in public. Dog kissing isn't done here, not even on the top of their heads! If they saw you letting a dog lick your face they would certainly screw their faces up!

    Saying this dog owners seem to think it is perfectly all right to leave dog dirt on the streets and on the beach, although this SLOWLY changing. Dog dirt bins are starting to pop up around town in the parks and such like.

    You will see dogs on the beach in the winter despite there being a no dogs sign on every entrance. They were put up a few years ago as many people take their dogs to the beach without picking up the brown presents they leave! This annoys me as a dog owner as if everyone picked up the dog dirt maybe we could take them to the beach as there aren't many other places to take them here to let them run around. The other thing that annoys me is that owners let their dogs off the leads without controlling them so they come and annoy your dogs or other people!

    In the summer the police patrol the beaches making sure you don't take your dogs among other things.

    If it a common sight to see 'dangerous dogs' such as pitbulls without muzzles and with their balls intact! I see this as another problem as these people tend to have no idea about dog training! This is more common in El Puerto de Santa Maria than Cadiz city, but you still see them here too.

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  • SMOKING!

    by blint Updated Jan 19, 2008

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    Here in Cadiz the recent changes in the law are taking their time to come into effect. Although in most fully fledged restaurants it is now prohibited to smoke (or there is a small smoking section), you can still smoke in most bars and cafes. In many places they still haven't enforced the smoking / non smoking sections.

    If you are a non smoker this is perhaps bad news as some places can get smoky; if you are a smoker, on the other hand, this must be good news for you!

    You can buy cigarettes in the Estancos which have a brown and yellow sign saying Tabacs. Here the main brand is Fortuna which comes in a red and white packet. You can't buy packs of 10, only 20 and they cost 2.50€. Malborough and such like are slightly more expensive at around 2.70€. Although rolling tobacco isn't very popular here you can still buy it in the Estanco and it is a lot cheaper than buying ready rolled packs.

    When buying it from a bar please note that you must ask the bar staff to 'activate' the machine as there is now an 'age control' mechanism to keep an eye on who is buying tobacco.

    If you can't speak Spanish if you wave in the general direction of the machine they will understand you. Cigarettes is 'Cigarros' in Spanish or you can also mumble something about 'la maquina' (makina) which means the machine.

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  • El Carranza

    by blint Updated Jan 16, 2008

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    Every year in August as a spin off to the end of the football Trofeo de El Carranza ,where Cadiz CF play teams such as Real Madrid, there are BBQ's on the beach.

    In years gone by groups of friends would gather on the beach and make their own BBQ's and drink with their friends all night long (until the sun comes up). As of 2007 things may change a little due to the new anti drinking laws which prohibit botellon (drinking on the streets) and worries over the environmental problems the BBQ's may create. Although a special deal has been made to have the BBQ this year posters have been put up advising people not to bring coal (carbon) which of course is an essential part of a BBQ.

    It is true that after the BBQ's the beach is littered with rubbish and coal which then leads to an incredible clean up operation. Coal, however is very difficult to clean up hence why this warning has been posted.

    So, although it isn't prohibited to have BBQ's in years to come they will try and encourage people to bring the food already made.

    It would be a shame to stop this well known festival unique to Cadiz.

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  • Shops: Siestas y Fiestas

    by blint Updated Jan 11, 2008

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    Shops usually open fom about 10am in the morning and close at 2pm (in Spain the morning (mañana) is considered to be up to 2pm not 12pm). They then open again in the afternoon at about 5:30-6 until 9-9:30.In Spain there is no evening time they call it afternoon (tarde) right up to nightime (noche).

    Many shops may close Saturday afternoons and all day Sunday. Especially in smaller towns or villages.

    Watch out for the many holidays and
    Puentes (extended holidays) when shops can be closed 3 or 4 days in a row!!!!!!

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  • Gaditanos and Gaditanas

    by blint Updated Dec 7, 2007

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    Gaditano/a is the name to describe someone from Cadiz. You will hear this word mentioned a lot as they are very proud of it and it's meaning. You can find the typical Gaditano/a all over town but especially in La Viña in the heart of the old town.

    So what is a typical Gaditano/like:

    Friendly,

    Loud,

    Gossiping,

    Sociable,

    Cheerful,

    Lazy,

    House Proud,

    Never punctual,

    Unreliable,

    Think that Cadiz is the best place on Earth,

    Don't travel far,

    Helpful,

    Thick accents,

    Not animal lovers,

    Traditional,

    Men from 5-70 dress alike,

    Macho ideas but more effeminate body movements (men),

    Jealous,

    Passionate (in public too),

    Expressive,

    Live at home until 32,

    Family orientated,

    Unaggressive but verbal,

    Hairy,

    Gelled hair,

    I'm sorry if I offend any Gaditano/a reading this but it is purely a generalisation and I'm sure you recognise many of the traits I mentioned.

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  • Puchero

    by blint Written Dec 3, 2007

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    Puchero is a very typical dish from Cadiz, In other parts of Spain a similar dish called 'Cocido' can be found which is basically the same as puchero. It is of course that the people of Cadiz like to call things by their own name, but anyway, if you are here in Cádiz, give Puchero a go if you can. Something to keep in mind is that Puchero is a typical dish eaten at home and a fancy restaurant is not likely to have it. This is in fact true of most typical foods from Cadiz. Therefore it is worth trying a less fancy place which may give you the true taste of Cadiz, or get yourself invited to someone's house!!!!!

    Puchero is made from chick peas, chicken, ham, potatoes, carrots, leeks and things all stewed together. It is a kind of soup/stew.

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    Mercado Andalusí

    by Redang Written Sep 16, 2007

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    This market takes place every August for a few days, mostly in the evening/night. El Barrio del Pópolo hosts this event where you can enjoy markets, food and some shows as well as concerts, everything related to the essence of Al-Andalus..

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Cadiz Local Customs

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