Córdoba Favorites

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    General things

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Nov 23, 2014

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    Favorite thing: Cordoba is located in headwaters of Guadalquivir. The city is included in the List of the World cultural heritage. The historical part of the city is on the left northern bank of the river. The center of the historical part of the city is the well-known Mosque - one of the greatest mosques of the world. Jewish area Juderia is kept to the West from the Mosque. More close to the river there is palace Alcazar.

    You can watch my 2 min 44 sec Video Cordoba part 1 out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

    Cordoba - Monument
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    • Architecture

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  • Maymuna's Profile Photo

    Religion and Philosophy

    by Maymuna Written Apr 6, 2013

    Favorite thing: Córdoba is a city where you can find some of the history of the three most popular religions in European history - Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
    It was also the birthplace of several important philosophers - Seneca, Ibn Rushd (Averroes), and Maimonides.

    Rabi'a quote in Casa Andalus�� Seneca Ibn Rushd Maimonides
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    • Museum Visits

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  • GentleSpirit's Profile Photo

    Since my last visit

    by GentleSpirit Updated Mar 22, 2013

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    Favorite thing: When I visited Cordoba in 2004 tourism seemed in some ways an afterthought. To me that seemed terribly unfortunate because the city has a number of very real charms and a fascinating history.

    The local tourist board has apparently made great progress. Cordoba has an excellent tourist website along with information points at the RENFE station, the Alcazar and the old town.
    More tours and information seems to be available with an eye toward making Cordoba more than a day trip destination. There are now guided tours of the downtown (though they seem expensive) and a more organized effort. Bien hecho!

    You can see the website at http://english.turismodecordoba.org/index2.cfm

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  • GentleSpirit's Profile Photo

    Staying in Cordoba

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jan 7, 2013

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    Favorite thing: A lot of visitors usually only give Cordoba a day or two at the most. The number of tourists that came on daytrips in on large buses is staggering. At night you immediately notice a much less crowded atmosphere.

    If you stay in Cordoba, particularly when the flowers are in bloom, give it at least two days. One day is just not much time unless you just want to come in and see the mezquita and get out of town.

    Cordoba has a lot of good restaurants and a nice unhurried atmosphere. There are also special events sponsored by the city. While I was there the city put on a flamenco performance at the Alcazar, which was outstanding. Make sure to look for such events on the tourism website and information centers.

    At the time of my visit a lot of places around town were being excavated and prettied up. Back then, the tourist office offered no real organized excursions in the city, now there are several. Clearly they have made some significant steps forward.

    Medina Azhara, which is outside of town, might be a reason to stay extra time. (I didn't go, so I can't say for sure)

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    • Photography

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  • GentleSpirit's Profile Photo

    Fiesta de San Rafael

    by GentleSpirit Updated Sep 25, 2012

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    Fondest memory: Without knowing it beforehand, the second day of my stay in Cordoba (Oct. 24) was the festival of the patron saint of the city, San Rafael. Many businesses are closed and there are limited city services. The communist unions had called a transport strike for that day (though I'm not sure how successful it was) I had met a policeman the previous day who seemed intrigued that an American could speak Spanish so well.

    Spaniards go out to the country with their families on this day and I was invited to join the policeman's family. You go out into the countryside just outside of the city and basically make a picnic. There were no special rituals, it was more of a nice relaxing day out in the country. They take a little barbeque sort of thing to cook and all the men compete, trying to show off their skills as chefs. They end up making a very nice dish called perol, which is mainly rice and some meat stew.

    That evening there was an outstanding flamenco show at the Alcazar put on by one of the flamenco schools in the city. I was later told by flamenco fans that what i saw that night was probably one of the most genuine performances. I have to say that the quality of the performance was exceptional. The singer sang with such emotion (and without a microphone his voice was clear and strong). I was told by other Spaniards I met that what i got to see that night was very very good quality and genuine.

    The Archangel Rafael, patron saint of the city An offering to the patron Saint
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  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    Strolling around the old city center

    by Gypsystravels Updated Apr 13, 2012

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    Favorite thing: The old city center of Cordoba is lovely and makes it a perfect city to wander around. The proximity of the major sites affords you a wonderful and leisurely day exploring.

    Although we had a map of the major sites, we decided to take our time wandering the many small streets and alleys, stopping to take pictures of anything that was of interest to us.

    I love photographing the many different architectural styles of the many cities I explore and Cordoba afforded me so many wonderful opportunities.

    Related to:
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    • Museum Visits
    • Photography

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Churches and Temples

    by Martin_S. Updated Sep 14, 2008

    Favorite thing: It is amazing the number and diversity of the religious buildings you will see in many of the major towns and cities of Spain. Here in Cordoba we found many small churches and even the remains of a Roman temple. Sadly the Roman temple is fenced in and closed to visitors. The church of Santa Maria is just across the street from the Manolette statue. I wonder if the different types of architecture show different offshoots of Christiananity or just the taste of the individual architect who designed them during whatever period the church was built.

    Church of Santa Maria, Cordova, Spain Church of San Andreas, Cordova, Spain Church entrance, Cordova, Spain Roman Temple, Cordova, Spain
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    • Archeology
    • Architecture

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Manolete

    by Martin_S. Updated Sep 2, 2008

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    Favorite thing: I think that most of us have never seen a bullfight in our lives. As for me I have only been to one country (Spain) that actually does bullfights...but the name Manolete was familiar even to me as a famous bullfighter that died in the ring even before I was born. A piece of Spanish history that stays in your mind. The following web site has a pretty good piece about him.
    http://www.spanish-fiestas.com/bullfighting/manolete.htm

    Manolete, Bullfighter, Cordoba, Spain
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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Puerta del Puente (Bridge Gate)

    by Martin_S. Written Aug 20, 2008

    Favorite thing: Puerta del Puente (Bridge Gate) is found at the end of the bridge (now isn't that a surprise) crossing the Guadalquivir River, it and the bridge itself were supposedly built by the Romans, Julius Caesar if I remember correctly. It later had changes and repairs made to it by the Moslem rulers.

    Puerta del Puente (Bridge Gate), Cordoba, Spain
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    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Zoco Municipal (City Crafts Market)

    by Martin_S. Written Aug 20, 2008

    Favorite thing: On the same street as the Synagogue and across from it is the Zoco Municipal, a project supported by the city where they have gathered together craftsmen who both work and sell at this spot. There is also a general store where they sell many products, not just from one craftsman. A great place to pick up souveniers or presents at fairly reasonable prices.

    Zoco Municipal (Crafts Market), Cordoba, Spain Zoco Municipal (Crafts Market), Cordoba, Spain Zoco Municipal (Crafts Market), Cordoba, Spain
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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Plaza las Tendillas

    by Martin_S. Written Aug 12, 2008

    Favorite thing: Plaza las Tendillas is a large open square in the old city of Cordova, not too far from the hostel where we stayed. We found the statue of Gonzalo de Cordova there and YES, I did have to look up the name to learn who this was. I got the following from the The Columbia Encyclopedia.....
    Gonzalo Fernández de Córdoba , 1453-1515, Spanish general, called the Great Captain. He fought in the civil wars preceding and following the accession of Isabella I and in the conquest of Granada. He commanded the army aiding Naples against Charles VIII of France. After expeditions against the rebellious Moriscos of Granada and the Turks, he returned to Italy as an ally of Louis XII of France, who had joined with Ferdinand II of Aragón to partition Naples. When Naples had been conquered, he expelled (1502-4) the French and served as governor until 1507. He greatly improved the Spanish infantry by specializing the use of weapons.

    Gonzalo de Cordova, Cordova, Spain Plaza las Tendillas, Cordova, Spain Plaza las Tendillas, Cordova, Spain
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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Calleja de las Flores (Street of Flowers)

    by Martin_S. Written Aug 12, 2008

    Favorite thing: Probably the most well known street in the old city of Cordova, the Calleja de las Flores (Street of Flowers), leads off the main throughofare into a cul-de-sac of only a few hundred meters long. There is a sign that you can see in the first photo, but you need to be on the lookout for this as it is NOT obvious, nor is it lit at night. The street is a very quiet residential street, very narrow and close, but with many plants hanging in their pots from various places. We did see this in many other places as well, some with even more plants.

    Calleja de las Flores, Cordova, Spain Calleja de las Flores, Cordova, Spain Calleja de las Flores, Cordova, Spain Calleja de las Flores, Cordova, Spain Calleja de las Flores, Cordova, Spain
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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    THE CATHEDRAL TREASURY

    by LoriPori Written Mar 3, 2008

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    Favorite thing: The outstanding Corpus Christi monstrance by Enrique de Arfe and located in the CATHEDRAL TREASURY section of the Mosque / Cathedral, is still used in modern-day processions, giving testimony to the devotion of the people of Cordoba towards the Eucharist. This is just one of the many outstanding items in the treasury. There was just so much priceless gold pieces encased in glass. It was unbelievable.

    Related to:
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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    CALLE DE TORRIJOS

    by LoriPori Written Feb 26, 2008

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    Favorite thing: The street running alongside the Mezquita is CALLE DE TORRIJOS. From this cobblestoned street you will see the walls of the compound with trenches running along side it for drainage. The picture shown here is one picturesque wall featuring a huge door in Mujedar style with the Arabic arches. The detail on the wall is absolutely fascinating to me.

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    LA MEZQUITA - CHAPELS & STATUARY

    by LoriPori Written Feb 22, 2008

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    Favorite thing: Inside the magnificent Mezquita, Cathedral section, you will find many different Chapels, each unique in their own right and many statues.
    The Capilla Real (Royal Chapel) stands out for its Mudejar plasterworks and holds the remains of King Ferdinand and Alfonso XI.
    One of the more impressive chapels is the "Capilla de San Anton" pictured here. You can't help notice the rich gold tones of the chapel.
    Also throughout the Mezquita, Cathedral section, are dozens of statues dedicated to various saints

    Capilla de San Anton

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