Alcazar de los Reyes Cristianos, Córdoba

4.5 out of 5 stars 56 Reviews

Caballerizas Reales, s/n +34 957 42 01 51

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  • Alcazar de los Reyes Cristianos
    by Gypsystravels
  • Alcazar de los Reyes Cristianos
    by Gypsystravels
  • Alcazar de los Reyes Cristianos
    by Gypsystravels
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    Gardens of the Alcazar

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jun 24, 2013

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    The Gardens of the Alcazar are a relaxing place to escape the heat. I went in October, so unfortunately not much was in bloom anymore. There are lots of manicured gardens, fountains, orange trees.

    A lot of locals come here, this is a particularly popular place to take wedding pictures. That will give you a chance to see the Spaniards all dressed up in their finery. Quite elegant

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    Alcazar- Columbus meets the Reyes Catolicos

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jun 24, 2013

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    As early as 1486, Christopher Columbus approached the Reyes Catolicos, Ferdinand and Isabella, seeking sponsorship for his proposed western route to the Indies. They were hesitant. But to hedge their bets, they provided him with an allowance. The Crown ordered that all places under their domain must furnish Columbus with a place to stay and food at no cost. So, he was a representative of the Crown, or at least they were trying to prevent him from going and offering his services elsewhere, just in case.

    Realistically, Columbus had come at a pretty tough time. First, Catholic Spain was gradually completing the Reconquista (re-conquering), either by treaty or by force replacing the established Moorish governments. Beyond that was the challenge of unifying Spain into a unitary state, where previously it had been a collection of autonomous areas under different rule.

    In 1492, after the conquest of Granada, the Moors had finally been vanquished. Columbus was summoned to the Alcazar in Cordoba, where the Reyes Catolicos lived at the time. Poor Columbus, it sounds like they drove him nuts with their indecisiveness about the venture. Finally, his terms were accepted and the rest, as they say, is history....

    Columbus meets Ferdinand and Isabella
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    Beautiful Garden

    by Maymuna Written Apr 6, 2013

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    These are especially beautiful for the gardens. Absolutely stunning, and I love the little details that they have have created with the plants.
    From the towers you get a nice view of the city, and inside the building you can see mosaics and a bust of Seneca's father.

    Orange trees
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    Tower of the Inquisition

    by GentleSpirit Updated Mar 3, 2013

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    The Alcazar of Cordoba has served many functions in its time. Though it served as a royal residence for about 8 years, it has also served as the headquarters of the Holy Office of the Inquisition.

    Cordoba was captured from the Moors in 1236. In 1482 Pope Sixtus IV granted permission to the kings of Spain to conduct an Inquisition, presumably to root out heresy and false conversions. The Inquisitors and the institutions created answered only to the Spanish monarch, unlike the Medieval Inquisition, the Pope had no real authority in this process. Full control of the office of the Inquisition, both political and economic, was held by the Spanish crown. Presumably then, there would be no opportunity for appeal to Rome. Between 1480 and 1834, the Inquisition was an instrument of political and religious absolutism. Though its purpose may have been to ensure religious orthodoxy, one of its political side effects was to stamp out free expression and dissent.

    In terms of Cordoba, the most significant events relating to the Inquisition happened under Diego Rodriguez Lucero, who was named Inquisitor General of Cordoba in 1499. At the auto da fe on December 22,1504 Lucero condemned 107 persons to be burned at the stake in the Plaza de la Corredera for heresy. Appeals were made to the Holy Office and to the King, none of which were answered. On November 9, 1506 the people of Cordoba stormed the prison, today's Alcazar, and liberated 400 prisoners. (source-http://cordobapedia.wikanda.es/wiki/Diego_Rodr%ADguez_de_Lucero)

    Though this act in effect clearly challenged the unlimited power of the Inquisition (and the Crown by extension) neither of these institutions went away. The net effect may have been to tone down the violence of it all. The punishments and institutions of the Inquisition remained until they became more or less irrelevant after 1700.

    Torre de la Inquisicion
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    Hall of Mosaics

    by GentleSpirit Written Nov 11, 2012

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    Really one of the highlights of the visit to the Alcazar has to be the impressive Hall of Mosaics.
    Built in the 18th century, directly above the Arab Baths in the complex. It served as Chapel of the Inquisition and later became the chapel for the Jail, as the functions of the Alcazar changed.

    The Hall is decorated with Roman mosaics of very high quality. These were unearthed beneath the present Plaza de la Corredera and brought to the Alcazar. It should be noted that the place where these mosaics were found is thought to have been the roman amphitheater, but that is now disputed by historians.

    The Ocean
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    Jardines del Alcazar

    by Aitana Written Jun 6, 2010

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    Alcazar de los Reyes Cristianos is a must when you visit Córdoba.

    Once in the Alcazar, don't miss the magnificient gardens. They ocupy 55,000 m2. Among ponds and fountains there are cypress, palm, orange and lemon trees.

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    Alcazar de los Reyes Cristianos

    by Roadquill Updated Nov 19, 2009

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    Very cool fort with sculptures, pools, old Roman ruins. As you enter the Alcazar the are several pools that fall away from the fortress. It provides an almost park like setting. As you enter the fortress there are numerous stone ramparts and walkways. Inside are a number of sculptures, 2000 year old Roman mosaics and carved stone sarcofagi.

    Pools at the Alcazar
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    Paseo de los Reyes. Main Sculptural Monument.

    by euzkadi Updated May 21, 2009

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    The Paseo de los Reyes is perfectly flanked by cypress trees and three ponds. In the central Axis is located the interesting monument of King Ferdinand and Isabella giving audience to Christopher Columbes before the first voyage to America.

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    Ponds.

    by euzkadi Written May 21, 2009

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    As i said before in another tip, the gardens are really beautiful, there are several long ponds surrounded with flowers and fountains. The place is full of peace, and very refreshing, a perfect place to relax and protect oneself from the hot sun of Cordoba.

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    Paseo de los Reyes.

    by euzkadi Written May 21, 2009

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    But the most beautiful sight of the Alcazar are the gardens. Very well preserved, full of cypress trees and flowers. The Paseo de los Reyes is the main road of the gardens, decorated with Statues of Kings who lived or are somehow connected with the history of the Fortress.

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    Torre de los Leones.

    by euzkadi Updated May 20, 2009

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    This tower is the main entrance to the building, and is the oldest tower of the fortress. Originally there were four towers surrounding the main square building, but in the last century the tower of La Paloma was demolished. After the entrance if you turn left you will visit the Salon de los Mosaicos (Mosaics Salon) with some superb Roman Mosaics founded during the constuction of La Plaza de la Corredera.

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    Catholic Monarchs home.

    by euzkadi Updated May 20, 2009

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    This Fortress was home to the Catholic Monarchs Ferdinand and Isabella, who lived here for eight years. The building was originally the residence of the Cordovan Calipht, later became the home of the Royal Inquisition and ended as a prision. The fortress was declared World Heritage Site by the Unesco in 1994. I specially liked the beautiful gardens very well designed.

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    Beautiful Desert Garden

    by setikeyvan Updated Jul 8, 2008

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    This is a wonderful treat to the ears and to the eyes. The Arab culture has always been fond of fountains and they did a great job integrating this soothing aesthetic to the gardens of Alcazar. Strolling around this garden is just lovely, the sound of water trickling all around you and the beautiful array of flowers is quite a treat for all the senses. This is a must visit when touring Cordoba City. If you're going there in the summer make sure you bring a hat and plenty of water. It's very hot there and there are only a few shaded spots.

    Alcazar de los Reyes Cristianos Alcazar de los Reyes Cristianos Alcazar de los Reyes Cristianos Alcazar de los Reyes Cristianos
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    Hard & Soft

    by akikonomu Written Mar 30, 2008

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    Whilst the fortified walls of the Alcazar and statue of an armoured king greeting you at the entrance gives an impression of a "hard", war-like fortress, your impression of the place gradually changes as you move into its interior. Mosaic filled rooms, airy patios and roses-filled gardens don't seem to gel with the initial experience.

    Considering that Cordoba was used as a base by the Spanish king and queen to retake Andalucia from the Moors, it is actually not strange for the fortress cum palace to retain these aspects.

    Garden Tower Mosaic
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    EL ALCAZAR DE LOS REYES CRISTIANOS

    by LoriPori Updated Feb 21, 2008

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    While EL ALCAZAR DE LOS REYES CRISTIANOS or Alcazar of the Christian Monarchs, displays Islamic features, it was built by the Christians in 1328 under King Alfonso XI. The Moors expanded the Alcazar to a very large compound with baths and fountains. Watermills on the nearby Guadalquivir River, powered water lifting to irrigate the extensive gardens. The complex has several towers, including the Lions' Tower.
    Queen Isabella and her husband Ferdinand used the Alcazar as headquarters for their campaign against the Nasrid Dynasty of Granada, the last remaining Moorish Kingdom of Spain.
    I enjoyed visiting the Alcazar but found it boring compared to other Alcazars I have visited in Spain.
    Entry fee is four Euros for adults and two Euros for Students with ID.

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