Fun things to do in Córdoba

  • Plaza de Corredera
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Córdoba

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    Cordoba , Spain

    by Danalia Updated Jan 10, 2011

    I've only visited Cordoba for one single day, while I was on my way to Madrid.
    Since I completely bribed about anything that got to do with Spain - then Toledo is not out of the ordinary in that issue....

    Cordoba, Spain Cordoba, Spain Cordoba, Spain Cordoba, Spain Cordoba, Spain

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    Plaza de la Corredera

    by barryg23 Updated Nov 15, 2009

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    Cordoba has many beautiful plazas. One of the largest and most impressive is Plaza de la Corredera, located about 10 minutes walk north of the Mezquita.

    It's a rectangular shaped plaza, which contains columns and columns of 17th century arcades. Overlooking the square are medieval houses, many with balconies. In medieval times, the plaza was used for bullfighting, with the balconies providing an excellent view of the fights.

    Later, the square hosted horse races, while it was also the location for burning heretics in the Inquisition. Nowadays there is a small market on one side of the square, as well as a couple of outdoor cafes with terraces.

    Plaza de la Corredera Plaza de la Corredera

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    Roman Temple

    by barryg23 Updated Nov 8, 2009

    Cordoba is best known for the Mezquita and its buildings from when the Moors ruled the city, but before the Muslim's took control, Cordoba was a Roman city - indeed, it was under the Romans that the city first came to prominence.

    The famous Roman philosopher, Seneca, was born in the city, and the city grew to become the capital of Baetica province, roughly equivalent to modern day Andalucia. However, there isn't too much evidence of Roman Cordoba around today. Perhaps the most extensive ruins are at the Roman Temple, close to Plaza Corredera, in the centre of the city.

    The ruins stand incongruously amidst modern buildings in a busy city centre square. They look like they are still been excavated and there is nothing to visit here yet - for now they can only be admired from a distance.

    Cordoba's Roman Temple Cordoba's Roman Temple

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    Evening walking tours of Cordoba

    by barryg23 Updated Nov 4, 2009

    On our first evening in Cordoba, we spotted an advert for night walking tours of the City, organised by the tourist office. This sounded like an interesting way to get to know the city and gave us a much needed alternative to an evening wine and tapas.

    The tours cost 15 Euro per person and leave from outside the tourist office at Plaza Tendillas at 8.30 most evenings. Tours must be pre-booked at one of the tourist office kiosks around the city.

    Tours are available in French, English and Spanish though if groups are small they can be mixed. There were 6 people in our group - 4 English speakers and 2 Spanish speakers - so our guide talked in both Spanish and English.

    The tour lasted two hours and covered much of the old town. What was surprising was how quiet it was everywhere and how few people were about, even near the Mezquita. Our guide was informative though he didn't really seem too interested or make the history come alive the way some tour guides might.

    After 1.5 hours of walking we ended the tour with a free tapas and wine in Bodegas Mezquita, a popular tapas bar near the Mezquita.

    San Francisco Church Plaza Abades Mezquita from Calleja de Flores Mezquita by night Seneca

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    Jewish home

    by NedHopkins Updated Oct 26, 2009

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    One can almost feel the pain and sorrow a Jewish family must have felt, being expelled from Cordoba (or from Spain) and taking leave of this lovely 12th century home.

    Only the ground floor is open to visitors. There is a second and possibily a third floor.

    Entrance is €2,50 (US$3.75).

    Atrium Living room (?) Patio Study (?) Bath (?)
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    Casa Sefarad/Casa de la Memoria

    by unaS Updated Oct 10, 2009

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    Centered on the discovery of a 14th Century room that may have been a mikva (ritual bath) associated with the synagogue discovered near-by.

    The Casa Sefarad is devoted to the Sephardi history of Cordoba incorporating the Jewish/Spanish/Islamic culture of the area.

    I found the Women from Al-Andalus room fascinating. I had previously had no idea that women had taken such a prominent part in the intellectual life of that period - in which Christian, Jewish, and Islamic cultures shared ideas, philosophies and art. The women poets were exceptional.

    The Jewish Quarter of Cordoba room was closed for renovations. A disappointment since that was the major reason I had made the trek here! The Celebrations and Holidays room is a bit mundane, it could use some creativity applied to it.

    Entry 4€ (wth discount 3€)

    14th C room thought to be a %i mikvah %i Stairs that may have led to the bathing pool. Window of 14th C room.
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    Roman Temple.

    by euzkadi Written May 19, 2009

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    Cordoba was one of the most important Roman cities in Spain, but few remains of the Roman splendour can be found in the city. This temple located near the Plaza de las Tendillas was part of the Imperial Forum. The temple was dedicated to Augustus, Ceasar´s successor. It´amazing to find such variety of cultures in a city (Roman, Mudejar, Medieval), that is one of the things why i found Cordoba specially interesting.

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    Jardines del Campo de la Merced

    by Martin_S. Updated Sep 2, 2008

    The Jardines del Campo de la Merced or simply the Merced Gardens are not to be confused with the Botanical Gardens. The Merced Gardens are just across the street from the Palacio y Jardines de la Merced and are a beautiful place to take a break from your walking trip in Cordoba.

    Jardines del Campo de la Merced, Cordoba, Spain Jardines del Campo de la Merced, Cordoba, Spain Jardines del Campo de la Merced, Cordoba, Spain
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    Palacio y Jardines de le Merced

    by Martin_S. Updated Sep 2, 2008

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    In the old city of Cordoba you will find the Palacio y Jardines de le Merced and the gardens across the street. A beautiful building this convent was where Christopher Colombus stayed. When we were there a protest with live-ins was going on, but nobody spoke English so if you have any idea what the protest was shown on the last photo, please tell us.

    Palacio y Jardines de le Merced, Cordova, Spain Palacio y Jardines de le Merced, Cordova, Spain Palacio y Jardines de le Merced, Cordova, Spain
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    Plaza of Maimonides

    by Roadquill Written Aug 5, 2008

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    Next to the synagoge is a small understated plaza where there is a statue of the reknown Jewish philosopher, teacher, doctor, Maimonides. A young man with a guitar extolled the virtues Maimonides. Recognized by Thomas Aquinas, the sense of harmony within the Jewish, Christian and Muslim religions represented was almost palpable. The right foot of the statue was shiny, as those that rub it are to get good fortune.

    Statue of Maimonides
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    Museo Arqueologico

    by Roadquill Written Aug 4, 2008

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    The museum of archeology is an understated museum of mostly Roman artifacts found in the surrounding area. Many statues, tiled floors, pottery. It certainly gives a sense of the importance of Cordoba 2,000 years ago. Some of the statues were fantastic and the detailed tile floors were exquisite. The only downside was that they did not allow photographs inside.

    Archeology Museum
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    Mizquita Cathedral, the interior

    by Martin_S. Updated Jun 30, 2008

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    The Mizquita Cathedral is built like a Spanish home with the relatively blank exterior walls and then you pass through a door or portal into the interior courtyard which has rooms all around it. Here you can see the centeral courtyard with its trees, be careful when we were there it was under repair and the footing was quite tricky at times. From the courtyard you can access the main chamber where you will see the beautiful arched pillars, the bright lively colors seem to make it alive and animated.

    Mequita Cathedral courtyard, Cordoba, Spain Mequita Cathedral window, Cordoba, Spain Mequita Cathedral interior, Cordoba, Spain
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    Mezquita Cathedral, outside

    by Martin_S. Written Jun 30, 2008

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    Mezquita Cathedral or the "Great Mosque", no matter how it is called, the interior is beautiful. You can see from these photos that the exterior in many places is just a large WALL, although even here you can see many decorative details, especially around windows and doorways. It began its life as a Moslem Mosque and was later changed by the Chrisitans to a Cathedral. Today it is a tourist attraction. We walked around the walls outside and visited the courtyard and even peeked into the interior, but we were on our way to the Alhambra in Grenada, so did not pay the high price of a ticket to the interior.

    Mezquita Cathedral, Cordoba, Spain Mezquita Cathedral, Cordoba, Spain Mezquita Cathedral, Cordoba, Spain Mezquita Cathedral, Cordoba, Spain Mezquita Cathedral, Cordoba, Spain
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    Calleja de las Flores

    by gmg61 Written Jun 27, 2008

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    It's a narrow alley that starts from the middle of Calle Velazquez Bosco, with small arches that connect the two sides.
    Flower pots hangs from the outside walls of the houses. All the walls are white, shing in the sun, the windows are pale blue and the flowers are mainly red.
    A very nice view, pure arabic architecture, you could think you're walking through the streets of Oran or Tunis.
    At the other bottom there is a tiny square, with an orange tree and some nice portals.

    Calleja de la flores from the small square Calleja de las flores and the former minaret Calleja de las flores The fascinating little square

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    Museo Arqueologico

    by karenincalifornia Updated Aug 10, 2007

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    We had seen La Mezquita, the Alcazar, eaten lunch, walked around the Juderia, saw some Roman ruins, visited La Mezquita again, and now we were just killing time until the restaurants opened for dinner at 8:00 pm. Cordoba gets very hot in the summer, and on this particular day temps were soaring to 104 degrees F. A museum that needed air conditioning to protect all of its valuable works of art seemed like the perfect Thing to Do activity. So, we trotted off to the Archeological Museum.

    It was a good idea, but we completely misjudged the temperature thing. Apparently, Cordoban antiquities are very hearty and can survive blazing hot temps. The museum is NOT air conditioned as everything is pretty much open. The museum is a two story building with an open courtyard, and its exhibits are on both stories.

    Looking back now, as I sit in my climate controlled office, I have to say that the museum had a very impressive exhibit. There were Roman mosaics (although not as well preserved as those in the Alcazar), old pots and urns, beautiful old statues and scuptures dating back many centuries. If this museum was in the US, it would be a very big deal. Definitely worth the visit. Just don't expect air conditioning.

    Museo Arqueologico, Cordoba
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