Roman Bridge, Córdoba

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  • Roman Bridge
    by GentleSpirit
  • Roman Bridge
    by GentleSpirit
  • Shrine to San Rafael on the Roman Bridge
    Shrine to San Rafael on the Roman Bridge
    by GentleSpirit
  • Beach_dog's Profile Photo

    The City and the Roman bridge.

    by Beach_dog Updated May 9, 2004

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    The city of Cordoba and the Roman bridge.

    My first view of the city, seeing it on the north bank of the Guadalquivir river, behind it the foothills of the Sierra de Hornachuelos, as I approached from the south bank. To the south of the city lie the rolling plains used for growing wheat and olives.

    Its history really started with the Romans, who 2000 years ago built their capital here at the highest navigatable point of the Guadalquivir for shipping. From here they exported Olive Oil and Grain back to Rome. They also built the Puente Romano a large bridge crossing the river which still survives and is in use today. Although heavily renovated, the bases of the piers are still of Roman construction. Many other roman remains can be seen around the city, some of which I will talk about later.

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    The Puente Romano of Cordoba

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jun 24, 2013

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    El puente romano de Cordoba
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    One of the most lasting tributes to Roman engineering prowess and quality construction is the bridge over the Guadalquivir, a river that today doesn't look as formidable as it once may have been.

    The bridge itself is 247 meters long (9 wide) and was constructed in the 1st century BC as part of the Via Augusta, part of the Roman system of roads in what is now Spain. The foundations are all Roman but the bridge was subsequently lengthened to its present appearance by the Moors.

    I was in Cordoba during the feast of the Patron saint of the city, to whom there is small statue and shrine on the middle of the bridge. At the other end of the bridge is the Torre de la Calahorra, which housed a very informative small museum that i enjoyed very much

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  • Hosell's Profile Photo

    The Roman Bridge

    by Hosell Updated May 22, 2004

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    The Roman bridge right now,just have the name of its Roman roots.The present structure of the bridge is a medieval reconstruction,but is is very well conservated and still in use to cross through Guadalquivir River.There are some very nice views of the old town and Mosque from south bank.On this picture you can see a partial view of the bridge and at the end you can see Calahorra Tower aswell.

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  • Polly74's Profile Photo

    Roman Bridge over the Guadalquivir river

    by Polly74 Written Aug 5, 2004

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    Believed to be constructed by the Roman Emperor Augustus, it consists of 16 arches. Having undergone many changes throughout the centuries and suffering under many rebellions and battles, this bridge still stands proudly. Half way through the bridge a statue of Saint Raphael dating from 1,651, watches over the city. It is always in surrounded by flowers and small banners of the petitions from the devout Cordobenians since 1,648 it was attributed with sparing the city from the great epidemic that assailed it.

    The Bridge’s Gate, also known as the Arch of the Triumph, substitutes the original Roman arch and was built by order of King Philip II in 1,572.

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    ROMAN BRIDGE

    by zindara Written May 29, 2003

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    The Puente Romano over the Guadalquivir River although has been modified many times is still in use with the original bases. An image of St. Rafael Archangel guards the bridge. In one of the sides of the river there is a huge old waterwheel. It is worth a visit.

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  • Hopkid's Profile Photo

    Puente Romano

    by Hopkid Written Aug 30, 2005

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    This picturesque bridge runs from the Torre de la Calahorra on the south, across the Rio Guadalquivir, and end on the north side of the river just a block from the Mezquita. The bridge was once part of the old city walls.

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  • lina112's Profile Photo

    The bridge

    by lina112 Written Jul 5, 2007

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    roma bridge

    This bridge links the city with Calahorra castle and it is believed that it was built by Julius Caesar. It has 16 arches that are supported by robust semicircular abutments. It has a sculpture of San Rafael from 1651 in the middle.

    Este puente une la ciudad con el castillo de la Calahorra y se cree que fue construido por Julio César. Consta de 16 arcos apoyados en robustos estribos con tamajanes semicilíndricos. En el centro tiene una escultura de San Rafael de 1651.

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  • GentleSpirit's Profile Photo

    Triunfo de San Rafael

    by GentleSpirit Updated Mar 3, 2013

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    The Archangel Rafael appeared to a local priest, saying he would spare Cordoba from the ongoing plague. Once the plague subsided several monuments appeared to honor the archangel, who became the patron of the city. Rafael thus became the protector of the city.

    The triunfo at the end of the Roman Bridge is particularly ornate, very baroque. I was in Cordoba for the feast of San Rafael, so the monuments were all decorated and cleaned up for the festivities.

    There are 12 such monuments around the city, all show the archangel at the top of a column. Often there was a lantern that provided light to the area nearby. These were surrounded by fences.Basically the equivalent of the Plague Columns found in places that came under the rule of the Austrians.

    Cordoba was affected by the successive waves of the plague as early as 1349. The plagues of the 16th century were apparently the hardest ones on Cordoba, which by then had ceased to be the important political and commercial center it had once been.

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  • vibi68's Profile Photo

    The bridge that served great and vast nations

    by vibi68 Updated Oct 3, 2005

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    St-Rafael safely guards the Puente Romano

    The town of Cordoue located on the shores of Guadalquivir is universally known for its Mosque Cathedral. However, the city is not summarized solely with its Cathedral, indeed, Phoenicians, Romans, Wisigoths then Omeyyades Muslims built this 3000 year old city and left today a significant number of vestiges in an environment of flowered lanes where it is good to stroll safe from heat wave of August. The first major monument to introduce itself when entering the old city is the Roman bridge, a 240m long stonework resting on 16 arches which cross the Guadalquivir. Its construction dates from the Emperor Auguste's time, while it was restored from 719 to 721 by Al-Shamh, along with the forteress' walls. Crossing the Roman bridge from the Calahorra Tower towards the Puerta del Puente, a couple of vestiges of ancient windmills are still standing amongst the growing trees and plants on the left handside, while on the right handside silently stands a St-Rafael statue, patron of the city and always adorned by lit candles, for Cordobans are very devoted to their patron. At the end of the bridge, on the windmills side, the old Muslim waterwheel which used to bring water up to the Caliph's palace, sleeps peacefuly and safely after needing to be rebuilt, for Isabel the Catholic not being able to stand its skreetching noise, ordered its destruction. Right in front of the Puente Romano's crossing, faces the Puerta del Puente, the little Arc de Triomphe, the openned eye on the old city.

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  • euzkadi's Profile Photo

    A bridge over the Guadalquivir River.

    by euzkadi Updated May 21, 2009

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    One of the most famous contructions in Cordoba.. It was built under Roman Emperor Augustus commands. This large Roman bridge (330 metres long) consists in 16 arches that connects the city with the Torre de la Calahorra. In the middle of the bridge there´s a Statue of Saint Raphael from 1651. The bridge was very important during the Medieval times, when the people protected the city from the attacks of Peter the Cruel. The bridge has been restored several times, the last one in 2006, wich tried to return the original shape.

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    Sotos de la Albolafia.

    by euzkadi Written May 21, 2009

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    The area that surrounds the bridge is a small natural reserve called Sotos de la Albolafia, wich includes some mills as the San Antonio and the Almolafia (the last one appears in the city Coat of Arms). The reserve is an important nestling place for migrating birds.

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  • krissyM's Profile Photo

    Walk along the Roman bridge

    by krissyM Written Jun 20, 2007

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    The gate at the head of the Roman bridge

    We walked along the roman ridge to the other side. It didn't look like there was much over on the other side. The map didn't show much either. So we turned back. It was also 38oC and there was no shade.

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  • arlequin_g's Profile Photo

    Puente Romano (Roman Bridge)

    by arlequin_g Written Aug 4, 2003

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    Take a walk along this Roman Bridge and go to the other side to see Calahorra Tower wich is now a museum and it used to be a defense point of the city.
    Torre Calahorra (Calahorra Tower):
    Monday to Sunday: 10-14/16.30-20.30 (4 euros)

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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Roman Bridge

    by solopes Updated Mar 7, 2013

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    Cordova - Spain

    Linking the tower of Calahonda to the historic city, across the Puerta del Puente, this bridge with almost 2000 years still works, as the easiest way across the Guadalquivir in central Cordoba.

    Halfway there's a statue from the 16th century.

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  • Aitana's Profile Photo

    Roman Bridge

    by Aitana Written Jul 12, 2010

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    The bridge over the Guadalquivir was built in the Roman period, in the first century AD. It was the only bridge connecting both banks of the river until the 20th century, when San Rafael Bridge was built.

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