Sinagoga, Córdoba

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  • Sinagoga
    by Aitana
  • The eastern wall of the synagogia.
    The eastern wall of the synagogia.
    by unaS
  • Partially restored entry room.
    Partially restored entry room.
    by unaS
  • unaS's Profile Photo

    Unexpected discovery

    by unaS Updated Oct 10, 2009

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    The eastern wall of the synagogia.
    2 more images

    Just across the street and around the corner, close to the Casa Sefarad is the unexpected discovery of a synagogue during renovations of a "modern" building.

    This discovery helped to explain the 14th C room in the neighbouring Casa Sefarad as a probable mikva (ritual bath).

    The Eastern wall was discovered first. It´s typical form as that of a Synagogue of the period was a surprise. It was because of its sudden appearance during the renovations that the rest was dug out and is being conserved.

    Not yet developed there are no pamphlets, no guide, no explanations, so worth reading up about it before you visit. Details available at the Casa Sefarad.

    Entry free.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Sinagoga part 2 (the Synagogue)

    by Martin_S. Updated Jul 14, 2008

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    Sinagoga, Cordova, Spain
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    Just a few more photos to show the designs covering the interior of the Sinagoga here in Cordova. The balcony you can see in the photo was the place "reserved" for the Jewish women who were seperated from the men in the religious ceremonies, wonder which of the two groups thought of themselves as second class....

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Sinagoga part 1 (the Synagogue)

    by Martin_S. Written Jul 14, 2008

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    Sinagoga street sign, Cordova, Spain
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    The Sinagoga is no longer in use today as a Jewish house of worship, but you can still see hints of the richness of what it once was before the Jews were driven out of Spain. The walls are covered with Mudejar plaster work and you can see three small balconies with inscriptions on all. It is possible for a person who knows modern Hebrew to read these old and partially destroyed inscriptions, a high in itself being able to read these texts dating back to the 14th century..

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  • didgeridorien's Profile Photo

    Synagoga

    by didgeridorien Written Mar 4, 2008
    In the synagoge

    This is a Synagoge in the jewish neighbourhood. It had a couple of other functions in time, but recently it was discovered to be one of the oldest synagoges. It is damaged though because it had other uses.

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  • lina112's Profile Photo

    The Sinagogue

    by lina112 Updated Jul 5, 2007

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    inside
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    The Synagogue is situated in the centre of the jewish quarter, it is one of the three that exist in Spain. The building is Mudejar in style, and presides over the neighbourhood and its inhabitants. This neighbourhood is also home to the statue in honour of the wise Jew Maimónides. It has an irregular layout. It was an intellectual stronghold in the time of Abderramán III.

    En el centro del barrio judio se encuentra la Sinagoga, una de las tres existentes en España. Esta construcción es mudéjar, domina el barrio y la vida de sus habitantes. En este barrio también existe una estatua en honor del sabio judío Maimónides. Posee un trazado irregular. Fue reducto intelectual en época de Abderramán III.

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  • leplaya's Profile Photo

    Sinagoga

    by leplaya Updated Feb 24, 2007

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    This is one of three remaining synagogues in Spain (the other two being in Toledo). It is a pretty small place, only one room. Outside it’s pretty difficult to distinguish it from any of the other buildings around the place, except that there’s a statue of the Jewish philosopher, Maimonides next to the entrance. Inside, it has Moorish designs that are very similar to the ones seen in the mosques in southern Spain, except that instead of Arabic, there is Hebrew writing. The room is empty otherwise. Apparently there is an entrance fee (0.35 euro), but we were just waived in. It’s worth a stop just for the historical reasons. There is a Sephardic Jewish museum across the street, but it really isn’t worth going to.

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Sinagoga

    by MM212 Updated May 21, 2006

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    Mud��jar style synagogue
    2 more images

    La Sinagoga was built in the early 14th century after Córdoba fell back into Christian hands. It is a small building in the distinctive Mudéjar architectural style. Hebrew scripts cover the walls along with Islamic decorative motifs. This synagogue lies in la Judería, the Jewish quarter which existed during Moorish times.

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  • vibi68's Profile Photo

    The last and oldest Jewish testimony

    by vibi68 Updated Oct 3, 2005

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    The synagogue

    The synagogue is situated in the Juderia, on Judíos street, just a few yards away from the small square called Tiberíades where the monument to the famous Doctor-Philosopher Maimonides stands. The synagaogue was built around the year 5075 judaic time or 1315 christian time and used to be neighbouring many other syanagogues, but this is the only one remaining in Cordoba. After the Jews were banished from Spain in 1492, the synagogue was transformed into a hospital for hydrophobic people, called Hospital de Santa Quiteria. In 1588, it became property of the brotherhood of the shoemakers' corporation under the patronage of St. Crispin and St. Crispiniano and began to be used for their chapters and worshipping of its patron saints. In the 19th century, its panelling was replaced with a barrel vault and plasterwork, since its old roof was falling to pieces. Don Mariano Parraga, a priest working there, discovered in 1884 the plasterwork on its walls when part of the mortared walls of the synagogue fell down. A year later, it was declared national monument as its restoration began. It is usual among Jewish ways to not have a direct entrance from the street to the synagogue, but from the crossing of a small yard. The main entrance is situated to the right of this yard and the Guard's House is on the left. There are two rooms in the building: a small atrium and the proper praying room. To the right of the porch there is a flight of stairs that go up to the women's gallery, the place where they could stay while religious services lasted. The lower part of the walls has lost its previous decoration, but the rich plasterwork decoration of Mudejar figures in the upper part, a beautiful example of how Jewish people employed Mudejar artists in their buildings, gives a rough idea of the original beauty of the building. The ornaments of the synagogue is made of several atauriques: ornamental raised works common to Arab art, forming four, six, and eight corner stars, mixed with Mauresque vegetable figures.

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  • Hopkid's Profile Photo

    Medieval Sinagoga

    by Hopkid Written Aug 22, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Women's gallery at the Sinagoga

    The old synagogue in the Juderia section of Cordoba was built in 1315 and is very small. It has some cool medujar decorations on the walls which I found to be very interesting. Ther is also a women's choir upstairs that looks down on the main floor. There is not admission charge (there wasn't one when were there although my Lonely Planet guidebook said it was 0.30 euro).and is definitely worth a look as you wander the streets of the old Jewish Quarter.

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  • The Synagogue

    by blint Written Dec 14, 2004

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    The only gold in the synagogue;unlike the catedral

    One of the best parts of the Juderia is the lovely 14th century Sinagoga.

    It is open 10-2 then 3:30-5:30 Tuesdays to Saturdays and 10-1:30 on Sundays and festivals. It is free to us lucky EU citizens.

    Go while you've got the chance there aren't many other Synagogues in Spain thanks to the Spanish inquisition.

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  • Maymuna's Profile Photo

    Synagogue

    by Maymuna Updated Apr 6, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    This is a very small synagogue in the Jewish quarter of Córdoba. It is the only synagogue in Córdoba that is still well-preserved.

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  • Aitana's Profile Photo

    Sinagoga

    by Aitana Written Jun 4, 2010

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    This is one of the three Sinagogues that still stand in Spain. The others are in Toledo.
    Part of the original decoration is preserved.

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  • leplaya's Profile Photo

    Maimonides

    by leplaya Written Feb 24, 2007

    The statue of the 12th century Jewish philosopher is in front of the Sinagoga. He was born in Cordoba in 1135 (though he didn’t stay there long).

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Synagogue

    by Jim_Eliason Written Jul 4, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Synagogue

    This Synagogue was turned into a Christian church after the reconquest. However like the Mezsquita the latter inhabitants retained the unique Jewish designs.

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  • alucas's Profile Photo

    Moises Mainonides

    by alucas Written Feb 20, 2005

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    Statue of Moises Mainonides

    Close to the Sinagoga there is a statue of the Jewish philosopher, Moises Mainonides, who was born in Cordoba in 1135 AD

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