Frigiliana Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by leics
  • Things to Do
    by leics
  • View from outside the factory
    View from outside the factory
    by leics

Most Recent Things to Do in Frigiliana

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Follow the history..........

    by leics Written Jan 18, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    ...but, if you don't read Spanish, make sure you go to the Tourist Information office in Casa del Apero (see tip) first, so you can pay 1 euro and get an English-language translation!

    There are 12 ceramic plaques set throughout Frigiliana's oldest quarter. They tell the story, in Spanish, of the 'Battle of the Rock' in 1569, when the local Moorish inhabitants sought safety in the fortress of Frigiliana. Many of them (including the elderly, women and children) were eventually slaughtered with great brutality when the Christian forces finally battled their way into the settlement.

    Each plaque has extracts from books (seven of which were written in the early 1600s) telling of how the Moors lived in the area, why they fled to Frigiliana and finally about the battle itself.

    It is well worth getting the English translation first, for the plaques are marked on a streetmap and they will lead you around the narrow streets as you explore...and, maybe, they will give you just a tiny glimpse of what once was.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Put a euro or 50 eurocents in the slot......

    by leics Updated Jan 18, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I found this rather odd.

    In at least two old-town Frigiliana locations...and there may be more...I found old-style coin-in-the-slot 'mechanical theatre' machines.You know, the type where the coin makes the clown laugh uproariously, or sets in motion a chain of events displayed within?

    I hadn't seen any of those for decades and was (still am) intrigued as to why they exist in Frigiliana. They are clearly newish, and I suspect are made by local craftspeople.

    Quite why they exist, or where the money goes, I do not know. But they are certainly a unique aspect of visiting the village.

    You'll find two very large 'mechanical theatres' back-to-back a few steps away from the bus stop. One is entitled 'The Moor and his parrot' and the other shows two old Frigilianians (almost life-sized) sitting around a table. I saw that one in operation...a bit of chat about Frigiliana history, a bit about what it was like to live there in earlier decades (before the 60s), a few jokes....clever, certainly, and quite informative.

    Deeper into the historical heart of the village I found four more. Two tiny peepholes in a door, through which you were invited to look (they were only 20 cents), 'La Maravillosa Vista de la Mer' and ..intriguingly...the 'Harem Fantastico'.

    I didn't have any change on me so I didn't put any money into the machines. But if you visit it might well be worth putting a euro or two into them. The one I saw was very cleverly done.

    The Moor and his parrot. Harem fantastico Look through the peepholes.... La maravillosa vista del mar.... This is the street......
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Family Travel
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Iglesia de San Antonio de Padua

    by leics Written Jan 18, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This whitewashed church is set in the heart of Frigiliana's oldest quarter...the heart of what was once a Moorish settlement. It is thought by some historians that there may have been an earlier chapel on the siote....and by others that the church is built on the site of Frigiliana's mosque. Either seems quite likely to me, but the fact that it was built in 1676 firmly underlined the fact that Frigiliana was now in Christian hands.

    And yet...some elements of mudejar architecture do exist even in this church. The beautifully-carved wooden ceiling, for example.

    Originally the church was the earthen colour of its bricks: the palster and whitewash was applied in later centuries.

    Inside is a calm, cool space with some attractive painted decoration over two of the nave arches. I believe these were discovered during fairly recent renovations and date back to the original church, when the whole interior is likely to have been painted.

    Exterior Interior Decorated arch Carved wooden ceiling
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Casa del Apero 1: the museum

    by leics Written Jan 18, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Frigiliana's museum is pretty tiny but it has some very interesting exhibits. More importantly, from my point of view, it had enough English-language labelling for me to understand quite a lot about how the settlement has developed since prehistoric times.

    It is well worth visiting the museum before you explore the village itself (I didn't, unfortunately). Not only will you be able to get an idea of how what we now call Frigiliana has changed and grown over the millennia but, perhaps more importantly, you will be in the Tourist Information office. And from the Tourist Information office you can get English-language maps and leaflets about the village and surroundings (including excellent walking maps for the hills and valleys) which will make your visit much more interesting.

    I particularly recommend spending just a euro and buying the English translation of the 12 ceramic plaques set around the ancient heart of the settlement and which tell its story. I bought mine after I'd spent a couple of hours wandering around: I wish I'd bought it beforehand.

    When you are pondering the museum exhibits, don't miss the ordinary-looking chunk of stone on display. It may look like nothing special but it is in fact a very ancient (thousands of years old) stone mould for casting bronze knives. And there is still a little bronze left on the stone from its last casting. That is something pretty special, imo.

    Definitely a 'must-visit', imo...make it your first stop after you get off the bus. Free and open year-round, at the same times as the tourist information centre (see next tip).

    The prehistoric stone mould...... Prehistoric cremation urns Part of the museum
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Casa del Apero 2: views and tourist info....

    by leics Written Jan 18, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    ......and free, clean toilets (a big plus anywhere, imo).

    Frigiliana's little tourist information office (with very pleasant and helpful staff), along with its museum, a small exhibition space and the library, is housed in the rather lovely Casa del Apero, up the road to your right as you stand facing the Ingenio (signed for the museum).

    Casa del Apero is a fascinating building and although it has been substantially renovated and restored (in the late 1990s) it still retains a real atmosphere of 'what once was'.

    The building dates from the early 1600s and may have been built in relation to the Ingenio, possibly for storage and stabling relating to the sugar mill.....or may simply have been built to provide general storage and stabling. A series of what were once stables almost entirely encloses a courtyard, with a further, galleried storey above.

    Once you enter the courtyard there is a noticeable drop in noise levels from the village outside the doors. And if you climb the exterior steps to the second level there are superb views from a 'mirador' overlooking the village and, in the other direction, a 'defensive tower ' (I have no idea whether this was its original purpose) which looks out over the surrounding mountains and deep valley below.

    The tourist office, and thus Casa del Apero, is open year-round. It's well worth visiting.

    Winter (09/16-06/30)
    Mon-Fri: 10:00-1730 Sat, Sun, holidays: 10:00-1400 and 1600-1800

    Summer (07/01-09/15)
    Mon-Fri: 1000-1530 1700-2100 Sat, Sun, holidays: 1000-1400, 1600-2000

    Stabling and second storey...... Views one way......... ....and the other way.
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Wander the oldest part of the village.

    by leics Written Jan 18, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Calle Real, and the narrow streets, alleyways and steps which run off it, form the historical heart of Frigiliana. Surfaces are cobbled, some 'streets' are stepped and many are quite steep....a few are very steep...so it's not ideal for those with mobility difficulties nor even for push-chairs (it will be a long, hard push and a rather bumpy ride!). The old village is, in typical Medieval style, a bit of a maze with buildings set close together to provide some shady relief from the harsh Spanish sun as well as some protection from the chillier winter winds.

    This part of the village largely dates from the time of the Moorish settlement, and its architecture reflects Moorish styles. It is most beautifully kept up with pristine whitewash, blue-painted doors, plants in pots along entryways and on window-ledges.

    The reconstruction, renovation and modernisation the village has undergone since it became a popular spot for ex-pats, artists, craftspeople and holiday-home-owners has..in my opinion...more-or-less smothered any real indication of its age, and its original architecture, under a pretty duvet of 'twee'. Does that sound harsh? Frigiliana is indeed very lovely to explore but, for me, there was something lacking...........

    Whether you agree with my opinion or not, there is no doubt that a wander around the old part of the village will provide you with many, many attractive sights and photo-opportunities as well as a fairly large number of shopping opportunities, for many of the above-mentioned craftspeople and artists have shops in the village.

    Stepped street Calle Real Alleyways, steps and plants...... Into a courtyard.......... Another stepped, narrow street.....
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Penon de la Sabina

    by leics Written Jan 15, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You'll see sign to the 'Penon de la Sabina' as you walk up through the 'old town' part of the village. There are steep-ish steps up to, and past it, onto a higher-level street

    The Penon is a huge, huge rock which was dislodged from the top of the mountain in January 1936 by heavy rains in 1936 and crashed down onto the village below. It was obviously a massive disaster for residents, killed several people and made headline news for days. It was called 'the mountain of death' because, apparently, several of those killed 'disappeared' forever underneath the massive rock.

    It is now fixed to its resting site by heavy steel cables, so it almost certainly will not move again.

    I couldn't take a photo of the risk itself..the angles were impossible...but the climb up is worth it for the lovely views across the 'old town', into the valley and the hills beyond. In fact googlemaps has it marked as the 'Mirador' (viewpoint) of La Sabina.

    View from La Sabina 1 View from La Sabina 2 View from La Sabina 3
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Los Reales Positos

    by leics Written Jan 15, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This building is on Calle Real, to the left as you stand in front of El Ingenio and on your left as you begin to walk up Calle Real.

    It was built in 1767 by the lords of Frigiliana and was originally a granary, intended to store grain in case of hard times (Frigiliana has had many of those over the centuries.). The frontage has some lovely brick arches.

    It is thought that the building may have been constructed on the site of the village jail.

    the lord of Frigiliana, of course, set the price of all the grain grown on his lands. So I'm not sure how beneficial this grainstore actually was to the ordinary folk of the village...especially in hard times......

    Nowadays the building is used for homes, and for several small shops and bars.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Ingenio Nuestra Señora del Carmen

    by leics Written Jan 15, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The magnificent 16th-century 'manor house' ('mansion' would be a better word) of Ingenio Nuestra Señora del Carmen (also called Palacio de los Condes de Frigiliana) is the first thing you notice when you get off the bus. It towers over Frigiliana's Calle Real and the large-ish square where the bus stops, and is clearly old.

    But you can't visit it...it's now the only 'cane honey' (molasses?) factory in Europe, so there's no public access. The factory has existed for 75 years and it seems likely from documentation that the building was used as a sugar mill since the early 1700s.

    The manor house was built in Renaissance style, using various materials..including those easily to hand, such as stones from Frigiliana's 'castle'. It was built for the lords of Frigiliana...the Manrique de Lara family...and remained in use as a family home until it was changed into a sugar factory.

    You can't see a great deal from the outside. There are a couple of niches for statues (long gone) in the exterior wall, two sundials and the faintest reminders of the exterior painted sgraffito decoration which clearly existed at some point in the building's history.

    I can absolutely understand why the factory doesn't want visitors, especially as it's a food production factory. But it is a pity that there is no way to visit the interior, perhaps outside working hours.

    At least one can see it though....and if you look to its right (you'll get a good view from the top of the Tourist information Office roof) you can see the arches and walls of the village's early defences.

    There are a couple of small ceramics shops in the lower levels, opening onto the street, and a bar/restaurant to the right-hand side as you face the building (quite a good view of the arches and walls from there too).

    View from outside the factory
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • lina112's Profile Photo

    Old Town

    by lina112 Updated Mar 10, 2011

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The old town of Frigiliana, Moorish-Mudejar origin, is without doubt one of the best preserved of the entire province. Walk along it at any time of day, is a delight and a unique experience

    El casco antiguo de Frigiliana, de origen morisco-mudejar, es sin duda uno de los mejor conservados de toda la provincia. Pasear por él a cualquier hora del día, es una delicia y una experiencia única.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Road Trip
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • lina112's Profile Photo

    Church of San Antonio de Padua

    by lina112 Written Mar 10, 2011

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The church of San Antonio de Padua was built in the XVII century (1676) and restored a century later. It has three naves separated by pilasters and covered by a wooden frame to the transept, where there stands a hemispherical dome crowned with a lantern. The cover is simple, with elongated arch on which there is a coat of Fray Alonso de Santo Tomás. The bell tower is unique in that the last two bodies of the three that has double arches present

    La iglesia de San antonio de Padua fue edificada en el siglo XVII (1676) y reformada un siglo más tarde. Consta de tres naves separadas por pilastras y cubiertas por armadura de madera hasta el crucero, parte donde se levanta una bóveda semiesférica rematada con linterna. La portada es sencilla, con arco de medio punto alargado sobre el que hay un escudo de Fray Alonso de Santo Tomás. La torre campanario tiene la singularidad de que los dos últimos cuerpos de los tres que tiene presentan dobles arcos.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Photography
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • lina112's Profile Photo

    Archaeological Museum

    by lina112 Written Mar 10, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Frigiliana Archaeological Museum has an interesting collection of objects found at different sites of the municipality that demonstrate the rich history of this town. Is integrated in the Andalusian and national network of museums and is the only of its kind in the entire region of Axarquia and the few in the province.

    El Museo Arqueológico de Frigiliana presenta una interesante colección de objetos encontrados en diferentes yacimientos del término municipal que dan muestra del rico pasado histórico de nuestro municipio. Se encuentra integrado en la red andaluza y nacional de museos y es el único de estas características en toda la comarca de la Axarquía y de los pocos de la provincia.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Road Trip
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • ranger49's Profile Photo

    Take a walk with history.

    by ranger49 Updated Jul 14, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    For about 100 years after 1487 (the Christian conquest) this area was notable for the co-existence of Jews, Muslims and Christians. But the Muslims were increasingly stripped of all their rights - to speak their own language, practise their customs and religion, suppressed and relegated to the worst and least fertile land. A rebellion was attempted only to be be strogly repelled and savagely put down when the local Christian forces enlisted the help of the Italian Fleet, with terrible loss of life among the Muslim population.
    The battle known as the Penon de Frigiliana ended this period, the Muslims who survived were expelled or escaped and Christians from neighboring areas occupied their property.

    The history of the village is pictured in a series of ceramic plaques . Guided tours leave from the tourist office in the morning and afternoon (according to season ) and stop at each of the 12 wall plates to tell of the events depicted there.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Street Views

    by GibJoe Written May 11, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    What attracted me to Frigiliana is the street views, in my opinion Frigiliana is one the most beautiful white towns I have seen. Have a look at the photos, although VT does not do justice to the photos!

    Was this review helpful?

  • spanishguy's Profile Photo

    Old Fountain - Fuente Vieja

    by spanishguy Updated Feb 18, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This fountain was erected by the Count of Frigiliana in the 17th century, that's why it has the family's coat of arms. It's attached to a house and it was used as drinking trough for animals.

    Esta fuente fue levantada por el Conde de Frigiliana en el siglo XVII, y es por esto que tiene el escudo de su familia en el centro. Está pegada a una casa se utilizaba como abrevadero para animales.

    Old ountain - Fuente Vieja Old Fountain - Fuente Vieja

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Frigiliana

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

35 travelers online now

Comments

Frigiliana Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Frigiliana things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Frigiliana sightseeing.

View all Frigiliana hotels