Unique Places in Granada

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Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Granada

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    Inhabitant of Granada and his donkey

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Apr 27, 2014

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    After visit to Alhambra, Cathedral and Royal Chapel it's very pleasant to meet such an amasing sculpture group off the beaten path!

    You can watch my 5 min 31 sec about Video Along Granada by bus in the evening out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

    Granada - Inhabitant and his donkey Inhabitant and his donkey
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    Explore Realejo

    by leics Written Apr 5, 2014

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    I wonder how many visitors explore the Realejo quarter? Like Albaicin it is an ancient settlement...but the Realejo existed long before the Moors conquered Spain in the 700s. It was the Jewish quarter...and Granada was once called 'the city of the Jews'.

    It was the Jews who rebelled against their Visigoth rulers and opened the gates to allow the Moorish invaders in, and the two groups lived in harmony for centuries....until the Christians took power in 1492. Jews had to convert, leave or be killed and Realejo was destroyed, to be gradually rebuilt over subsequent centuries.

    I took two long and quite strenuous wanders (it's a steep-sided hill!) around Realejo. I initially wanted to find the Mirador Puerta del Sol but it took two attempts...the hillside streets of Realejo are a maze of narrow, twisting, stepped alleyways which were simply not accurately marked out on any of the 3 maps I had to hand. It is the lower-level streets where the mansions and palazzi were built, and those streets are much easier to navigate.

    Eventually I did find the mirador and was rewarded with a southerly panorama of the city.

    It's well worth taking a couple of hours to wander and explore this area. In its upper reaches there is a real feel for how Granada was in later Medieval times ,although it is clear that much renovation and restoration is ongoing...I think it may be quite a sought-after residential area. There's a small Jewish museum too, although it wasn't open when I passed by.

    Realejo is on the hillside to the south of the Alhambra outcrop. You can start to explore by taking Calle Paveneras from Plaza Isabel La Catolica. A statue of the 11th century Jewish scholar and poet who lived in Realejo, Yehuda Ibn Tibon, marks the beginning of the district.

    Yehuda Ibn Tibon Mirador Puerta del Sol Realejo street Ancient house
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    Iglesia San Gregorio Betico

    by leics Written Mar 24, 2014

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    This church is on the slopes of the Albaicin district, at the top of Calle Cardereria Nueva where it opens out into Placeta de San Gregorio, once the site of a daily market.

    It is said that it is built on the site of the dungeons where Christian prisoners were held captive by the Moorish rulers. For that reason this small church was built on the site in the early 1500s and dedicated to San Gregori Betico, Bishop of Iliberis. The church soon required restoration and rebuilding, which was completed by 1593.

    The church remained a place of worship until the 1800s, when it became first a warehouse and then a dance hall of ill-repute until returning to its original purpose in 1887. It was damaged by fire in the mid-1930s and was abandoned in 1942, but in the 1950s a community of Poor Clares (a fully-enclosed order) moved into the adjoining convent building and took the church as their own.

    It is a church of 'perpetual worship'. There is always a nun sitting in front of the altar, contemplating and praying, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. It took me some time to notice her when I visited...the long, pure white clothing of this order made her appear almost ghost-like in the candle-lit gloom. When I did spot her I left immediately. For me, it feels to intrusive to explore further when someone present is in the act of worship.

    It's not a particularly special building in architectural terms but it is worth popping in if you happen to be in the area (and as it is at the top of the main street of 'Little Morocco' you may well be).

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    Iglesia San Gil e Santa Ana

    by leics Written Mar 24, 2014

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    Annoyingly, I never managed to find this church open. I've now found out that it is open only for Mass (1800 most days of the week), which makes it a bit tricky to visit because imo wandering around during Mass is neither respectful nor appropriate.

    But it struck me as a most lovely and ancient building set in a beautiful spot by the river Darro at the far end of Plaza Nueva (the 'square' at that point is called Plaza Santa Ana).

    The church dates from 1537 and, inevitably, was built on the site of a mosque. Its slender brick tower, with its glazed tiles, reminded me of a minaret...I wonder if that was a deliberate act by its Mudejar builders? If so, it was obviously found acceptable by the Christian community..perhaps as a way of drawing in new believers?

    There are five chapels inside, leading off the central nave, and some important artwork.

    Perhaps you'll be lucky enough to find it open when you visit.

    River Darro
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    Palacio de Abrantes

    by leics Written Mar 24, 2014

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    I know this rather lovely 'palace' is now a school of philosophy, because the nice man inside told me when I was seeking the Tourist information office.

    But no matter. :-) The Palacio de Abrantes dates from the 1500s, originally just one floor and a tower but remodelled in the 1800s into its present form: two floors, accessed via an entrance hall. Its frontage, and the entrance hall, remain pretty-much in their original form..it is the rest of the building which has been changed.

    I was very taken by the beautiful archway in the entrance and have since found out that it iq indeed a re-used piece of Nasrid architecture. It seems the original building had other re-used stonework, including Arabic columns, as well as Mudejar-style wooden ceilings.

    The building was originally constructed for Don Antonio de Bobadilla and Peñalosa, and oyu can see the coats of arms for those two families outside the entrance.

    I don't know if it is possible to visit the interior but you can certainly get a glimpse of that lovely Nasrid arch if the door is open. :-)

    You'll find the building on the narrow Calle Mariana Pineda, which runs off Plaza Carmen towards Plaza Isabel la Catolica.

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    Corral del Carbon

    by leics Written Mar 24, 2014

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    This building is the oldest existing Moorish structure in Granada itself, as opposed to those on the Alhambra outcrop.

    The Corral del Carbon dates from the 1300s and was originally a warehouse and merchants complex. A beautifully-decorated entrance archway leads into a wide courtyard around which are set three stories of rooms, originally premises for craftsmen, merchants and so on. I've visited a caravanseri of very similar design, albeit larger, in Northern Cypriot Nicosia.

    Later, under Christian rule, the building was first used for storing charcoal (hence its name) and then functioned as a theatre until 1593, then became a house. It was created a national monument in 1918 but restoration and renovation was only completed in 2006.

    I had no intention of visiting this building. I came across it entirely unexpectedly whilst attempting to find the Tourist Information office. I was told that such an office existed inside....and it does, but it is only for local residents (so the pleasant office ladies told me). But the superb entrance arch alone is worth seeking out. I was very pleased to have come across it.

    You'll find the building on the narrow Calle Mariana Pineda, which runs off Plaza Carmen towards Plaza Isabel la Catolica. Open Monday -Friday 0900 -1900 and Saturday/Sunday from 1000- 1400. No entrance fee.

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    a little piece of heaven on earth ...

    by amapola66 Written Jun 18, 2011

    If you have a car, you must go here. we stumbled across this lake on our way to the natural springs, we had to stop - what a view, just beautiful. We intend to return and stay a litle longer...
    It's by Pantamo de los Bermejales - there is a campsite. What a place, I will report back when we have stayed longer. Meanwhile there is a link to a map below.

    Pantano de los Bermejales mountains Pantano de los Bermejales Bantano de los Bermejales Bantano de los bermejales
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    Gorgeous center and interesting collection

    by Cocolin Written Apr 26, 2011

    The Museum of Memory in Granada holds a very interesting collection on the history of Andalusia and Spain.

    Rare for museums in general, the explanations provided are clear, interesting, to the point and in correct English. There is a superb interactive presentation- or is it a comics?- that works literally on the click of your fingers. Fascinating for children and adults alike.

    The building itself is a treat designed by Baez.

    And to top it all, it has temporary exhibitions -Wang Qingsong's photography, when we were there, and cultural activities.

    The downside? Dare I say - the invincible siesta: you need to be out by 2 PM in the afternoon but you may return at 4 PM.

    Time line of Andalusia
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    Carmen de los martires

    by saschlet Updated May 6, 2010

    Have a look on www.granadatur.com and get a "plano oficial" and you will see near the Alhambra complex a small area called Carmen de los Martires. This is a charming little park. We went there and wandered about for almost an hour amid the lush green trees, peacocks and fountains. We only saw one other person there! A nice place to rest after charging around the Alhambra.

    We used the Guide to Granada way more than any guide book. It has great itineraries on it.

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    Casa Museu Manuel de Falla

    by berenices Written Apr 9, 2010

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    Except for lovers of classical music, this tiny gem of a place will likely not figure in most tourists' places to visit in Granada. Manuel de Falla is one of Spain's greatest composers (1876-1946, his best known piece is Noches en los Jardines de España), who lived in Granada for 18 years, in this small, almost nondescript house, just off the Alhambra. Before the visit, I only knew a bit of his music, but this little museum which looked exactly how it was when he was still living there was a revelation about the man behind the music -- very devout, exacting, and a hypochondriac. I had an especially memorable time because one of the visitors (there were only 3 of us) was a French musician and he was asked by the museum guide to in fact play something on Falla's piano. So the guy did, and it was just sheer joy to be there to experience the moment!

    Falla's medicine boxes Playing on Manuel de Falla's piano
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    Capitania General

    by SirRichard Written Jan 13, 2010

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    These army headquarters are located in the centre, in San Matias Street. I went in by chamce, as they were announcing a Xmas event in the patio. You can't visit the whole building, but the central patio (see pic) is a real wonder and woth the visit f you pass by.

    The patio Capitania General
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    Olive Trees

    by keeweechic Written Aug 23, 2009

    Through the countryside you will see olive groves. Spain is known for producing more olives than another country and also consuming more than any other country. The traditional growing area is in the province of Granada. Some 1.3 million olive trees are found in Andalucia.

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    Plaza de Toros

    by call_me_rhia Updated Mar 17, 2008

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    Something is changing in Spain, and Granada's Plaza de Toros (bullring) is changing purpose. Ok, March to November it is still used for corridas about 20 times a year, but the rest of the time it has other priorities- it is also (and especially) a fancy restaurant center and nightspot.

    Visitors should go there top enjoy the several food opportunities, including a flamenco bar and restaurant (Ole Ole) and to admire its architecture, modelled after the ancient Roman amphitheatres. The bullring is located at 25 Avenida Doctor Olóriz.

    Plaza de Toros

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    Palacio de Congresos y Exposiciones

    by call_me_rhia Updated Mar 17, 2008

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    The Palacio de Congresos y Exposiciones is a very green and modern Conference and Exhibition Centre in the new part of Granada and - as the name suggests - is used for large meetings, fairs, conferences as well as for concerts. There are meeting facilities for up to 2000 people, and you cna laso find a restaurant there and two cafeterias.

    Although there is not much to see inside, it is still possible to visit the centre. However it is best admired from the outside than from the inside. It's not worth just going there for the sake of it, but if you are planning on visiting the Science Park, which is not too far, then it's worth to stop by and take a look. The Centre is located on Tierno Galván, and you can reach it with bus number 1 or 3.

    installation by the centre

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    Monasterio de la Cartuja

    by call_me_rhia Updated Mar 16, 2008

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    The Monasterio de la Cartuja is a beautiful Carthusian monastery located in the Cartuja area of town. It's a baroque monastery of the 16th century and it no longer functions as a monastery, it was confiscated and many of the buildings within its precint destroyed. If you visit, you should look out for the Doric arches and intricate decorations, sculptures and carvings of the Sacristy.

    When it functioned as a monastery, however, it was inhabited by a group of very austere monks who lived under a vow of silence, who would spend their days praying and meditating, and who left the convent only 3 or 4 times a year. Those monks would also not take their meals as a community, but in their cells, except on Sundays and Holy days - they also did not eat meat and on Fridays their diet would consist of bread and water, only.

    The monastery is located on Paseo de la Cartuja. Take bus number 8 and C from the Gran Via to get there. You can visit the monastery Monday-Saturday, 10am-1pm and 4-8pm, and Sunday 10am-12pm. Please keep in mind that in winter the closing time is at 6pm.

    Monasterio de la Cartuja

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