Albaicin, Granada

4.5 out of 5 stars 74 Reviews

Albaicin neighbourhood

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Albaicin
    by leics
  • Albaicin
    by leics
  • El Albaicín from la Alhambra
    El Albaicín from la Alhambra
    by Aitana
  • travelife's Profile Photo

    Al-Baycin 4

    by travelife Updated May 22, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Even today, the many patterns of life, repeated time and again, continues--the market, the cafe, the bakery, butcher, cheese shop, and wine merchant. granadans buy their daily produce just beside the Gate of the Weights, on Plaza Larga, as the Arabs, and then the Moriscos and the Spaniards have done for 800 years.

    albaicin seen from Alcazaba

    Was this review helpful?

  • lina112's Profile Photo

    El Albaicin

    by lina112 Updated Feb 29, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Is one of the oldest and most popular district in Granada. Is a delight walking by its narrows and pave street and the best is when you reach plaza san nicolas and from the balcony you can see la alhambra.

    Es uno de los barrios mas antiguos y populares de Granada. Es un placer caminar por sus empedradas y estrechas calles, pero lo mejor es cuando llegas a la plaza de san nicolas y las vistas de la alhambra desde el mirador.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • travelife's Profile Photo

    Al-Baycin 1

    by travelife Updated May 22, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site that also ecompasses the Alhambra Palace, the Albaycin counts as one of the most unique and comfortable historical neighborhoods in the world, a place where people still live their lives following traditional patterns hundreds of years old. However, the cars do struggle to pass through the narrow streets of Albaicin.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • travelife's Profile Photo

    Al-Baicin 2

    by travelife Updated May 22, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Albaycin quarter of Granada, once its own entire Moorish metropolis, spreads across a hill as impressive as the prominence on which the Alhambra Palace seems to float. Each directly across from the other, both hills emerge above the Vega, the plain, of greater Granada, and constitute a valley to the rear of which hides Sacromonte, the gypsy quarter, the land of flamenco and cave dwellings. This whitewashed array of houses and ruins constitutes a stunning example of aesthetic balance and humane social space.

    Was this review helpful?

  • travelife's Profile Photo

    The Mosque of Granada 2

    by travelife Updated May 22, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The mosque is composed of three main, contrasting elements. These are: the garden, the prayer hall (which is properly speaking the mosque itself) and the Centre for Islamic Studies. The garden looks out over the valley of the river Dorro towards a vista of Alhambra standing on the mount of Sabika, etched against the peaks of the Sierra Nevada.

    Mosque of Granada

    Was this review helpful?

  • andal13's Profile Photo

    Albayzín

    by andal13 Updated Jul 10, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is the ancient Moorish district, a charming place with steep and narrow streets and ancient houses; at Albayzín there is a belvedere, called San Nicolás, where you can enjoy a beautiful sight of Alhambra.

    Este es el antiguo barrio árabe, un lugar encantador con callecitas estrechas y empinadas y casas antiguas; en el Alabyzín hay un mirador, San Nicolás, desde donde se puede disfrutar de una espectacular vista de la Alhambra.

    Mirador San Nicol��s

    Was this review helpful?

  • andal13's Profile Photo

    Ribera del Darro

    by andal13 Updated Jul 10, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    River Darro goes through Granada; its riverbanks have many ancient and charming buildings, full of history and tales; take a time to walk along them.

    El río Darro atraviesa Granada; sus riberas tienen numerosos edificios antiguos y preciosos, llenos de historias y leyendas; tómate el tiempo para caminar por ellos.

    R��o Darro

    Was this review helpful?

  • BerniShand's Profile Photo

    THE ALBAICIN

    by BerniShand Written Nov 20, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    the Albaicin is the name given to the area bordered by the Alhambra, Sacromonte, the Plaza Nueve and the Calle Elvira, originally it was a walled city, the Puerta de Elvira is well over 1,000 years old and is the last remaining city gate. After the conquest of Granada the Moorish residents left the area and their mosques were destroyed or converted to catholic churches

    as you walk up the narrow streets its easy to lose all sense of time and direction, then suddenly you will come to a small busy plaza, and find your way back to your route and to this century
    walk up to the Mirador and Church of San Nicholas, from the terrace there is a stunning view of the Alhambra, there are many tiny churches in the Albaicin to peek inside and several good museums

    I think I would be hesitant to walk along some of the quiet streets at night, I would stick to the busy well lit areas, but do an evening visit to the souk and the tea shops and you will feel that you are in North Africa not Spain

    the Puerta de Elvira
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • jamiesno's Profile Photo

    The Old Moorish Quarters.

    by jamiesno Written Mar 1, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    From the city center it is worth taking a walk to the old moorish quarters. Be warned that it is up hill but worth the adventure. Remember it is all downhill on the way back. During my visit I was able to get some great views of the Alhambra at night and venturing into the narrow streets reminded me of Morocco. If you enjoy learning and witnessing the different influences on the architecture this is a great walk and it doesn't cost anything!

    Clock Tower in Old Moorish Quarters.

    Was this review helpful?

  • mcbeal_ally's Profile Photo

    El Albaicín

    by mcbeal_ally Written Apr 17, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    El Albaicín is the old Moorish quarter of the city. It's located on a hill facing the Alhambra and there are dramatic views of this area from the palace's famous rose gardens. The Zirid Monarchs first established their court here in the 11th century although little remains from this era today, apart from some crumbling remains of the wall (including the section which used to encircle the Albaicín and the gates of El Arco de las Pesas, Monaita and Elvira).
    It rises on a hill facing the Alhambra and many tourists journey into the Albaicin primarily for the spectacular views of the Alhambra from the viewing point by the church of San Nicolas.

    Was this review helpful?

  • barbskie's Profile Photo

    The Moorish Quarter

    by barbskie Updated Mar 24, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    El Albaicín is the old Moorish quarter of the city. It is located on a hill facing the Alhambra and there are gorgeous views of this area from the palace's famous rose gardens. The Zirid Monarchs first established their court here in the 11th century although little remains from this era today, apart from some crumbling remains of the wall (including the section which used to encircle the Albaicín and the gates of El Arco de las Pesas, Monaita and Elvira).

    Was this review helpful?

  • travelife's Profile Photo

    Al-Baycin 3

    by travelife Updated May 22, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Completely paved in stone, meandering streets and alleys spell out a venture in time not just to Mudejar Andalusia, but back to Moorish times and Europe’s last Islamic caliphate. Much of the Albaycin still cannot be reached by even the tiniest car, yet the neighborhood lacks the claustrophobic, shut-in feel of many Medieval European hill towns in France or central Italy. The Albaycin is not really Medieval at all, except perhaps chronologically, and no other country but Spain experienced the history of enlightened Moorish culture followed by the 700-year reconquista--the attempt by Christians to retake the Moorish lands.

    Was this review helpful?

  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Mezquita Mayor de Granada

    by MM212 Updated Sep 29, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    After an absence of over 500 years, a mosque opened its doors in Granada in the summer of 2003. While many dubbed it as the Moslem reconquest of Andalucía, others saw it as a testament to the return of exemplary tolerance for which Granada and Al-Andalus were most known, prior to the Christian Reconquest. Needless to say, the opening of la Mezquita Mayor de Granada was controversial and marked an historic moment, but it was a result of nothing other than changing demographics and a growing immigrant population, mainly from North Africa. The mosque occupies beautiful grounds near el Mirador de San Nicolás atop a hill in Albaicín and was built in the typical whitewashed, red-tiled style of the neighbourhood.

    This one is a real minaret!
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • vibi68's Profile Photo

    Walk through the Mystery...

    by vibi68 Updated Sep 16, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Located on the right side of the Darro river, the Albaycin known as the primitive city of Elvira later renamed Granada by Ziris. It is a unique place to visit in the south of Europe as it was once the home of artists working on the Alhambra. With every turn, behind every wall, up every staircase ...one never know what to expect: miradors, placetas, convents, patios and so many more Moorish and Andalucian architectural beauties to view... this is the Albaycin. Classified World Heritage in 1984 by the UNESCO, it is very hard to reach by car as 95% of it is closed and impossible for motorised vehicules. In some places one can spread his arms across the street to touch both sides of buildings. The mystery of the Albaycin is only equaled by the romaticism of its paved streets, whitewashed walls, flowered patios, wood shutters and secret corners... another of Granada's "must visit" to lose oneself in time. For the tired feet, the Alhambra bus connection (32) goes through the Albaycin, it will take you from PLaza Nueva around the Albaycin for a 15 minutes ride stopping at the Mirador San Nicolas if you want a stricking view of the Alhambra; try at night for an even more magical effect.

    View of the lower Albaycin towards Plaza Nueva
    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Carmela71's Profile Photo

    Albaicin

    by Carmela71 Updated Feb 27, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Back to the Plaza Mayor we can walk along the river Darro until we arrive to the paseo de los tristes, all our left side is the albaicin.

    Try some of the Miradores of this neighbourhood, specially San Nicolas


    Now we can turn left to visit the albaicin and its miradores, getting lost on the little streets and watching the carmenes or go ahead to visit the Sacromonte caves. But first lets do some shots of the Alhambra from the next tip

    Views of the Albaicin

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Granada

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

25 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Albaicin
4.0 out of 5 stars
3 Reviews
0 miles away
Show Prices
Show Prices
4.5 out of 5 stars
2 Reviews
0 miles away
Show Prices

View all Granada hotels