Alhambra - Alcazar, Granada

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Calle Real s/n + 34 958 227 525

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  • Alhambra - Alcazar
    by draguza
  • THE PATIO OF THE LIONS..A COOL DRINK OF COLD WATER
    THE PATIO OF THE LIONS..A COOL DRINK OF...
    by DennyP
  • THE PALACE GARDENS   A WONDERFUL PLACE TO COOL OFF
    THE PALACE GARDENS A WONDERFUL PLACE...
    by DennyP
  • Bwana_Brown's Profile Photo

    The most visible part of Alhambra from downtown

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Mar 12, 2009

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    View of the Alcazaba towers from our hostal patio
    2 more images

    As the time for our tour drew near, we and the other tourists waited in the 'Alcazaba' portion of the Alhambra, with its name derived from the Moorish word for a citadel (al-Quasbah). This plateau above Granada has always been a natural defensive position, with various fortifications having been built there since pre-Roman times. This latest version was built by the Moorish Nasrid rulers in about 1232 as the anchor for the remainder of their amazing structures of the Alhambra - and it did its job for 260 years until the end of Moorish rule in Spain in 1492 (the same year Columbus 'discovered' America). This view of the Torre de la Vela, as seen from our hostal, is a constant reminder to Granada visitors that the Alhambra looms above the city.

    Our tight morning schedule did not allow us the time to really have a good look at the somewhat down-trodden walls of the Alcazaba or climb its towers, but even standing in its lower levels we had great views out over Granada from this commanding position. The second photo looks down on the old Moorish quarter of the city known as the Albaicin (and its eastern defensive wall snaking across the hillside), an area of the city we explored on foot later in the day. Separate tours of this part of the Alhambra are available but we were just waiting for the doors to the Casas Reales to open for our official tour to start.

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Fortress

    by Dabs Updated May 22, 2006

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    Alcazaba
    1 more image

    After visiting the gardens and palace at Generalife, we headed over to the other part of the Alhambra where you will find the rest of the sights you'll want to visit-the Palacio de Carlos V, the Nasrid Palace and the Alcazaba.

    The ticket to the Alhambra has three tear off tickets, one for Generalife, one for the Nasrid Palace and one for the Alcazaba, the fortress built in the 9th century. You'll want to climb the Torre de la Vela (watchtower) for the spectacular view of the town below and the snow capped Sierra Nevada Mountains in the distance as well as Generalife.

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  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    Climbing the Tower at the Alcazar

    by easyoar Updated Dec 24, 2004

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    View from the Tower in the Alcazar

    The best reason to go into the Alcazar is to climb the Tower as it gives very good views, and aslo gives you a better idea of the site of this Castle. There are normally around three flags flying on top of the Tower. From memory they are the Spanish flag, the Andalusian Flag and the flag for Granada.

    This picture shows the view from the top of the tower. There are also very good views across into Granada Town too. although these are not shown here.

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  • Ekaterinburg's Profile Photo

    The Alcazaba

    by Ekaterinburg Updated Jul 3, 2007

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    Exterior of the Alcazaba

    You will probably enter the Alhambra through the Puerta de la Justicia ( main gate). A short uphill stroll from here is the Puerto del Vino and then you're on the Plaza de Los Aljibes with the Alcazaba on one side and the Palace of Carlos V on the other. As you can only enter the Nasrid Palaces at the time stated on your ticket, chances are you will have some time on your hands and a perfect opportunity to spend time in the Alcazaba. This earliest part of the complex is obviously defensive and is basically a plain and sturdy fortress.You can walk around freely inside, admiring the towers and ramparts as you make your way up towards Torre de la Vela at the very top. This climb will reward you with a panoramic vista over the countryside. The central area of the Alcazaba is the site of the original barracks and small boundry walls indicate the remains of the different rooms, baths and even the dungeon. This building is not in any way spectacular but it's not so crowded and feels much more relaxed than other parts of the Alhambra. It's quite a good way to warm up for the rest of the experience.

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  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    The Alcazar at the Alhambra

    by easyoar Updated Dec 24, 2004

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    The Alcazar at the Alhambra

    When you enter the Alhambra, your ticket will take you into to thre separate parts of the Alhambra. The Palace area is the bit everybody wants to see. The Generalife gardens are also very impressive. That leaves the Alcazar (meaning Castle in Spanish). This Alcazar is ruined, and is not really that exciting. Indeed a lot of guidebooks don't even seem to cover it. There seem to be a lot of foundations and a big tower that has seen better days. The attached picture shows this area for completeness sake.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Alhambra - Alcazar - Patio de los Leones

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated May 13, 2006

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    Granada - Alhambra - Alcasar - Patio de los Leones

    The lion's court yard (Patio de los Leones) is a masterpiece of moorish style of architecture. Lion's court yard is the former center of sultan's rooms of rest. It is decorated with 124 columns similar to palm trees. Twelve lions symbolize signs on the Zodiac.
    It causes admiration of the cosiness and a graceful ornament. The fountain with lions certainly appeared later. The interdiction of islam on the image of people and animals is known. Therefore mixture of styles certainly takes place.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Alhambra - Alcazar - Abenserrah Hall

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written May 12, 2006

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    Granada - Alhambra - Alcazar - Abenserrah Hall

    There are Abenserrah Hall and the Royal Hall which come into a lion's court yard. Abenserrah Hall has such a name according to a legend. The emir has decapitated 100 Abenserrah brothers here in a punishment one of them has fallen in love in a concubine of emir.

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  • Hosell's Profile Photo

    Alcazaba

    by Hosell Updated Sep 9, 2004

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    The Alcazaba - a fortified stronghold guarding royal quarters built around two exquisite courtyards. This impressive military fortification goes back to 9th century, and was modified by Muhammad III in 13th century to be his private residence. There are various towers, some with elaborate interiors. From the tower, Torre de la Vela, there is a great view over the town.

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  • Hosell's Profile Photo

    Torre de la Vela.

    by Hosell Updated Sep 9, 2004

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    This is the tallest tower in the Alcazaba.To go up,you must to use a interior narrow stairs and it is always crowded of tourists.From here you can see some awesome views of the city and also of Sierra Nevada.

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  • Carmela71's Profile Photo

    Alcazar

    by Carmela71 Updated Feb 28, 2004

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    Normally we all leave till the end, and compared to the palaces that we have already seen, it is not as exciting, but it had its importance for the castle as it was the military area.

    Some fo the palces to visit are:

    Torre del Cubo
    Plaza de Armas
    Torre de la Vela
    Y el Jardín de los Adarves

    The views from the towers are incredible, check tourist traps

    If you have time you can still walk along the shops and the gardens before heading to Granada city center

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Alhambra - Alcazaba

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written May 13, 2006

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    Granada - Alhambra - Alcazaba

    The Citadel (Alcazaba) is the unique construction of military purpose in the whole ensemble. It is dated XIII century. There was soldier's barracks earlier from which almost nothing was kept till now.

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  • aaaarrgh's Profile Photo

    Puerta de la Justicia

    by aaaarrgh Updated Nov 27, 2005

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    holds the key

    Granada's 'Gate of Justice' is one of the main entrances/exits you take to get through the Alhambra walls. It is also the biggest gate, very imposing in its typical red stone. It leads you to the area in front of the Alcazar castle.

    I had to look very closely to spot a hand carved above the large arch and a key above the smaller arch. These are actually Islamic symbols, but the rumour was that the Alhambra would only be captured when the hand reached down to grab the key.

    Well, belive it or not that must have been what happened, because Granada was captured by Spain's Catholic monarchs in 1492!!

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  • jackfruit's Profile Photo

    Alcazar

    by jackfruit Updated Mar 7, 2004

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    Alcazar (Alcazaba)  ramparts

    Although in ruins today, this fort once offered protection for the thousands of moors that lived within it's walls.

    There are wonderful views out to the city of Granada, the Albaycin area and the Sierra Nevada mountains from the Alcazar.

    I would recommend spending an hour or so walking around this area - it's steep in some sections but well worth the calories spent!

    For more pictures, see my travelogue.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Alhambra - Mexuar Hall

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written May 13, 2006

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    Granada - Alhambra - Mexuar Hall

    Mexuar Hall of the Palace has been intended for the decision of legal issues. With arrival of Christians this room has undergone to especially serious changes. Per 1629 this hall was transformed into a chapel.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Alhambra - Hall of Ambassadors

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written May 13, 2006

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    Granada - Alhambra - Hall of Ambassadors - Ceiling

    There is a magnificent Hall of Ambassadors in Comares Tower. The well-known cedar ceiling is bordered by a stalactite frieze. The ceiling consists of three narrowed inclined planes completed by a small dome. The arrangement of a pattern corresponds to seven heavenly spheres of islam.

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