Alhambra - Carlos V Palace, Granada

4 out of 5 stars 41 Reviews

Calle Real s/n 902 441 221

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  • Alhambra - Granada
    Alhambra - Granada
    by solopes
  • Alhambra - Carlos V Palace
    by TooTallFinn24
  • Carlos V Palace: Circular Patio
    Carlos V Palace: Circular Patio
    by TooTallFinn24
  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    The Alhambra, Carlos V "palace" out of place....

    by Martin_S. Written Sep 16, 2008

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    Carlos V palace at Alhambra, Granada, Spain
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    After the Moslem conquerers were themselves thrown out of Spain, the Spanish ruler Carlos V, decided to build a palace within the confines of the Alhambra....boy is it every out of place here in these fantastic buildings. In itself it is also a nicely built and elegant building, but it is NOT, or rather should not have been built HERE....it is truly out of place. The idea of having a square building with a round central opening may have been original and the interior wood ceilings are nice also, but it is NO COMPARISON to the Alhambra.

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    Palacio de Carlos V

    by lina112 Updated Feb 29, 2008

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    Palacio de Carlos V
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    Charles V ordered to build the palace as an imperial residence and its location in the Alhambra was due to two reasons: after the Christian conquest of Granada, the Alhambra places complex became crown property and the Alhambra was also a symbol of royal power. Is one of the most significant examples of the Italian Renaissance outside Italy.

    Carlos V lo ordenó construir como residencia imperial y su localización en la Alhambra es por dos motivos: después de las conquista de Granada por parte de los cristianos, la Alhambra pasó a ser propiedad de la corona y la segunda que era un simbolo para la monarquía. Es uno de los mas importantes ejemplos del renacimiento italiano fuera de Italia.

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    The Palace of Carlos V

    by Ekaterinburg Written Jul 3, 2007

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    Part of the circular courtyard in Palace Carlos V

    This is definitely the cuckoo in the nest of the Alhambra and if you haven't done your homework prior to arriving, you will feel really confused by the prescence of this vast quadrangular Renaissance palace where you were expecting delicate plasterwork and Moorish arches. It is a seriously impressive building though with the major surprise of a pefect circular courtyard hidden in the middle of all this boxy squareness. The courtyard is 30m in diameter and is seperated from the inner arcade by doric colums on the lower level and ionic on the upper section. It immediately reminded me of the Collosseum in Rome and I was not at all surprised to learn that bull fights once took place here. There are two museums housed in this building: the Museo de L'Alhambra on the ground floor and the Museo de Bellas Artes on the upper floor. Entry to both these museums is free to holders of EU passports but I think the prospect of adding museum visits to the already mammoth task of seeing the Alhambra, is an option that many people would be happy to pass up.

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    charles V palace

    by doug48 Updated Jun 17, 2007

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    charles V palace

    this renaissance palace was built by king charles V . the palace was designed by pedro machuca in 1526. charles himself directed the work on the palace until his death in 1550. work on the palace stopped in 1568 due to the rebellion at the moriscos. the walls of the palace were not completed until 1923. even today the palace is not completely finished. this palace is so architectually out place in the alhambra one assumes it was built to insult the defeated moors. the alhambra museum is located in the charles V palace.

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  • barbskie's Profile Photo

    Gorgeous Architecture!

    by barbskie Updated Apr 11, 2007

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    One of the first huge building you see upon entering the Alhambra grounds. This the emperor's project for the city of Granada. The construction shows the king's awareness of the beauty of the Arab palaces and his interest in preserving them for posterity. The construction was started in 1533, but was abandoned years later, as the king had lost interest. At the end of the 20th century, the building's roofing was put in place and the museums were fitted out inside, the Fine Arts Museum on the top floor and the Alhambra Museum on the ground floor. The palace represents the introduction of Italian classicism in Spanish civil architecture. Designed by Pedro Machuca, the concept of the project is extremely original, above all due to the addition of the round courtyard in the external square block and the harmonious distribution of the strengths. The facades are imposing and the main one, on the west face, is the most adorned and rich.

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    Palacio Carlos V

    by MM212 Updated Oct 6, 2006

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    Palacio Carlos V
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    The Renaissance-style Palacio Carlos V was completed in the middle of the 16th century by Italian-influenced architects. Emperor Carlos V had been so enchanted by Granada that he decided to implant a residential palace in the heart of Alhambra. While the architectural style is somewhat of a contrast to the surrounding Moorish architecture, el Palacio itself is a wonderful example of Spanish Renaissance architecture. Most striking is the circular colonnade in the central courtyard. Unfortunately, part of the Nasrid Palacio de Comares was destroyed in order to make room for its construction. Today, Palacio Carlos V contains two museums, one exhibiting items from the Nasrid period, and the other showing religious art from the post-Reconquest period.

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    Renaissance Palace

    by Dabs Written May 21, 2006

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    Palacio de Carlos V
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    This was the only disappointing part of the Alhambra complex, it's out of place with the mystical Moorish design of the Nasrid Palace and Generalife and there really wasn't anything inside to see.

    It was commissioned by Charles V (Carlos V), they started work on this Palace in 1527, funded by the taxes assessed on the converted Muslims (known as Moriscos) after the Catholic Reconquista. The Moriscos rebeled and the project was put on hold, it finally got a roof in the 20th century.

    Our visit here consisted of walking inside, looking at the circular courtyard on the interior and then having a seat to wait until it was time for the Nasrid Palace. The Museo de la Alhambra closed before we got there at 2:30 and although the guidebook lists a 2nd museum, the Museo de Bellas Artes, I didn't see it.

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  • hquittner's Profile Photo

    A Fine Palace

    by hquittner Written Mar 7, 2006

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    Renaissance doorway and treatment
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    The 16C Palace of Carlos V, much maligned because it looks "inappropriate", is actually a rusticated Renaissance masterpiece. (Compare it with the 15C Medici Palace in Florence).(1). The architect Pedro Machuca was a pupil in Florence of Michelangelo. (the elegant horse-hitching rings alone are impressive)(2).The rooms (3) house a fine Spanish Art museum but we were not allowed the time and so like almost everyone else, saw it not. The immense central court looks like a bull-ring(4) ( and may have been used as such). This is made more credible by the carved bull-heads in the between floors freize.(5)

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  • lilnation's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace

    by lilnation Written Jan 31, 2006
    Palace of Carlos V

    The Palace de Carlos V can be distinguished by its circular courtyard. The architect was a student of Michaelangelo in Rome. This is the only monument which does not feature typical Arabic architecture and design as most all the other monuments in Alhambra

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    Palacio de Carlos V

    by Hopkid Written Sep 2, 2005

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    Carlos V taxed the Muslim population of Granada to fund the construction of his palace in the 16th century. Designed by Pedro Machuca, an architect from Toledo who had studied under Michelangelo, the building began contruction in 1527 but was ceased in 1568 due to a rebellion by the Muslims to this taxation. As a result, the palace remains unfinished although it did finally get a roof in the early 20th century.

    The edifice from the exterior is huge with massive with large stone blocks used in the lower half of the construction and lots of large windows. While the building is square in shape, the visitor will be surprised to see a circular courtyard within. This arrangement is a Renaissance plan that symbolizes the unity of heaven and earth.

    Be sure to visit the Museo de la Alhambra which is housed on a portion of the first floor of the palace.

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  • Urzu's Profile Photo

    Carlos V Palace

    by Urzu Written May 10, 2005

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    Carlos V Palace

    Although this palace is inside the Alhambra, you might think that it actually doesn't have anything to do with the rest of it! Well yes, you are right, but if there is something I believe is that Catholic Christians like to mess up stuff that other people have built! In any case I don't want to say that it's ugly or anything, it's quite nice!

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    Charles V Palace

    by smschley Written Jan 17, 2005

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    The origin of Charles V Palace (Palacio de Carlos V) was the need for a place that would include all the comforts of the time for the Emperor and his family, as the palaces, which were their summer residence, did not cover their needs. The Emperor ordered the construction of the palace next to the Alhambra in order to enjoy its wonders, taxing the defeated Moors to pay for it

    The architect in charge of the works was Pedro Machuca, an experienced architect in love with the Renaissance and a pupil of Michelangelo. The works started in 1527 and were totally finished in 1957. The construction went through several stages, the lack of financing, resources, revolts, and Charles’ son Philip II who abandoned it to build his own palace stopped the works.. The building was sometimes neglected to such an extent that the ceilings collapsed. Part of the delay was that Charles’ son Philip II abandoned it to build his own palace.

    The palace is square and its main façade is 63 meters wide and 17 meters high. Its circular patio is unique and it is the most important building of Renaissance style in Spain. At one point in the history of the Alhambra, the court yard of the Palace of Charles V was used for the staging of bullfights Only the southern and western façades are completely decorated. The northern and southern sides are not because they are connected to the palaces of the Alhambra.

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  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    The Palace of Carlos V

    by easyoar Updated Nov 21, 2004

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    Courtyard of Carlos V's palace

    The Palace of Carlos V is inside the Alhambra complex, and you can enter with your ticket that you purchased for the Alhambra.

    It doesn't really fit in with the beauty of the Moorish built Alhambra, and I think most tourists don't bother to see inside. The central courtyard (shown here) was used for bullfighting once upon a time.

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  • Hosell's Profile Photo

    CARLOS V PALACE

    by Hosell Updated Sep 9, 2004

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    The Palace of Charles V, built in 1526 is reminiscent of Italian renaissance - its architect, Pedro Machuca, was a student of Michelangelo in Florence. Today there are several museums inside of this palace. The National Museum of Spanish-Moorish Art displays the famous seven jars of the Alhambra and works of glass-ceramics. The Museum of Arts mainly exhibits works of the Granadinian school from the 15th to 20th centuries.

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  • Hosell's Profile Photo

    Interior view of Carlos V Palace

    by Hosell Updated Sep 9, 2004

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    This is a picture taken inside Carlos V Palace.Part of the building has not roof as you can see on my picture and looks like a stadium or bullring.In here now you can see in other interior rooms some very interesting museums and expositions.

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