Capilla Real, Granada

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Capilla Real

    by Dabs Updated May 29, 2006

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    Royal Chapel
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    The Capilla Real, or Royal Chapel, was commissioned by Ferdinand and Isabella to be their final resting place as at the time they thought the reconquest of Granada would be their highest achievement although they are much better known, at least in the US, for their role in Christopher Columbus' discovery of the New World. It was finished in 1521, after they died, their bodies were moved here after the Chapel was finished. You can see their tombs, along with those of their daughter, Joanna the mad (Juana la Loca), Joanna's husband Phillip the Handsome (Felipe El Hermoso), and Ferdinand and Isabella's grandson, Miguel. The tombs of Ferdinand and Isabella are slightly lower than the others, reportedly because Phillip was the son of Holy Roman emperor Maxmillian.

    I don't have any pictures of the interior, I believe there was a no photograph policy inside. Or maybe I was just lazy ;-)

    There's a small museum at the end of the visit with Ferdinand's sword, Isabella's sceptre and crown and some artworks including a Botticelli.

    Entrance to the Royal Chapel is separate from the Cathedral, admission is 3E. Both the Cathedral and the Royal Chapel close midday from about 1:30-3:30 pm (4 pm in the summer).

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Capila Real - how to get there

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Apr 20, 2014

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    Granada - Capila Real
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    The Royal chapel (Capila Real) which was constructed earlier is also included in the complex of the Cathedral. An entrance into the chapel is from Gran Via de Colon. The chapel is constructed in the late Gothic style under the order of Ferdinand and Isabella after the capture of Granada.
    The Royal Chapel is open daily except: Good Friday, December 25 and January 1.
    Closed on 2nd January and 12th October in the morning.
    Autumn-Winter opening hours:
    Monday to Saturday: 10.15-13.30h and 15.30-18.30h.
    Sunday and public holidays: 11.00-13.30h and 15.30-18.30h.
    Spring-Summer opening hours:
    Monday to Saturday: 10.15-13.30h and 16.00-19.30h.
    Sunday and public holidays: 11.00-13.30h and 16.00-19.30h.
    Ticket: 4 €

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    Capila Real - SACRISTY-MUSEUM

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Apr 20, 2014

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    Capila Real - SACRISTY-MUSEUM
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    "Catholic kings" Ferdinand and Isabella, and also their daughter Huana the Mad and her husband Phillip are buried in Capila Real.
    Here it is possible to admire a thin groove golden fencings of XVI century and the museum of treasuries (sacristia). The crown of Isabella, the Ferdinand's sword are exhibits of the museum. Also it is possible to see the fine picturesque collection including works of medieval Spanish artists, and also Botticelli's and Memling's masterpieces.

    You can watch my 3 min 00 sec about Video Granada Cathedral and Royal Chapel part 1 out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

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  • Aitana's Profile Photo

    Royal Chapel

    by Aitana Written Nov 10, 2010

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    Iron-work grille
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    The conquest of Granada by the Catholic Monarchs in 1492 was the most important success in their reign. It meant the union of most of the territory of the Peninsula under the same rule after almost 800 years. That’s why they wanted to be buried in Granada. For that, they ordered the construction of the Royal Chapel, which would be their mausoleum. Also their daughter Juana I, her husband Felipe (Philip the Handsome) and the Monarchs’ oldest grandson, Infante Miguel, are buried in the Royal Chapel.

    The Royal Chapel is attached to the Cathedral. It was built in Gothic style. The iron-work grille that separates the royal mausoleum and the people’s place is all a masterpiece.

    The chapel has the shape of a Latin cross. The funerary monument of Isabel and Fernando, the Catholic Monarchs, was sculpted in Carrara marble by Domenico Fancelli. Beside is the monument of Juana and Felipe, sculpted by Bartolomé Ordóñez. The coffins are in a crypt which is acceded from the chapel. In the chapel also stands a magnificent altarpiece.

    After the chapel you will visit the museum, that contains the scepter and the crown of the Queen Isabel de Castilla, the sword of the King Fernando de Aragón, other personal belongings of the monarchs and their collection of paintings of Flemish artists.

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  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    Capilla Real - Royal Chapel

    by suvanki Updated May 20, 2007

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    The Renaissance Entrance to Capilla Real
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    It was traditional for monarchs and important citizens to make preparations for elaborate internments. The Catholic monarchs had built the church of St John of the Kings in Toledo as their intended resting place, but their conquest of Granada altered their plans. They built the Royal chapel to celebrate their victory and to give thanks to God for this. Isabel decreed that her final resting place would be Granada, and that her estate would fund the building.

    Built 1505 -1521 by master builders J G de Hontanon and Juan de Alava. The Renaissance door by Juan Garcia de Praves is the only exterior to be seen. It was personally ordered by Carlos V in 1526. The chapel is claimed to be 'one of the last and finest fruits of Gothic architecture in Spain'

    to be continued



    Open April - Oct 10.30 - 1300hrs , 1600 -1900 Mon - Sat.
    11.00 - 1300hrs, 1600 -1900 Sun

    Nov - March 10.30 -1300hrs, 15.30 -18.30 Mon - Sat
    1100 - 1300hrs, 15.30 -18.30 Sun.

    Closed Good Friday.
    Admission 3 Euros
    Photography Not Allowed.
    Booklets for sale at ticket office.
    Gift Shop.

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  • SallyM's Profile Photo

    Capilla Real

    by SallyM Written Oct 10, 2008

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    Detail of Royal Chapel

    The chapel contains the tombs of the Catholic Monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabella and their daughter Joanna the Mad and her husband Phillip the Fair.

    It is surprisingly light inside because of the white stone. The tombs are made of white marble, and each of the effigies has a lion at its feet.

    It is possible to go down to the crypt to see the lead caskets containing the actual remains, but I didn’t bother. There is also a small museum containing amongst other things Isabella’s crown and sceptre, and Ferdinand’s robes, as well as works of art from Isabella’s collection.

    Photography is not permitted inside.

    Admission €3.50

    Open 10.30-1.30 and 4.00-7.30, 11-1.30 and 4.00-7.30 on Sundays

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  • Hopkid's Profile Photo

    Capilla Real

    by Hopkid Written Sep 7, 2005

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    Spain's Catholic monarches, Fernando and Isabel, commissioned the design and construction of this building for their own mausoluem and was finished in 1521, several years after their deaths. Their bodies were buried at the Alhambra's Convento de San Francisco which is now the Parador de Granada. On the main floor of the chapel is a large marble effigy of the monarchs which lies next to another marble effigy of Juana (daughter of Fernando and Isabel) and her husband, Felipe, son of Holy Roman Emperor Maximillian. Visitors can take a short flight of stairs to a viewing area beneath the effgies to see the coffins of the monarchs, Juana and Felipe, and the eldest grandchild of the monarchs, Miguel. An interesting collection of items owned by the monarchs is in the sacristy on the way towards the exit. Items include Fernando's sword and Isabel's crown and scepter.

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  • Carmela71's Profile Photo

    Royal Chapel

    by Carmela71 Updated Feb 27, 2004

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    Royal Chapel

    At the back of the main entrance of the cathedral or at the main entrance of the complex from Gran Via, you can find the Royal Chapel.

    Here are buried the Catholic Kings, Isabel and Fernando, even if Isabel asked to be buried at La Alhambra.

    It is a mix of late baroque and new renacentism


    Lets have a look at the Palacio de la Madraza, and finally enter in the Zoco.

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  • BerniShand's Profile Photo

    THE CAPEL REAL

    by BerniShand Updated Nov 18, 2005

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    the entrance to the Chapel

    the Capel Real [Royal Chapel] was purpose built to hold the remains of Ferdinand and Isabella, though they both died before it was finished there coffins were moved here on its completion, the coffins of a grandson, Prince Michael, their daughter Juana [Juana the Mad] and her husband Phillipe [Phillip the Handsome] are also here

    as you enter the chaple you cannot miss the amazing metal grille which is adorned with figures of people, animals and plants, in the chapel proper are the marble tombs of the four monarchs, still in very good condition and beautifully carved, it is interesting that the tombs of Juana and Phillipe are larger and higher than those of Ferdinand and Isabella, as Juana is most famous for keeping her adored husband with her for a considerable amount of time after his death, and Ferdinand and Isabella are famous for unifying a large part of Spain and reclaiming Granada for the Christians this may seem a little strange, but then you realise that Joannas tomb was commissioned by her son Carlos V so no doubt he felt it would reflect better on him to come from such `elevated` parents

    there is a small museum attached to the chapel with artifacts of Ferdinand and Isabella and a collection of religeous paintings

    the Chapel costs 3 euro to visit, cameras are not allowed

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  • lina112's Profile Photo

    Capilla Real

    by lina112 Written Feb 28, 2008

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    Royal Chapel

    The Catholic Monarchs founded the Royal Chapel for their own tombs. Designs for the Royal Chapel began in 1504 and it was built between 1505 and 1521 by Enrique Egas. Situated next to the cathedral, it contains the tombs of the monarchs Isabel and Ferdinand and Juana and Felipe.

    Los mismos Reyes Católicos la mandaron construir como mausoleo. El diseño lo empezó Enrique Egas en 1504 y su construcción fue entre 1505 y 1517. A parte de los Reyes Católicos, también se encuentran los mausoleos de Juana la Loca y de Felipe el hermoso.

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  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo

    Capilla Real

    by call_me_rhia Updated Mar 16, 2008

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    Capilla Real

    The Capilla Real is the Royal Chapel which houses the remains of several Spanish Monarchs, in particular those of Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand, who had previously been buried in the church at the Alhambra.

    It was 1504 when the couple decided that Granada would be their final resting place, so they decided to have a Royal Chapel built for them. Construction works, in Gothic style, started immediately but Isabella died in 1516, a year before the Chapel was completed, and she was then buried at the Alhambra.

    In the chapel, beside their mortal remains, you can also find the bodies of their heirs, Joanna I and Philip I. Other Royal remains are those of Prince Michael and Empress Isabella with her children Ferdinand and John.

    Photography is not allowed in the Chapel, but noone is really watching... so be carweful and don't use flash.

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Capilla Real de Granada

    by MM212 Updated Mar 16, 2008

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    Gothic spires of Capilla Real in the background

    Capilla Real (Royal Chapel) lies adjacent to la Catedral de Granada. Both were designed by the same architect and built simulataneously at the beginning of the 16th century, though Capilla Real was completed first and is more typically Gothic in style. La Capilla Real is famous for containing the remains of doña Isabel (la Católica) and don Fernando, as well as exhibiting some masterpieces by famous artists and sculptors.

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  • hquittner's Profile Photo

    A Royal Tomb

    by hquittner Written Mar 11, 2006

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    The reja
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    The Capilla Real is worth a visit for several things. (Our bus tour was not even made aware of its existence).Apparently there is a prohibition against photography today. When we visited 20+ years ago that must not have been so as my pictures look unhurried and open. However, the light was obviously dim and this was early in my travels and I did not own a wide-angle lens with a wide aperature. For what it is worth I provide what I can of tranfers of weak originals. The first is(1) the wrought-iron rood screen (reja) considered the best in the world. Then the marble tombs of the 2 pairs of monarchs (their lead coffins are in the crypt beneath which can be visited)(2). The walls of the chapel are flamboyant Gothic and covered with all sorts of insignia. Beyond them is the High Altar and the retablo one of the finest early examples of the Burgundian school(3). In the N. transept is a great tryptich by Dirck Bouts (4). Apparently Isabella was a great lover of the art of Flanders and other contemporaries because the Sacristy contains several masterpieces, never seen elsewhere and pretty dirty, by such painters as van der Weyden, Memling,Bouts,Botticelli and some early Spanish Masters (eg Berraguete).There are also various regalia of the monarchs which would be a big thing elsewhere. Reproduced by others is the entrance door to the chapel made some time after the building itself. It is said to be Plateresque but looks like dull Baroque to me (5).

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  • arlequin_g's Profile Photo

    Capilla Real

    by arlequin_g Written Jul 27, 2003

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    In front of the cathedral this building is located. The entrance ticket is 2.5. You can see the graves of the Catholic Monarchs so the ones of Felipe el Hermoso and Juana la Loca. You'll see the sculptures but you have to go down some stairs to see the coffins. Go round the sculptures and you'll find the stairs. Appart from this there are some dresses and objects of that time. Outside the Chapel there are gipsy women, just ignore them.

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  • vibi68's Profile Photo

    The historical victory...

    by vibi68 Updated Mar 11, 2006

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    Royal coffins in the crypt of Capila Real
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    It was the catholics Kings, Fernando of Aragon and Isabel of Castilla, that had the "Capila Real" built for their futur sepulturas... for they adamantly wanted to be burried in Granada. The city represented their most glorious victory over the Muslims, with the end of the Morrish occupation in Spain in 1492. Enrique da Egas was hired to errect the Capila Real in between 1506 to 1521. In its transept are two double cenotaphes, representing Isabel and Fernando on one side and both their children Jeanne and Philippe on the other as all their bodies lie in coffins in a crypt below. The place feels heavy with historical memories and Spanish prayers. Ceremonial clothing, official crown and others belongings of Isabel, as well as other relics of the monarchy are on display in the sacristy which serves as a small museum. Beautiful indeed...

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