Catedral de la Annunciacion, Granada

54 Reviews

Plaza Pasiega s/n + 34 958 22 29 59

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  • Catedral de la Annunciacion
    by draguza
  • Catedral de la Annunciacion
    by stevemt
  • Catedral de la Annunciacion
    by stevemt
  • andal13's Profile Photo

    Golden Altar

    by andal13 Updated Jul 10, 2003

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    The Main Altar of Cathedral, made of gold, is a magnificent work of Renaissance.

    Unlike many other Spaniard churchs, pictures are allowed inside the Cathedral (except inside its Museum).

    El altar mayor de la Catedral, hecho de oro, es una magnífica obra del arte renacentista.

    A diferencia de otras iglesias españolas, las fotos están permitidas en la Catedral (excepto en su Museo).

    Golden Altar
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    La Catedral

    by lina112 Updated Feb 28, 2008

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    Its constrution began by gothic style in 1523 by Enrique Egas project, but he was relegated in 1528 by Diego de Siloé and he adapted the build to renacentist style became one of the most important cathedral of the Renaissance. The Cathedral was built on the site of the former Mosque and it was not completed until 1704, 180 years later.

    Opening Time: Monday to Saturday: morning 10.45-13.30 evening 16.00-20.00
    Sundays and bank holidays: 16.00-20.00

    Fee: 3.50 Euros. Childrens under 10 are free.

    Su construcción se inició en 1523 según el proyecto gótico de Enrique Egas, pero al hacerce cargo de las obras Diego de Siloé en 1528, éste adaptó la obra al gusto renacentista siendo una de las obras cumbres del renacimiento. La catedral se compone de cinco naves separadas por pilares con columnas clásicas y girola.

    Horarios: Lunes a sábado: 10.45h-13.30 16h-20h
    Domingos y festivos religiosos: 16h-20h

    Tarifas: General: 3,50 €. Gratuita: menores de 10 años

    The cathedral outside Inside The Cathedral The Columns
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    Granada Cathedral

    by stevemt Written Oct 22, 2011

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    An imposing building, but fairly light and airy inside.

    Multiple organs (seems to be the thing in Spanish churches,) and the normal multiple ornate chapels.

    As per normal there is some spectacular art work here.

    There was supposed to be no photography in here, but everyone else was taking photo's (many with flash - grrrrrrr) so why not.

    As I have said in previous tips, people need to learn to turn their flash's off. It will ruin being able to take photo's for everyone soon. Also people need to be able to read the obvious graphic signs that clearly indicate NO PHOTOGRAPHY.

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    Iglesia del Sagrario

    by MM212 Updated Sep 29, 2006

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    The existing Iglesia del Sagrario was built in 1704 replacing a previous church built in the 15th century. It lies adjacent to la Catedral de Granada and, like its neighbour, it occupies the site of the Moorish mosque, Mezquita Aljama, which was destroyed after the Reconquest. Although dwarfed by the more majestic cathedral next door, la Capilla Real nevertheless has a stunning interior, which has kept some of the original 15th century architecture. The church has an impressive Renaissance dome over a Greek cross plan.

    Iglesia del Sagrario Interior
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    THE CATHEDRAL

    by BerniShand Written Nov 18, 2005

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    Building of the Cathedral began in 1523 on the orders of Queen Isabella no doubt to show the world that her conquest of Granada was complete, it is a truly impressive building designed to be Gothic but changed 5 years later into Renassance style
    Im afraid that Isabella didnt really get to enjoy her Cathedral as building wasnt completed and consecrated untill the beginning of the 18th century

    Inside the Cathedral is amazingly light and airy, the light reflects off the white walls and columns, the two 18th century organs are stupendous and for us were the main focal point of the Cathedral, as the famous Capilla Mayor is undergoing restoration and was covered in plastic sheeting, there are several interesting and beautiful side chapels, some of which would benefit from a thorough dusting, no doubt due to the ongoing restoration work, we noticed that several areas had been re-gilded obviouslt there is a major face lift underway here

    the small museum was interesting but incomprehensible if you dont have an audio guide as the labelling is totally inadequate

    entrance fee is 3 euro, photography is permitted in the Cathedral but not in the museum

    one of the fabulous organs the white pillars reflect the light you can see the work is in progress
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  • andal13's Profile Photo

    Cathedral

    by andal13 Updated Jul 10, 2003

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    Granada's Cathedral is a magnificent building of 16th and 17th centuries. The golden main altar is absolutely beautiful. (See next tip)

    La Catedral de Granada es un magnífico edificio de los siglos XVI y XVII. El altar principal, hecho en oro, es absolutamente impactante. (Ver el próximo tip).

    Cathedral (Granada)
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    Granada's Cathedral

    by Martin_S. Updated Jul 14, 2008

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    Granada's Cathedral is not a very obvious structure. When you arrive at its front portal, located on Plaza Pasiegas you will be surprised how hemmed in it seems. It seems as if they were trying to make it fade into the adjoining buildings. Same from the rear entrance on one of the main streets in Granada, just a small iron gate and you cannot see the Cathedral at all.
    It only seems to come into perspective when you climb up to the Alhambra, from there you can see the size and scope of the Cathedral.

    Cathedral main entrance, Granada, Spain Cathedral main entrance, Granada, Spain Cathedral detail, Granada, Spain Cathedral rear entrance, Granada, Spain Cathedral from Alhambra, Granada, Spain
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    Granadas Cathedral

    by barbskie Updated Mar 24, 2007

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    The Cathedral of the Annunciation) is a cathedral in Granada, in the Autonomous Region of Andalusia, Spain, designed at the peak of the Spanish Renaissance. In 1529 Diego de Siloé outlined the Renaissance lines of this building upon its Gothic foundations, with a triforium and five naves instead of the usual three. Within its structure it combines other orders of architecture. It took 181 years fo the cathedral to be built.
    In 1667 Alonso Cano altered the initial plan for the main façade, introducing Baroque elements. The magnificance of the building would be even greater, if the two large 81 meter towers forseen in the plans had been built; however the project remained incomplete for various reasons, among them, financial.
    We hadn't enough time to hop off so we were not able to to visit the interior part of this town's popular landmark. I guess there is a reason for a next visit. Hopefully soon.

    The entrance The rowers of the Royal chapel outside view

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    Granada's Cathedral

    by Hopkid Written Sep 7, 2005

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    The cathedral in Granada is really a grand affair. From the outside you can get a good idea of its immensity by going to the south side which is the main facade, designed by Alberto Cano in the 17th century, on Plaza de las Pasiegas. There is another impressive facade with wonderful stone carvings of biblical figures on the west side at the Puerta del Perdon. Inside there are great paintings and carvings and an impressive altar. The interesting point about this cathedral is that a lot of light has been allowed to filter in, giving it an airy feel unlike the dark and stark impression one gets at the much larger cathedral in Sevilla. Be sure to check out the musuem in the back of the edifice.

    I would highly recommend getting the audio guide. I did not and really wish I had. I believe it cost 3 euros.

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    Juan Latino and 400 year old Graffitti!

    by suvanki Updated Mar 16, 2008

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    While admiring the outside of the Cathedral, either for its' vastness (try squeezing it all onto a photo!) or its' decorative architecture, You might miss this example of ancient graffitti!

    It's 400 years old and was painted in honour of Juan Latino - the first Black Professor in Europe and the first known Black author of literature

    Born in 1516, possibly in Ethiopia, he came to Cordoba aged 12 with his slave mother, who served the daughter of the eminant General Gonzalo Fernandez. Aged 14 he moved to Granada, where he attended the Duke of Sessa.

    One of his duties was to carry this Latin scholars books. Later he took lessons with him. Juan showed an exceptional talent in Latin - hence his nickname, and he studied at the Catholic school, then the new University of Granada.

    Juan soon became known as an expert in latin - he was now teaching his master!, and as a talented musician and poet.

    He was also famed for his wit and graceful manners. Plays were written about him (Lope de Vega and La Famosa Comedia de Juan Latino) and Cervantes even mocked him in one of the prefacing poems of Don Quioxte.

    He gained his BA in 1546 and 10 years later his MA, when he became professor of Grammar.

    His students celebrated his achievement by writing these slogans and messages on the walls of the Cathedral. They used a mix of red clay, pepper, olive oil and bulls blood, to make their writing material. Probably a bit more environmentally friendly than aerosol paint spray!!

    In 1565 he was bestowed the prestigious honour of giving the opening exercise of the Academic year in Latin.

    Juan Latino was well regarded and respected, which is an achievement in a country that at the time was undergoing religious fanaticism and nationalist fervour.

    He had also fallen in love with Dona Ana, the daughter of the Dukes Estate manager - they wed and had 4 children

    I think this graffitti was on the wall to the right of the main facade on Plaza de las Pasiegas. I was too engrossed in the story of Juan Latino to take much notice.

    400 Year old Graffitti, Granada Cathedral
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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Catedral de Granada

    by MM212 Updated Oct 17, 2006

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    La Catedral de Granada was built in the early 16th century to rival Moorish achievements in the city and to re-impose Christianity after eight centuries of Moslem rule. This grand Renaissance Gothic cathedral is richly decorated and deliberately designed to resemble a triumphal arch, commemorating the triumph of the Catholics over the Moors. Not surprisingly, it was built on the site of a Moorish mosque, Mezquita Aljama.

    Catedral de Granada The Nave The Interior
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  • lina112's Profile Photo

    El museo

    by lina112 Written Feb 28, 2008

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    The Cathedral museum is located in the chapel and the sacristy halls of the Cathedral. Here you can you can find religious paintings, sculptures and manuscripts most of them donated by empress Elisabeth and Charles V

    Los fondos del museo lo constituyen fundamentalmente el legado de los Reyes Católicos y otros del Emperador Carlos V y la Emperatriz Isabel, siendo objetos de muy diversa naturaleza: joyas, reliquias, ornamentos, libros, tapices y pinturas.

    museo
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    Cathedral

    by Beach_dog Updated Feb 19, 2003

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    Built on the site of a former Mosque, the cathedral took an incredibly long time it took to build. Work on the cathedral began on 15th March 1523 and it was not completed until 1704, 180 years later. Building stopped during the plague.

    To the side of the Cathedral you will find the Capila Real (the Royal Chapel), built between 1505 and 1521. It houses the graves of both Queen Isabel and King Fernando. Buried alongside them are King Felipe (known as Felipe the Good Looking) and Queen Juana (known more commonly as Juana la Loca - Juana the Mad). Future Kings and queens of Spain were buried at El Escorial, near Madrid. The tombs were carved out of marble by the Tuscan sculptor Domenico Fancelli.

    Price €2.50

    Opening times:

    Mornings (all year) 10:00 to 13:30
    Afternoons (July and August) 16:00 to 20:00
    Afternoons (rest of the year) 16:00 to 19:00

    Granada Cathedral

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    Entrance of Cathedral

    by Beach_dog Updated Feb 19, 2003

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    Another cathedral view. When in the area of the cathedral you will often be approached by Gypsy fortune tellers. They give you a sprig of Rosemary, if you accept they tell you your fortune, unless you speak Spanish you wont understand a word, then they expect you to hand them some money. The best approach is to refuse the Rosemary or drop it on the floor, or just tell them you are not interested. They will normally leave you alone after that.

    Granada Cathedral

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    Puerta del Perdón

    by MM212 Updated Sep 30, 2006

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    Puerta del Perdón is one of several gates into la Catedral de Granada, but is the most impressive architecturally. It was designed in Lombardy, which explains the obvious Italian style, and completed in the late 16th century. The gate resembles a Roman triumphal arch, eluding to the victory of the Catholics over the Moors.

    Puerta del Perd��n
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