Fun things to do in Jerez de la Frontera

  • Flamenco Show 1
    Flamenco Show 1
    by unaS
  • Sherrry Barrels at the Bodega
    Sherrry Barrels at the Bodega
    by lomi
  • Domecq palace - Jerez de la Frontera
    Domecq palace - Jerez de la Frontera
    by solopes

Most Viewed Things to Do in Jerez de la Frontera

  • hawkhead's Profile Photo

    The Zoo

    by hawkhead Updated Jan 18, 2015

    What a pleasant surprise! We spent a lovely three hours here, wandering through what was originally a botanical garden and now has the zoo interspersed amongst the greenery. There are over 200 species of animals and over that of botanical specimens. Everything is well labelled, with just enough info. The animals are well-cared for, in spacious accommodation both for play and sleeping, and are healthy. The first thing one sees upon entering is a large pond, full of very noisy flamingoes. Peacocks wander freely and there are lots of free-flying storks, either in the trees or on purpose-built poles. Everywhere is very clean and tidy.

    The snack bar serves a limited choice - hot dogs and filled rolls with various fillings, and a good choice of hot and cold drinks. The little shop to the right of the entrance has a good selection, mostly aimed at children, and the prices are not outrageous.

    We were particularly impressed with the emphasis on the programme of protection and breeding of rare and endangered species.

    An excellent day out for young and old alike. There is face-painting! We didn't go on the zootren but it was very popular and would be a good way to either get one's bearings or else for those of less mobility to see the zoo.

    Loos are to the left of the entrance and at the snack bar area - very clean.

    Entry: €9 - adults
    €6.20 children under 14, 65+ not resident in province of Cadiz
    Free - under 2 years, 65+ resident in province of Cadiz

    Zootren: €2 per person

    Open 10.00-18.00 most days

    There is a birthday party area, by arrangement - €4.80 per participant.

    There is parking but cannot comment as we walked there. The number 18 bus would let you off at the corner of Madreselva and Taxdirt.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Zoo
    • Seniors

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    El Museo del Belen

    by hawkhead Updated Jan 5, 2015

    The Nativity Scene Museum is the biggest one in Spain and one of the few of this kind of museum in the world. It displays amazing Christmas artworks. The museum has developed a Nativity scene over 200 m2. The space is designed in a “U” shape, where the viewer can look at the representation of different scenes: Nativity, Virgin Mary’s Annunciation, Annunciation to the Shepherds, Town of Bethlehem, the Three Kings’ Caravan and the Flight into Egypt. This performance is made with special effects of lighting and narration (in Spanish), synchronized with the music; making the visit an original experience for the spectator.
    The museum comprises two levels, where you can observe the different dioramas created by many well known artists making Nativity scenes..
    To finish, you will admire the creation of a Neapolitan Nativity Scene over 70 m2 with figures of incalculable value.
    To my mind, a highlight of our visit to Jerez.

    €5 - adults
    €2 - pensioners/children

    Excellent toilets on the ground floor.

    Open: 10.00-14.00 and 18.00-20.00 every day, except holidays

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

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    Museo Aracheologico

    by hawkhead Updated Dec 28, 2014

    I hadn’t expected much and boy, was I in for a surprise. After various locations around the town, in 2012 the collection moved into a new and purpose-altered old house on the Plaza del Mercado. I was expecting something along the lines of a motley collection of dark and dusty cases containing random and ill-assorted and badly labelled artifacts. Instead, we were presented with a well-ordered, excellently lit and beautifully laid out collection over three floors, divided into three historical sections. Each section had an introductory film, in Spanish or English depending on the button one pushed. The labelling was all clear (in Spanish only) and well-thought out, with excellent diagrams and drawings and photographs. We had free audio guides in English, along with another explanatory leaflet and a floor plan. We were there for two hours and could have spent much longer. There was just the right balance of archaeological and historical information, giving one not only a concise overview but an in-depth understanding of the evolution of the region. Muy buen hecho!!

    The Archaeological Museum of Jerez

    The Archaeological Museum of Jerez is located in the San Mateo neighbourhood, in the heart of the ancient Hispano-Muslim Medina and one of the most historic sites in the city. It is located next to The Riquelme Palace and San Mateo Church. The museum traces its beginnings back to the middle of the 18th century when several archaeological pieces were collected by the Town Council, thus giving rise to the first archaeological collection in Andalucia. The museum has been housed, since 1993, in a group of buildings whose interior patios confer an air of complexity. The main building is an old mansion house, which dates from the end of the 18th century. Next to this stands the old Santo Domingo school, which currently acts as an exhibition space and conference hall. In 2005 building work commended to enlarge and improve the current facilities, terminating with the reopening of the museum in 2012.

    The permanent exhibition, completely renewed and updated with regards to display and lighting, is divided into three major thematic areas in which, by means of representative archaeological pieces and audio-visual support, interactive exhibits, scale models and recreations, a journey is undertaken through the history of the city and its surrounding area. The pieces which are exhibited in the museum come from local deposits, the second largest of Spain, which encompasses Jerez, the Guadalete River and some Neolithic, Phoenician and Roman deposits.

    The museum was inaugurated in 1873 in the Cabildo, which used to house the old City Council. The museum currently is located in an 18th century palace which has the typical structure of the Baroque palaces of Jerez. The facilities are distributed between three floors.

    In the courtyard are pieces of the pre-Roman, Roman and Visigoth periods. The first room is dedicated to the geography of Jerez and surroundings, the second to the Palaeolithic and Neolithic periods and the third is devoted to the Copper Age.

    The room number 4 is dedicated to the proto-history and rooms number 4, 5 and 6 exhibit artifacts of the Roman Empire. Also in the sixth room are located some pieces and information about the Visigoth period.

    The seventh room is dedicated to the numismatics and the eighth and ninth rooms are destined to the Muslim and medieval periods.

    Finally, the ninth room also has information and pieces of the 14th to 18th centuries.
    The museum has some important pieces such as the following: Greek Corinthian Helmet, unique in Spain which was found near the Charterhouse of Jerez; Belt's plaque engraved in the necropolis of Haza de la Torre, caliphate's bottle of the Muslim period; Roman portraits; coinages from 3rd century B.C to 19th century; and Spearheads and arrows of 2000 B.C.

    Opening hours:
    Tuesday to Friday: de 10.00 a 14.00 y de 16.00 a 19.00 h
    Closed: Mondays, 1 January, 6 January, Good Friday, 25 December.
    Slightly different hours in Summer and winter.
    Open on Saturdays and Sunday: 10.00-14.00.

    Prices:
    Adults: 5,00.- €
    Reduced: 1,80.- € (Pensioners (all OAPs) students, Jerez residents)
    Groups: 3,00.- €
    Combined entrance with Arachaeological Museum, Alcazar and Santo Domingo Cloisters:€9

    Free entry:
    First Sunday of each month
    28 de febrero (Día de Andalucía).
    18 de mayo (Día internacional de los Museos).
    24 de septiembre (Fiesta local).
    9 octubre (Fiesta local).
    23 de noviembre ( Aniversario de reapertura).
    6 de diciembre ( Día de la Constitución).
    Visitas en grupo/reserva grupos:
    Teléfono de contacto: 956.14.95.61
    Audioguides:
    Free audioguides available in English, French and German.
    Ramps available for wheelchair. Lifts. Toilets.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Archeology

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    Church and Cloisters of Santo Domingo

    by hawkhead Written Dec 16, 2014

    The Cloisters are open from 11.00-14.00

    The Church is open for Mass at 09.00, 12.00 and 20.00

    You can also visit the Church from 09.00-10.45

    Cloisters have been very nicely restored - it took 13 years!

    There are toilets to the right as one enters the Cloisters proper.

    Free entry.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    Andalusian Centre for Flamenco

    by hawkhead Written Dec 16, 2014

    Although the site says there is a video show and a museum, this is not the case. Neither is available now.

    If you are in the area, it is an interesting house to visit for a few minutes. Unless you have a specialised knowledge and interest in flamenco, it is not worth making a detour.

    Related to:
    • Music

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    Domecq's palace

    by solopes Written Aug 20, 2014

    Domecq is a word tightly linked to Jerez de la Frontera, for many decades related to wine and bullfights.
    This Baroque palace, built in the 18th century for the Marquis of Montana, was later acquired by Domecq family, and though being today property of a catering company, keeps being identified by the famous name of the intermediate owners.
    Located in the centre of town, with a statue of Pedro Domecq Núñez de Villavicencio, the first Marquis in Domecq family, who lived from 1869 to 1921 before it, it is now closed to the public.

    Domecq palace - Jerez de la Frontera
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

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  • Hammam Andalusì Arabian Bath

    by brucio2002 Written Jun 18, 2012

    I've been living here in Jerez for several months. In Jerez I found many things to do and to see. I particularly love the Hammam. At least once a week I go there to enjoy those baths. Three different temperatures: cold, warm and hot. Staying in the water is kind of being caressed by sweet hands. I can't really describe the sensation I feel when I go out and come back to real life. It's like I had been in an other world for an indefinable time. I always try relaxing massage. There are many services to choose: exfoliation, chocolate bath, Andalus bath. It's a must!
    Compared with other activities of this kind it is not expensive at all. They give you everything you need for the experience.

    Related to:
    • Women's Travel
    • Spa and Resort
    • Family Travel

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  • LIGHT AIRCRAFT'S FLIGHTS

    by bayflight Written May 24, 2012

    If you want to live an exciting and unique experience, enjoying of the incredible views of the strait of Gibraltar, Alcornocales' Natural Park, Doñana's National Park, sherry vineyards...you cannot lose the opportunity to fly over the province of Cadiz, the province who has a huge variety of beautiful landscapes that can be seen in a sight. Also Bay Flight offers you the chance to be an authentical pilot for a day, being yourself who decides what to see.

    Related to:
    • Luxury Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Sky Diving

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    Flamenco Show

    by unaS Updated Nov 28, 2010

    The El Laga' de Tio Parrilla is a professional restaurant with dancers, singers and musicians. I got a discount ticket from the hostel that included 2 free drinks - got both of them in one glass at the same time :)

    A very good show. I could swear that the dancer in red is the same one that I saw in Granada couple of nights ago, but here she was one of the two soloists and did a much better job. With the hostal ticket I also got a great seat, front and center.

    Taxi there and back Euro 5 each way. All told same cost as the for show in Granada, but here included 2 drinks. There of course the cost included the walking tour of Albycian - equals out nicely.

    Shows Monday - Saturday at 22.30 (10.30 PM).

    Flamenco Show 1 Flamenco Show 2 Star of show
    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Music
    • Singles

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  • Zoo Botanic

    by nataliewinkels Written May 1, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    www.zoobotanicojerez.com

    My husband and I had a great time visiting this small but interesting zoo. We went on a beautiful day in May which made the visit that much nicer. We also went on a school day, so although there were several school groups visiting, we were among one of only a few other patrons. I don't know if this zoo is typically busy or not, but we had the place all to ourselves. People who loves zoos, will likely love this one for the fact that the animal are in very observable habitats. The size is nice, so you could spend around 2-3 hours with out feeling rushed or too tired. There is a tourism parking lot on the hill, down from the entrance of the zoo, so for 1 euro you can park and walk to the entrance, which is very convenient. My favorite thing was feeding peanuts to the elephant. You can buy peanuts at the food vendors, or just pick up a few from the ground. I could have done this all afternoon! The worst part was the entrance fee, 9 euro for an adult ticket. So, if that isn't a factor, spend the money and go to the zoo!

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Zoo

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    Jerez Railway Station

    by ELear Updated Apr 29, 2010

    Jerez station is wonderful – especially the coloured tiles covering the walls along platform 1. It’s interesting to reflect that in spite of the enormous difference between this and, say, the ironwork of King’s Cross, in a way they embody very similar values and express similar “messages” - local pride, the symbolic value of the station, and the mutually beneficial relationship, as they saw it then, between art and technology. There’s a good cafeteria too, and they're very, very helpful iat the information desk.

    (It was here, when asking about trains to Seville, that I realized that many local Spanish trains don’t exist on the Deutsche Bahn website, which is the site The Man In Seat 61 suggests and I normally rely on for all continental train times. For full, up-to-date Spanish timetables you have to go the RENFE site - http://www.renfe.es/horarios/english/index.html)

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Trains
    • Historical Travel

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  • Hammam Andalusi (Arab Baths)

    by santaclara3 Updated Apr 7, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    An absolute treat and a must do while visiting Jez de la Frontera is a visit to Hammam Andalusi or arab baths, wonderfully relaxing on a hot day. 3 plunge baths varying in warm,hot and ice cold.This can be had on its own, or varying treatments available such as aloe vera full body exfoliation,clay bath or chocolate mask,massages, etc.And what excellent value compared with prices in Uk,Ireland France and other parts of Europe are extremely good.Open 7 days a week and sessions start at 10am and at 2 hour intervals til they close at 10pm.

    Related to:
    • Spa and Resort

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    Doñana National Park

    by lomi Updated Mar 6, 2010

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    The National Park is not in Jerez, but is a half hour bus journey away in Sañlucar.

    It used to be the hunting grounds for the Kings of Spain until General Franco's time. Fortunately he did hardly anything to it and it now belongs to the state. So it has remained one of the few untouched landscapes in Spain with wetlands, pine forests, beaches and dunes where wildlife can flourish.

    Doñana comprises delta waters which flood in winter and then drop in the spring leaving deposits of silt and raised sandbanks and islands. These conditions are perfect in winter for geese and ducks. In spring they attract hundreds of flocks of breeding birds. In the marshes and the cork-oak forests you've a chance of spotting grey herons, lanner falcons, ring and turtle doves, partridges, oxpeckers, cattle egret, storks and vultures. You may catch a glimpse of a Spanish Imperial Eagle, ( only 14 breeding pairs).

    The only way to view the park is by guided walks. The riverboat, Real Fernanando, leaves from Sañlucar twice a day in high season and once a day November to February. It tours the coast of the national park and makes several stops for everyone to get off and go on guided walks to select places that does not disturb the wildlife.

    You must book in advance. Imprescindible haver reserva. We got the hotel receptionist to do this on our behalf and she put the cost of the ferry trip on our hotel bill.

    Real Fernando
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • National/State Park
    • Birdwatching

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    If you don't want to walk...

    by unaS Updated Feb 8, 2010

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The tourist train starts from the Plaza Arenal, close to the Alcazar. It is parked across from the Colegio Publico just behind the statue of of Miguel De Cervantes.

    It has 4 different routes, at different hours.
    Starting at 10 am it leaves once an hour.
    Each hour it travels along a different route.
    Then begins again at 1800 hours repeating the 4 different routes that it travels in the morning.

    Runs every day except Sunday.

    The tourist train Plaza Arenal and statue of Miguel De Cervantes.
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Seniors

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    LA CARTUJA

    by lomi Written Dec 1, 2009

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    La Cartuja, is a monastery called also El Monasterio de Nuestra Señora de la Defension (The Monastery of Our Lady of Defense).

    It belongs to the Cartesian Order and no one can enter but everyone can see the exterior and garden, which is well worth the trip

    The monastery was founded by Don Alvaro Obertos de Valeto in 1453.

    He was a noble of Jerez and the construction started in 1478. The basic plan of the monastery was Gothic, but the construction took a long time, and is a mixture of styles.

    Timetables: 9.30-11.15am and 12.45-6.30pm. Closed: public holidays.
    Free admission.

    La Cartuja
    Related to:
    • Architecture

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Jerez de la Frontera Hotels

  • Tryp Jerez

    I was very pleased with my weekend stay here, as the Reception people were helpful, the ambience was...

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  • Casa Grande

    Great location - about mid point between the train station and the Plaza Arenal. A couple small...

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  • Hotel Palacio Garvey

    this hotel drips in luxury from the moment you enter it's glass fronted doors and access the main...

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