Alcazaba, Málaga

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  • Alcazaba
    by draguza
  • Panorama view of the castle
    Panorama view of the castle
    by BruceDunning
  • Close up view of the high walls
    Close up view of the high walls
    by BruceDunning
  • leics's Profile Photo

    The best bit...at least, for me....

    by leics Written Mar 6, 2014

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    Alcazaba entrance
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    Malaga's Alcazaba is simply super. It is actually the best-preserved (albeit restored and partially reconstructed) alcazaba in Spain, although it is nowhere near as vast as the Alhambra nor is it as beautifully detailed and decorated. But it's still an excellent introduction to the architecture of the rich at the height of Moorish Spain, most certainly worth its very reasonable entrance fee and absolutely a 'must-see' imo.

    In fact, it is the one sight for which I made a bee-line on my first daytrip to Malaga..a lovely sunny day, which made exploring particularly pleasant.

    The complex dates from the 1000s, when it was more of a defensive structure than a palace. It has two inner 'courtyard' areas and was originally joined with the encircling city defensive wall...some parts of this still remain. Over the centuries much rebuilding and extending was done, with the original defensive elements remaining but luxurious apartments added.

    There are a series of gates and rather lovely 'gardens'...all quite small but, with their central fountains, one can easily imagine the ruling classes (especially the women) enjoying the shady, breezy hilltop location during the summer heat. There are still excellent views out to sea and inland but, of course, in the heyday of the Alcazaba those views would have been so much more pleasant!

    The beautiful and complex stuccowork ...and probably the intricate wooden ceilings.... which you can still see in some of the palace rooms was much restored in the 1930s but, even if it isn't all original, it does give a valid impression of how beautiful this place once was.

    The Romans were in Malaga long before the Moors and much Roman stonework was re-used in the Alcazaba's construction and foundations of the Roman fort were used when it was first built.. As well as various column bases and pillars incorporated into the structure itself various Roman altars and other chunks of masonry are displayed alongside he path (I'd guess these chunks have been found during various more recent excavations in the city).

    Restoration is ongoing..as are excavations.... so you are unlikely to be able to access all of the Alcazaba complex but there is more than enough to occupy you for at least a couple of hours.

    Highly recommended.

    Open Tuesday to Sunday
    Summer: 9.30am to 8pm
    Winter: 8.30am to 7.30 pm
    Mondays 9.00am to 6.00 pm

    Entrance is 2.20 euro (as I recall) which is remarkably cheap. You can avoid the climb up the hill by taking a lift, which costs a bit extra and is accessed from Calle Guillen Sotelo.

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  • draguza's Profile Photo

    ALCAZABA

    by draguza Written Jul 2, 2013

    An old Arabic fortress that dominates the city from its vantage point on the hill above the bay, it has now become a symbol of the modern city and an important tourist attraction. Sultan Badis, ruler of the Moorish province of Granada was responsible for having it built. It was declared a national heritage site in 1931. Restoration work began the same year and was completed in 1947. It's well worth wandering around the site to see how even earlier Roman remains were incorporated into the Moorish building work, and there are attractive gardens where you can sit and rest

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Alcazaba Palace

    by BruceDunning Updated Nov 30, 2011

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    Panorama view of the castle
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    The meaning of the name in Arabic is citadel. It was built in 11th century by Moors, from what was a large Roman fort beforehand. The castle gradually climbs the hill for about 300 feet, and connects to Gibralfaro Fort above it. There is an archaeological museum inside and there is an outer and inner citadel, beside water theme, ponds, and gardens/flowers. Entry is through Christ's Door at the bottom level at Plaza de la Auana. The castle is patterned after the Alhambra of Granada, but not as big or ornate, however has less tourists. The castle is closed Mondays and other days open 9:30-6PM in winter and until 8PM in summer months.

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  • Regina1965's Profile Photo

    Alcazaba - fortress and palaces.

    by Regina1965 Updated Oct 23, 2009

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    One of the palaces - a lovely pond.
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    La Alcazaba is a part of Gibralfaro castle even though there is no walking from the inside from one castle to the other anymore, so you have to pay for the visit to both parts. La Alcazaba fortress was built on the ruins of a Roman fortress by the Moors in the 11th century and beside La Alcazaba are the ruins of a Roman Theatre. There used to be more than 100 towers on the fortress and 3 palaces.

    While visiting la Alcazaba I was struck be its resemblance to Alhambra in Granada and later read that it was inspired by Alhambra. La Alcazaba has got an Archaeological Museum (see my photo) with artefacts from Phoenician and Muslim finds. Walking along La Alcazaba is beautiful, it stands on a hill (Gibralfaro castle stands much higher though) so the view of Malaga is beautiful - and the palaces are ever so lovely, the gardens and all the stuff in it which is still intact. The gardens are beautiful and I particularly like the pond inside one of the palaces (see my first photo).

    An absolutely "must" visit while visiting Malaga. It is closed on Mondays like most of the musei and open from 9:30-20:00 in the summer time and 8:30-19:00 in the winter time.

    Admittance fee is 2 euros.

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Alcazaba

    by barryg23 Updated Oct 21, 2009

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    Courtyard in Alcazaba
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    The Alcazaba is a former palace dating from the 11th century when Malaga was under Moorish control. It's located in the centre of Malaga on the lower slopes of the hill upon which Castillo Gibralfaro - a Moorish castle - was later built.

    The entrance to the Alcazaba is just above street level. You pass through two angled gates before emerging into the lower precinct. The path continues on into the main part of the Alcazaba passing gardens, fountains and towers before you reach the palace. Inside the palace is a series of elegant courtyards and patios. There are good views over the city from a number of positions in the palace.

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  • The Alcazaba & Castillo de Gibralfaro

    by Scaramella Written Jun 2, 2008

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    The Alcazaba is an excellent example of Moorish architecture. If you want to see some culture in the region without spending to much money I would recommend this fortification instead of the Alhambra in Granada. Less tourists and much cheaper for almost the same inpression if you ask me.
    You can combine it with the Castillo de Gibralfaro (duoticket), where you have a stunning panorama of the city and it's harbour.

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  • Arabic Fortress

    by blint Written Mar 22, 2008

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    On one website it dared to proclaim that Malaga's Alcazaba was better than Granada's Alhambra. This is a complete falsity as it is nowhere near as complete or impressive as the Alhambra. On the other hand Malaga's 11th Century fortress and palace is beautiful and reminiscent of the tower's of the Alhambra.

    If you come to Malaga you must take a look at it and the Roman Amphitheatre below, even if you don't go in it to see the small archaeological museum.

    Entrance Fee – 1.90 €
    Opening Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; 7:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

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  • Alless's Profile Photo

    La Alcazaba - Fortress

    by Alless Written Sep 21, 2007

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    La Alcazaba is a major landmark of the city.It is made up of a double encircling wall and rectangular towers This fortress dates back to the 700s, although much of the structure belongs to the mid 11th century. The entrance is through the gateway known as the Puerta del Cristo (Christ's Door), where the first mass was celebrated following the Christian victory over the town.

    The fortress is one of the largest Muslim military buildings preserved in Spain. It formed part of the Arab Malaka defensive system and was linked to the town ramparts, which have now disappeared.
    If you visit inside the walls you can see nice views of city and admire landscapes and romantic gardens.

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  • lina112's Profile Photo

    La Alcazaba

    by lina112 Updated Aug 27, 2007

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    Some five minutes walk from the the Cathedral is Alcazaba, a 15th Century Moorish fort. The fort rambles across a hill which used to form part of the shore line, before the land that now forms the port was recaptured from the sea. Next to the fort is a 1st Century Roman theatre which is currently under restoration, the job being made all the more difficult because much of the theatre's masonry was used by the Moors in the construction of Alcazaba.

    Se encuentra en las faldas del monte Gibralfaro en cuya cumbre se halla el Castillo del mismo nombre. Alcazaba y Castillo están unidos por un pasillo de monte resguardado por dos murallas zigzagueantes o rampantes llamado La Coracha. La Alcazaba es una edificación nazarí construida sobre la roca y en la que destaca la armoniosa conjunción de las necesidades defensivas y la serena belleza de sus estancias y jardines interiores; como obra militar es la más importante musulmana conservada en España.

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  • Helga67's Profile Photo

    Alcazaba

    by Helga67 Updated May 31, 2007

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    Alcazaba

    Alcazaba is a fortress built in the 11th century by the Moors. It was built on the remains of a Roman fortress. It has an impressive double wall with a large number of defence towers and contains three palaces in Moorish style surrounded by beautiful gardens and fountains. Several terraces offer magnificent views of the town and harbour.

    Inside one of the palaces, there is an archaeological museum about Paleolithic and Neolithic antiquities and an exhibition about Muslim ceramics and pottery.

    It is undoubtedly a must-see attraction. Walking along the winding stone pathways and through the Moorish gates you will feel like being in another part of the world.

    Alcazaba is open daily (except on Mondays) from 9.30 am to 8 pm.
    Entrance fee: 1.80 EUR

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Patio de los Naranjos

    by MM212 Updated May 26, 2006

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    Patio de los Naranjos is a small enclosed terrace within Alcazaba planted with orange trees (as the name indicates). An important architectural feature of the patio is the set of ornate horseshoe arches overlooking the patio. When I visited Alcazaba in Feb 2005, a wedding was taking place and the newly weds being photographed right on the patio (see photos).

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    Alcazaba

    by MM212 Updated May 25, 2006

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    Alcazaba de Malaga
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    Alcazaba is perhaps the most important historic monument in Málaga. Perched on a hill by the Mediterranean waters, the fortress was first built in the 8th century, right after the arrival of the Arabs into the Iberian Peninsula, over ruins of Roman buildings. Materials from the Roman ruins were used to build Alcazaba and are still visible to this day, though much of the existing walls date from the 11th century when Alcazaba was reinforced. Visits are allowed of the beautiful gardens and terraces of Alcazaba, which offer fantastic views of the city. Inside Alcazaba, there is an archeological museums displaying Roman, Phoenician and other artefacts found in Málaga over the years.

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    Puerta de las Columnas

    by MM212 Updated May 25, 2006

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    The use of Roman ruins as building material for the Alcazaba is most evident in Puerta de las Columnas. The gate's name refers to the Roman columns used in its construction which are still visible today. This gate leads into the beautiful terraces and gardens of Alcazaba which offer great views of the city and its harbour.

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  • cbeaujean's Profile Photo

    alcazaba,moorish castle and amphitheatre

    by cbeaujean Updated May 8, 2006

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    amphitheater and alcazaba

    after pulling down all the houses built on it centuries after centuries,roman amphitheater recovers its office!

    11th century fort built at the foot of gibralfaro castle.

    adults:1,80 €

    open from 9.30am to 8pm (6pm in winter);monday closed.
    same opening hours for nearby "castillo de gibralfaro",entrance on "paseo de reding".

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    INSIDE THE ALCAZABA DE MALAGA

    by LoriPori Updated Feb 20, 2006

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    Patio de la Alberca ( Pool )
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    Inside the Palace, there are three consecutive courtyards. The first, the Patio de los Surtidores ( Jets of Water ) with a row of caliphal arches leading to the Torre de la Armadura Mudejar. with a sixteenth century carved wooden ceiling and the Torre de Maldonado, with lovely original marble columns and a splendid view of the city.
    The Nazari Palace is reached through a restored pavillion and contains the Patio de los Naranjos ( Orange Trees ) and the Patio de la Alberca ( Pool ). Behind it is the quarter of dwellings.
    The "Pool" reminded me of the Reflecting Pool at the Alhambra.

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