Cathedral, Málaga

4.5 out of 5 stars 29 Reviews

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  • Cathedral
    by draguza
  • Cathedral
    by alectrevor
  • Another view of the decorative facade
    Another view of the decorative facade
    by BruceDunning
  • leics's Profile Photo

    Rather lovely ceilings........

    by leics Written Mar 5, 2014

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    I'd visited the exterior of Malaga's cathedral.....Nuestra Señora de la Encarnación ...... on my December daytrip, but allowed myself time to properly explore its interior on my return visit.

    As cathedrals go it's quite a late structure, because Malaga belonged to the Moors until the early 1400s). Almost nevitably, it was built on the site of a mosque. Work started in 1528 and was 'finished' in 1782, although there have obviously been changes, restorations and removations since that time...and its second tower was never actually completed....hence its nickname 'La Manquita' which means 'one-armed lady'.

    I much prefer religious buildings which date from the earlier Medieval era than the Baroque but, nevertheless, I was rather taken with the twiddly ceilings of Malaga's cathedral. Each of the side-chapels has some sort of hugely ornate altarpiece, many gilded and all with dressed statues...it's worth visiting just to see those, although I found taking photos very difficult because of the light (the cathedral is dimly-lit but the side-chapels often have quite bright lighting).

    I found there was limited information in English, so if you are very keen on religious architecture and artefacts it might be a good idea to arm yourself with a good guidebook before your visit.

    I did not pay to enter although I have seen some sites advising that there is a fee of 5 euro which includes entrance to the museum (which I did not visit). You can be certain that at least one person will be sitting outside the entrance seeking alms.

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  • draguza's Profile Photo

    CATEDRAL

    by draguza Written Jul 2, 2013

    This 16th-century Renaissance cathedral in Málaga's center, built on the site of a great mosque, suffered damage during the Spanish Civil War. However, it remains vast and impressive, reflecting changing styles of interior architecture. Its most notable attributes are the richly ornamented choir stalls by Ortiz, Mena, and Michael. The cathedral has been declared a national monument.

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    Cathderal and Museum

    by BruceDunning Updated Nov 30, 2011

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    View of tower sticking above the tree line
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    The formal name is the Cathedral of Incarnation, and was consecrated in 1588, but construction took place over 250 years, all the way until 1782. It never got totally finished because only one tower got built per the original plans. The plan is Renaissance style with interior having a nave and two aisles. The facade is Baroque in design, with a tower about 250 feet high, and 276 steps. The nickname is La Manquita-or one arm lady because the other planned tower did not get constructed.
    Entry to the cathedral is 5Euro, which just does not seem right to charge to enter a holy place, but then everybody needs to make a buck, I guess, to survive. It keeps out the riff raff.

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  • Regina1965's Profile Photo

    The Cathedral - the most important monument.

    by Regina1965 Updated Oct 23, 2009

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    The Cathedral.
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    Oh, dear, now I feel ashamed, while adding this tips I now see on my ticket and leaflet that it is forbidden to take photos inside the Cathedral :( And I took many as did all the other tourists visiting).

    Anyhow, hmm, The Cathedral is called "Cathedral of the Incarnation" and is Malaga´s most important monument built on a site of a mosque. It was built between 1528-1782 and was consecrated 3rd of August 1588 and it lacks one tower, which never got finished due to lack of funds, so amongst locals it is called "The one-armed lady" in Spanish "La Manquita". As it took so long to build The Cathedral the building style is Renaissance and baroque.

    Next to The Cathedral and adjoining it is The Iglesia del Sagrano which is from the 15th century.

    Like all major Cathedrals this one just takes your breath away, and for us Protestants who are not used to our churches being decorative this is like stepping into another world.

    It is open from 9:30-18:45 and Saturdays from 9:30-18:00. Service only on Sundays.

    There is an open air museum in the garden in front of The Cathedral (free of charge).

    Entrance fee is 4 euros and remember not to drink or eat inside, wear respectable clothes and NO PHOTOS!

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    Malaga Cathedral

    by datapanik Updated Jul 29, 2008

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    Inside Malaga cathedral
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    The imposing but unfinished cathedral is worth visiting for its Renaissance interior, splendidly ornate religious iconography, carved 17th century choirstall and hushed ambience. The nominal entrance fee goes towards its upkeep.

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  • La Manquita

    by blint Written Mar 22, 2008

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    Malaga's cathedral was built between 1528 and 1782, typically, around the site of a mosque.

    The interior has a mix of Renaissance and baroque styles from the 17th and 18th centuries.

    It is nicknamed the Manquita which refers to the fact it was originally meant to have two towers but only one was completed. Manquita is roughly translated as One armed (feminine). It's official name is de la Incarnacion.

    Visiting hours: 10.00a.m.-12.45p.m. & 4.00p.m.-5.30p.m. Closed on Sundays. It costs a whopping 3.50 euros to enter.

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    Cathedral

    by Alless Written Sep 21, 2007

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    Malaga´s cathedral was built between 1528 and 1782 on or near the site of a former mosque. While original plans had allowed for two towers, lack of funds resulted in the completion of only one, giving rise to the name by which the cathedral is affectionately referred to, La Manquita , loosely interpreted as "one armed woman".

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    La Manquita

    by Helga67 Updated Jun 1, 2007

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    cathedral
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    The cathedral is called La Manquita (the one armed) because one tower was never finished due to lack of money.
    The cathedral was built over a period of two centuries on the site of an earlier mosque. This is why the building is such a potpourri of styles.

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  • lina112's Profile Photo

    Malaga Cathedral

    by lina112 Updated Nov 1, 2006

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    the cathedral

    The Cathedral has only one tower, building was halted on the second tower due to lack of money. Inside there are fine carvings of saints in the choir´srea, a gothic altar and a statue of the Virgin Mary, which was presented to the city by Ferdinand and Isabella (the King and Queen) after the city was re-captured from the Moors.

    La catedral solo tiene 1 torre porque cuando estaban construyendo la 2º faltó dinero y tuvieron que parar su construcción. Dentro hay varias tallas de santos en el area del coro, el altar gótico y la estatua de la virgen maría que fue presentada por los reyes católicos después de que la ciudad fuese reconquistada.

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  • IanMacPhail's Profile Photo

    Cathedral

    by IanMacPhail Written Jun 4, 2006

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    It`s nice to get out of the Malaga heat and a visit to the Cathedral is certainly worth the 3.50 euros entrance. The cathedral is certainly high roofed, you may injure your neck looking uo. There are 15 side chapels with some beautful art work. Some of the paintings take on a new life when you look at them from the other side of the building.
    The enclosed gardens are very nice and while in the garden you can take a visit to the adjoining Iglesia del Sagrario.

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  • AlexeRoy's Profile Photo

    Sta. Iglesia Catedral - Malaga: Superbe!

    by AlexeRoy Updated Mar 20, 2006

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    Left side finished
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    My first European cathedral. I was and still is out of words to describe what I felt outside and inside the cathedral! Can't explain you'll have to go there to see it and to feel it!
    Was built in the 1500 and took about 200 years to built. Have to architectural influence: Renaissane and a little of baroc. The right side is not complete...and will never be!

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    INSIDE THE CHURCH OF THE ENCARNACION

    by LoriPori Written Feb 21, 2006

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    Chapel of the Encarnation

    I have never seen such a beautiful Church as the Church of the Encarnation. There were 13 Chapels, each one unique and dedicated to a saint or event. The one pictured here is the Chapel of the Encarnation. The altarpiece is marble and contains important sculptures of the "Annunciation" and the patron saint of Malaga, San Ciriaco and Santa Paula, on the sides. You can also see the white marble mausoleum of Bishop Molina Lario showing him in prayer and the mausoleum of the Dominican Bishop Fray Bernardo Manrique.
    Other Chapels include:Chapel of the Conception, Santa Barbara Chapel, Chapel of Saint Rafael, Chapel of San Jose', Chapel of Saint Julian, Chapel of Saint Francis of Assisi and many others.

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    IGLESIA CATEDRAL DE LA ENCARNACION

    by LoriPori Written Feb 20, 2006

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    Catedral de la Encarnation
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    Malaga Cathedral IGLESIA CATEDRAL DE LA ENCARNACION is the city's most important historical monument . It was built after the Catholic Kings reconquered the city in 1487, on the site of the former Aljama Mosque, which dated back to the times of IslamicMalaga. The cathedral is known as La Manquita ( The little one-armed lady ) because, due to the suspension of construction in 1782, the southern tower was never completed.
    It contains a variety of different styles, combining old Gothic and the new Renaissance styles, Among the treasures in the interior are the five stained glass windows, which were created between the end of the 19th century and the 1960's and whose theme is the Redemption of Christ. The chapels contain important and valuable paintings by grand masters of Baroque like Alonso Cano ( 18 ), Pedro de Mena and Claudio Coello ( 17 ).
    I counted thirteen different chapels. I have never seen so many beautiful chapels.
    Entry fee was 3,50 Euro

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    The "One Armed Lady"

    by iNorv9 Written Feb 15, 2006

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    La Manquita from the Alcazaba
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    Known as La Manquita (The One Armed Lady) because only one of the towers has been completed, Malaga’s cathedral provides a display melange of Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque architecture. Inside, the impressive vaulted ceilings are complemented by galleries containing statues and carvings, as well as several massive oil portraits.

    Cost: 3.50

    Bottom-line: Features some beautiful art and architecture, but serves also as a serene place to escape the heat.

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    The Interior of the Cathedral

    by hquittner Written Dec 25, 2005

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    Organ in Coro Wall and Ceiling detail
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    On entering through the Sacristy, one is unexpectedly struck by the immensity of the structure. I did not realise that this is one of the largest Cathedrals in the world (longer than Seville, 6 yds shorter than Notre Dame; taller than Beauvais and with its aisle roof as high as the nave!). Inkeeping with its size the immense double(pipe) organ and giant Coro are in proportion. (it would be nice tohear the organ reverberate in such a space! The only Gothic effects are the ribbed vaults near the numerous circular "domes". For all of this it is a simple 3 aisled hall church with an ambulatory. The lateral flanks and ambulatory are filled with chapels containing various religious expressions (and artwork) that require a guide (which we did not find). One contained a finely carved 17C wooden polychromed crucifix. But the finest work is the Coro containing 103 carved stalls of saints by Pedro de Mena, favorite pupil of Alonso Cano (who did some of them as well as other sculptures in the church). Unfortunately the gates of the Coro were closed. I would have paid an extra fee to go in and study them and would have been glad to acquire a guide pamphlet but this was apparently not available. How can one appreciate such treasures? Look as well as you can. Perhaps someday they will properly exploit their inheritance.

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