Ronda Things to Do

  • Ronda perched on its cliff above the river valley
    Ronda perched on its cliff above the...
    by Bwana_Brown
  • Rio Guadiaro valley from Parador Hotel area
    Rio Guadiaro valley from Parador Hotel...
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  • Ronda view from Plaza del Campillo
    Ronda view from Plaza del Campillo
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Most Recent Things to Do in Ronda

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    Plaza del Socorro

    by solopes Written Jul 11, 2014
    Ronda - Spain
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    Centrally located, this is one of the most touristy squares in Ronda, topped by Socorro church and lined with bars, and restaurants. A nice fountain stands in the center, above a covered parking very well placed but not easy to big cars.

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    Philip V arch

    by solopes Written Jul 11, 2014

    In the 18th century the old muslim bridge collapsed, and this new entrance was rapidly built, in 1742, with a less steep road, and an arch becoming the point to collect the taxes due to enter the city. Getting the name of the king by the time of its construction Felipe V, it was the city's main entrance until the construction of the new bridge.

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    Wandering around

    by shavy Written Jan 25, 2014

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    Just beautiful to looked at
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    Keep moving along the wall and you'll end up at the entrance gate of the old Ronda after you walk down the street all the way back up to the bridge over the gorge

    For the most amazing views of the bridge itself you have now on the other side are exactly
    Walk from the bridge towards the old town, turn right into the narrow streets and looking to go to the Puerta de los Molinos

    From the square there is a path down . At first quietly , but soon it becomes more difficult path to walk. Perseverance ! At some point you reach the remains of an ancient fort , from there you can see the bridge are in full glory

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    The rock wall

    by shavy Written Jan 25, 2014
    Taken from the otherside
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    The most remarkable Spanish cities . Ronda is built on two rocks , which the 150 meter deep valley forms of the Rio Guadelevin

    Because of this vast valley , the city , as it were divided in half , while the houses on the edge of the gorge seem to balance

    To connect the old part of town and the new section together was in the eighteenth century, a spectacular bridge built which now has become a special tourist attraction

    From the bridge you have a fantastic view of the huge valley where the river Guadelevin a small stream seems to be

    Through stairs you descend a bit along the bridge , a popular attraction for sightseers . But who really wants to see the most beautiful view of Ronda there must insert anything energy

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    Puente Viejo

    by shavy Written Jan 25, 2014

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    The gap of the bridge
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    The Moorish bridge is a real tourist attraction. The bridge and gorge are very special
    You can walk into the gorge for an even better view

    This "old bridge" located in a lower portion of the walls of Ronda
    This bridge was built to the construction of the new bridge, and was built in 1616 and used for pedestrians to connects from the old to the new town
    The bridge consists of one arch of 10 meters and is 31 meters high above the river

    During the 42 years of construction, many builders deceased. The room under the central arch was used as a prison. Beautiful is the view from the bridge over the beautiful countryside of Andalusia

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    The house of the Moorish king

    by solopes Written Jan 13, 2014
    Ronda - Spain
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    The so called palace was built in the 18th century, when the moorish were already gone for centuries. The only real thing from Moorish times is a staircase, cut in the walls of the cliffs by slaves, to bring water from the river when the city was besieged.

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    Arena

    by egonwegh Updated Aug 8, 2013
    Ronda, bullring
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    Bullfighting arena or bullring in the town of Ronda. In the halls adjacent to the ring itself, you'll find stables and two museums. One museum contains costumes, paintings, hand coloured drawings and decorations associated with bullfighting, the other contains among others a wide variety of old rifles dating back to the 18th and 19th century. These drew my attention because one of my ancestors was a Dutch soldier in the army of Napoleon who went to Spain in 1808/1809.

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    Museo del Bandolero

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jul 30, 2013

    Ronda was once at the center of an area that had great problems with outlaws. This museum gives you a look into the life of the outlaw, how they survived, an outline of some of their exploits.

    Much of what you will see in Ronda has to do with history of long ago and this museum is a real departure from that. Certainly a nice change of pace.

    As museums go I preferred the Lara Museum nearby, but this was a good (not great) attraction in Ronda. There is a good history of bandolerismo in the area, particularly the Serrania de Ronda..the major personalities, their "accomplishments" and ends. Though well supported with a lot of articles I don't remember any of it being in English. It will give you a glimpse of Andalucia's equivalent of the Wild West.

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    City Fortifications- Puerta de Almocabar

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jul 30, 2013

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    Puerta de Almcabar
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    The bottom of the Old Town is where you will find the mightiest walls. The only traffic that would have entered the city through this gate would be from Gibraltar/Algeciras...the coast. This is not where most of the traffic into town came from. Why then is the gate there the most spectacular of the city gates? Possibly it may have been considered the main gate to the city, given the size of the walls. The lovely plaza in front of the gate, open and airy, was once the city cemetery in Moslem times. Not usually where they would place the main gate to the city, no?

    The Almocabar Gate was built in the 13th century. The Carlos V gate, honoring the first Hapsburg King of Spain, was basically carved out of the wall in the mid 16th century. (see below)

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    Centro de Interpretacion- Puente Nuevo

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jul 30, 2013

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    Located in the 60 meter squared space directly under the bridge this little museum gives you an overview of the construction and history of the bridge, though really it is more about the challenges and the actual construction process (and progress.)

    When you see pictures of the bridge look directly under the bridge, the window you see, that's where this is located.

    Supposedly this space has had a somewhat colorful history over time. It was apparently used as a prison/torture center. Hemingway talks about prisoners being thrown alive from this structure in "for Whom the bell tolls" though it is now said that this is just a great story by a great writer, not reality. Perhaps someone is hiding something?

    Entry price- 2 euros. The museum is mildly interesting, but the views are phenomenal, well worth it.

    Autumn and Winter
    Monday to Friday 10am till 6pm (10:00-18:00)
    Saturdays, Sundays and Public Holidays 10am till 3pm (10:00-15:00)

    Spring and Summer
    Monday to Friday 10am till 7pm (10:00-19:00)
    Saturdays, Sundays and Public Holidays 10am till 3pm (10:00-15:00)

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    Tourist Information

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jul 30, 2013

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    Located on the same plaza as my hotel, I stopped in to the tourist information office to have a look and see what they had. I seem to remember they had little in the way of hand out material but I got some nice suggestions about the museums to see in town.

    They do have some nice things for sale. There are the obligatory posters announcing the bullfights and festivals, which are very colorful and might make a nice decoration back home. There were some nice books and some beautiful coffee table books. Of course, scenery like Ronda's tends to be a magnet for photographers, so a lot of the books they had were heavy on the photography.

    Help was in English or Spanish. I'm fairly sure German and French were available as well.
    Note- this service is run by the Junta de Andalucia, the regional government, rather than by the city government.

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    Museo Lara

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jul 13, 2013

    This was a pleasant find in Ronda. It is really more of a collection of a local resident than a museum proper. Not surprisingly, this museum at times had what seemed like a motley assortment of things that Mr Lara has collected over the years. I particularly enjoyed his collection of clocks. There is also a rather chilling exhibition of instruments of torture and a section on witchcraft.

    Though the price of admission has been raised since I was there, I remember it was an enjoyable museum. It has a nice variety of things the owner has collected and is interested in. If given the choice of seeing this museum or the Museo del Bandolero nearby I would chose this one.

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    Plaza de Toros de Ronda

    by GentleSpirit Written Mar 18, 2013

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    Entrance to the bullring
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    Located just two blocks from the Puente Nuevo, Ronda's Plaza de Toros is one of the oldest in Spain. It was constructed between 1779 and 1785. The Romero family of Ronda was considered some of the forefathers of modern bullfighting. Pedro Romero, for example, was credited with having fought almost 6,000 bulls without incurring serious injury.

    As Ronda is somewhat small, the corridas are not as frequent as they are in Malaga or Seville. Ronda does have a unique corrida, which is called corrida goyesca. Here they dress up in costumes from the time of Goya. Nothing else is different from a normal bullfight, other than that everyone is dressed up.

    I didn't go inside the bullring since I had already seen the one in Seville.

    Hours-
    January_February 10:00-18:00 h.
    March 10:00-19:00 h.
    April-September 10:00-20:00 h.
    October 10:00-19:00 h.
    November-December 10:00-18:00 h.

    Admission- 6.50 euros
    Audioguide- 1.50 euro- available in English, Spanish, German, French and Italian

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    Church of Padre Jesus

    by HORSCHECK Updated Feb 24, 2013

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    Church of Padre Jesus
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    The Church of Padre Jesus (Iglesia Padre Jesus) was built in the early 16th century and is therefore one of the oldest churches in Ronda. The building consists of Gothic and Renaissance style elements.

    In front of the church the famous Fountain of Eight Spouts (Fuente de los Ocho Canos) can be found.

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    Fountain of Eight Spouts

    by HORSCHECK Updated Feb 24, 2013

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    Fountain of Eight Spouts

    The Fountain of Eight Spouts (Fuente de los Ocho Canos) dates back to the first half of the 18th century when it was comissioned by King Philip V. It was entirely constructed of stone.

    The fountain shows Ronda's coat of arms and eight spouts with ornate rosettes on one side and consists of a water trough for animals on the other side.

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Ronda Things to Do

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