Ronda Things to Do

  • Ronda perched on its cliff above the river valley
    Ronda perched on its cliff above the...
    by Bwana_Brown
  • Rio Guadiaro valley from Parador Hotel area
    Rio Guadiaro valley from Parador Hotel...
    by Bwana_Brown
  • Ronda view from Plaza del Campillo
    Ronda view from Plaza del Campillo
    by Bwana_Brown

Most Recent Things to Do in Ronda

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    Alameda del Tajo

    by solopes Written Feb 7, 2013
    Ronda - Spain
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    Tajo is a large river that flows... far fro Ronda. However the name is commonly associated to the city, and to the canyon where flows Guadalevin river. Lining part of the canyon's rim, there a planted avenue, coming from the 19th century, with pleasant shades under the violent son of Andalusia, with good sightseeing points.

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    New bridge

    by solopes Written Feb 7, 2013
    Ronda - Spain
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    Built in the beginning of the 18th century This bridge became the symbol of the city. Modern architecture would make easy to link the edges of the narrow canyon, but centuries ago it had to be built from he bottom of it. 120 meters high, with strange proportions that make it... ugly, it is funny to see tourists searching the perfect angle to picture it, impossible to obtain from the city - you will have to descend a pathway in the canyon, and that... only the furious photographers will risk.

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    Old City

    by solopes Written Feb 7, 2013
    Ronda - Spain
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    All the old ambiance of Ronda is concentrated in a small area, easy to walk around. Christians and Muslims remains share the space with the bright colours of Andalucia enhancing the whole. A very well elaborated street map, available free in the tourist office, will allow you to identify everything and to easily circulate in the narrow streets.

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  • GentleSpirit's Profile Photo

    Lots of noble houses

    by GentleSpirit Written Dec 29, 2012
    Marques de Salvatierra
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    One thing you will notice walking around town is a fairly good number of shields over the doorways. What this means is that this is (or was) the home of a member of the nobility.
    Remember, of course, that Ronda was one of the last Moslem cities conquered before the capture of Granada, which was the final Moslem city to fall to the advancing Christians. Therefore, Ferdinand of Aragon doled out special perks to those who were instrumental in these conquests.
    Several of the Rondan nobility went on to carve out important positions in the settlement of the New World.

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    Iglesia Espiritu Santo

    by GentleSpirit Written Dec 15, 2012

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    Iglesia del Espiritu Santo

    The Church of the Holy Spirit (Espiritu Santo) was started the same year that Ronda was conquered by the Christians, 1485. Following the tradition, this church was built on what used to be a mosque, right by the Almocabar Gate.

    The exterior is very plain, Gothic military fortress style. Inside it is a mixture, it has elements of both Gothic and Renaissance in it. It doesn't have this towering feeling of a Gothic church, the stained glass is very simple i thought. It also doesn't have the lightness or increasing ornateness of the Renaissance. A pretty church to visit, very much a parish church.

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  • GentleSpirit's Profile Photo

    A town at the edge of the precipice

    by GentleSpirit Written Dec 10, 2012

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    You will see the expression "Casas colgadas" in Spain from time to time. Usually they are referring to houses that look like they are suspended from the rock (Cuenca, for example.)

    Here in Ronda, you will see the something similar. Parts of the city are literally constructed at the edge of the precipice. From the lookouts the views over the countryside are magnificent, but can you imagine if you had that view from your own living room? Wow

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    Puente Nuevo

    by GentleSpirit Written Dec 9, 2012

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    Puente Nuevo
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    The Puente Nuevo (New Bridge) is a stunning work architecturally. It spans the 120 meter deep gorge that carries the Guadalevin River. It is 66 meters wide and 98 meters high, quite an accomplishment. It divides Ronda, predictably into the New City and the Old.

    There is really nothing "new" about this bridge. Though the idea of building a bridge at this location was thrown around much earlier, construction didn't start on this bridge until 1751, taking some 40 years to complete.

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  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    Strolling around Ronda.

    by cachaseiro Updated Feb 16, 2012

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    Ronda.

    The town of Ronda is very pretty and you can stroll around there for hours without getting bored.
    The architecture there is very andalucian and the town is full of little squares and churches.
    Ronda is divided in to a new and an old part of town and as you might have guessed it´s the old part of town that looks the nicest, but even the new part of town is not that bad either and i would say you should take your time to explore.

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  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    The oldest bull fighting ring in the world.

    by cachaseiro Updated Feb 16, 2012

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    The bullfighting ring in Ronda.

    Ronda is the place where bull fighting first started and the old bullfighting arena is still there in the middle of town.
    I'll leave it up to you to have your own opinions about bull fighting, but now you know where it came from and the ring is quite interesting to visit even if you are not a fan of the game.

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  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    Enjoy the view from Ronda.

    by cachaseiro Updated Feb 16, 2012

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    View from Ronda.
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    Because of it´s dramatic setting on a cliff you have spectacular views of the surrounding countryside.
    The town has cliffs that drops straight down right by the town center and it gives Ronda a very dramatic effect in itself.
    The views you get from Ronda is pretty much the biggest sight of them all in my opinion.

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  • aussirose's Profile Photo

    See the home of bullfighting Ronda Spain

    by aussirose Written Jan 13, 2012

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    Ronda Spain home of bullfighting by aussirose
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    Ronda is the birthplace of modern bullfighting. This was our first sighting of a bullfighting ring - in Ronda.

    Bullfighting has been mostly ruled out now in Spain and a good job too because the things I have learnt about what they do to the poor bulls before they die from exhaustion is just horrible.

    Today this bullfighting ring is a Museum and you can walk inside the arena. We passed....and did a bit of El Toro gift shopping instead.

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  • aussirose's Profile Photo

    Puente Nuevo - Awesome bridge in Ronda

    by aussirose Written Jan 13, 2012

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    Puente Nuevo - Awesome bridge in Ronda
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    The Puente Nuevo is Ronda's icon. People come from all around the world to see this awesome sight. The canyon walls are around 100 metres high and the bridge straddles over the top. From here the views over the valley both sides are stunning! No wonder it is so popular!

    Check out my travelogue for more pix.

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  • peterdhduncan's Profile Photo

    Puente Nuevo

    by peterdhduncan Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Puente Nuevo
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    Puente Nuevo is a magnificent struture built between 1759 and 1793. a previous bridge having collapsed in 1741, killing 50 people.

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  • Bwana_Brown's Profile Photo

    Impressive El Tajo gorge

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Nov 28, 2009

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    El Tajo gorge as it opens out onto the valley
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    Ronda's other river, the Rio Guadalevin, is very short in length, rising in the hills behind Ronda and finishing as a tributary of the Rio Guadiaro after flowing only a relatively short distance. However, the dramatic way it makes this journey is what has made Ronda the 3rd most popular tourist destination in Andalusia, displacing Cordoba and with only Sevilla and Granada drawing more visitors.

    Ronda is actually perched on a huge chunk of peridotite, the type of solidified lava immediately above the molten core of the planet. Under the world's oceans, the layer of peridotite is roughly 100 km thick, with only about 6 km of other rock types layered above it. Ronda is one of the places where, as the continents bumped into each other millions of years ago, a chunk of oceanic periodite was forced to the surface as the continental plates battled each other. Peridotite is about mid-point on the rock hardness scale, making it harder than iron. Always nice to know you are standing on the edge of something solid!

    Over the centuries the Rio Guadalevin has cut its way down through this rock layer, creating the 120-m deep El Tajo gorge as gravity forces it to flow toward the Rio Guadiaro valley below. With the city cut in two by this narrow but deep gash, over a long time span three bridges have been built to connect the two halves - Puente Romano, then Puente Viejo and finally Puente Nuevo.

    The depth of the gorge was awe-inspiring as we first looked down as well as out from Puente Nuevo toward the distant broad valley. The 2nd photo is basically the same view but up and to the left a bit, showing the wall of the gorge leading to our eventual 'lookout' point by Plaza del Campillo over there somewhere. The 3rd photo was taken after we crossed the road to the other side of the bridge to look inland, and shows a much narrower gorge as the river winds its way into and through Ronda from the distant hills.

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  • Bwana_Brown's Profile Photo

    From the 'Lookout'

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Sep 7, 2009

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    Ronda perched on its cliff above the river valley
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    In early afternoon, following the museum visit, we took a walk along Calle Tenorio which is the first street to your right after crossing Puente Nuevo from New Ronda. It runs along the edge of the escarpment above the river valley and has a wall of hotels with their fancy restaurants lining the edge of the drop-off. Sample menus are posted streetside and the various entrance doors were open, allowing passing pedestrians to see straight through the hotels to the tables set up outside on the edge of the cliff. Very tempting but also very expensive judging from the menus.

    Our walk ended at the pleasant Plaza del Campillo, one of the few open spaces on the edge of the gorge that is accessable to wandering tourists. It has fantastic balconies that overlook the river valley as well as a set of steps that zigzag down to the valley floor below in case you want to see Ronda from a completely different perspective. The ruins of old flour mills can be seen below and it is possible to double back to Puente Nuevo while in the depths to see what it looks like from below, but we were starting to run out of time by then and it looked like quite a hike! The 2nd photo shows the line of hotels with the distant path zigzaging downward from the Plaza. The 3rd photo was taken beside the iron fence at Plaza Campillo looking back toward Puente Nuevo.

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Ronda Things to Do

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