Salobreña Travel Guide

  • Salobreña
    by illumina
  • Salobrena, beach
    Salobrena, beach
    by egonwegh
  • Salobrena, cobblestone street
    Salobrena, cobblestone street
    by egonwegh

Salobreña Things to Do

  • Back alley no. 1

    A walk through the back alleys. We make it a habit to visit back alleys when we're abroad, they reveal a lot about the way locals go about their daily business. Or more specifically in this case, how they solve their parking problems.

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  • Back alley no. 2

    Unsuspecting traveller suddenly confronted with a (resting!) dog in one of the steep back alleys of the town of Salobrena.

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  • Artistic Salobrena

    Artistic Salobrena, decorated tiles, stone benches ...The original Virgen del Rocio (depicted here in one of our pictures on beautiful decorated tiles) is a small carved wooden statue of the Virgin and Child, venerated in Almonte, Spain according to Wikipedia. And even cobblestones can be used to create a work of art here in Salobrena.

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  • Day Trip to Almunecar Aquapark

    We spent a day in Almunecar Aquapark. It's only a 13 kilometre journey from Salobrena and takes around 15 mins.It's not a huge aquapark by any means, but plenty enough to keep three small people of 8,10 & 11 amused for hours. They really enjoyed the slides, especially the Black Hole.The park has cafes and ice cream parlours a-plenty, a safe deposit...

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  • Swan around looking beautiful ...

    Of course, after some weeks of swimming, sunbathing, relaxing and eating good food in Salobrena...One needs to show off ones tan and dress accordingly glam for an evening out.In Salobrena, as in much of Spain, people often start their evening with a paseo - a stroll along the promende to admire and be admired. Dinner is often not until 10pm and...

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  • Eat drink and be merry

    The Gypsy Dancer and I took a strong liking to El Penon retsuarant on the beach. Their seafood and salads were great and they served a particularly nice white Rioja wine to wash it down with. The view from the restaurant was fantastic - a perfect setting to eat, drink and be merry after a hard morning lying around reading on an unspoilt beach ;...

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  • Climb the Hill to the Pueblo

    The old village of Salobrena perched on a large rock jutting out of the landscape, is a wonderful Moorish Maze of old winding streets, white painted houses built higgledy-piggledy on top of one another and crowned by a 10th centuary castle on the top. Unlike some of the other white villages, it is not spoilt by tourism and there you will find a...

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  • When it's hot - Do nothing!

    It was August and it was hot. Although I should point out, that Salobrena does not seem to get as hot as other places along that coast thanks to a cool sea breeze, the climate was perfect.We spent day after day with the small people, doing absolutely nothing but lying on the beach reading, swimming and snorkling. The sea is very clear and perfect...

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  • Dance flamenco

    We saw some good flamenco this trip. Not your cheesy cabaret style, but local flamenco in relaxed surroundings. The gypsy Dancer taught the Small People a Tangos which they practised at every opportunity They got pretty good. Here they are dancing in the grounds of Salobrena castle under a shrine to Our Lady one hot summer evening. Inspired by some...

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  • Salobrena Old Town

    The old town of Salobrena is a series of small streets with whitewashed buildings. The old blends well with the new behind the whitewash and the narrow streets rise up to the old fort at the top of the hill on which the town was built. The newer part of the town spreads down towards the main beach while below the fort to the left are the sugar can...

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  • La Playa de Salobrena

    The beach in Salobrena is a long shingle / pebble beach. It has plenty of bars / restuarants / pizza places along it but when we were the season hadn't started yet and many were not open. It was the May bank holiday and as the whether ws good a lot of people came to the beach for the day and most seemed to be local rather than tourist as a result...

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  • Sugar Cane Factory

    If you are in Salobrena you should go down to the old sugar cane fields beneath the Castle. They are still being cultivated today as they have been for hundreds of years, although tractors are now used to cut the cane. The factory is still in use and when you are in the area there is a pungent sweet smell from the cane being processed. Its exactly...

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  • Salobrena Castle

    This is an old fort built by the Moors and is perched on the rocky outcrop overlooking Salobrena. The narrow windy streets up to the castle are a challenge if you are driving and a bigger one if you are walking as they are all up hill lol ! Check the opening times ...the castle is usually closed 2-5 .....siesta time I guess. The entrance fee is...

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  • Watch the Sunset

    ..over the sea.Just beautiful.There are are couple of beach restaurants ('chiriguitos' ) where you can sip a cold drink and watch the sunset...or climb the rock ('el Penon') and do the same.My favourite beach restaurant was El Penon by the rock.

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  • Wine, Fish, Go- Carts and Bouncy...

    Along the promenade at Salobrena, there are alot of cafes, restaurants and bars varying from cheap and cheerful, where you can just grab a glass of wine and a racion of fried fish, to the upmarket Argentinian Steak House where you cook your own meat on hot coals at your table (the latter not for me I have to say, but meat eaters have highly...

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Salobreña Hotels

  • Hotel Avenida Tropical

    Avenida Mediterraneo, 33, Salobrena, 18690, Spain

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Business

    Hotel Class 3 out of 5 stars

  • Best Western Hotel Salobrena

    Ctra Malaga -- Almeria Km 323, Salobrena, Granada Province, 18680, Spain

    Satisfaction: Average

    Good for: Families

    Hotel Class 3.5 out of 5 stars

  • Hostal Jayma

    C/ Cristo 24, Salobrena, 18680, es

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Families

Salobreña Restaurants

  • A great little bar/restaurant near the...

    We came across this little bar & restaurant late one night in February and just about everywhere was closed except Meson de Teja on the Paseo Maritimo in Salobrena. It is run by a fabulous couple, Jose and Nines, who make you feel like you have come to visit them in their own home. The food is very good and although the menu isn't extensive and is...

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  • Salobrena Steakhouse

    great steaks that you cook yourself at your table on stone slabs. The stones are baked in the oven and you cut your steak in thin strips and place them on the stones and remove when done to your taste. you can have pork or chicken alternatives to steak.Great meal but not for vegetarians. er ...let me see...steak

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  • Uppa The Hill

    If you are staying in the old town on the rock as we were, a visit to Bar Peseta is a must. Recommended to us by the owners of our house.We found our way (through the tunnel, but that's another story) there one evening. If the small people have a siesta in the afternoon, you can take them out quite late without them being tired, and they are...

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Salobreña Nightlife

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    by amapola66 Updated Nov 30, 2006

    We were lucky enough to be in Salobrena for the Festival Flamenco ‘Lucero del Alba’ in August. The Gyspy Dancer, myself and the Small People made enquiries at the Casa de Culture in town and came out smiling with our tickets (8 euros for the two adults, small people free of charge).

    Slightly out of town in the grounds of Casa Roja - We experienced some fine flamenco singing from 'Louis de Cordoba' with guitarist “Manuel Silveria” (Louis de Cordoba was amazing and totally enchanted me) and 'El Chocolate' (I think that was his name !) among others; the latter standing up and bellowing out an acapella heartfelt song across the hills and planes was something to experience.

    The concert also featured a couple of dancers that were refreshingly nothing like the cabaret style flamenco featured in the uk - this dancer in particular was rather more Arabic in style. This is not cabaret flamenco, rather more serious (and yet relaxed at the same time ). If you're looking for something lighter and more jovial, I would suggest an evening out at one of the barbecue/show type venues- (I will write a further tip about the one just outside Almunecar soon) - They are great fun.

    Very enjoyable.

    Later on in the week, still part of the summer festival, there was also a free outdoor concert. Staged on a jutting out piece of rock right on the coast, in the nearby village of La Caleta. The sound of those vocal calls echoing across the hills with a backdrop of the illuminated castle at night, was magical.

    Dress Code: As you like.

    Flamenco dancer  - Lucero del Alba festival. Flamenco singers at La Caleta
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    • Women's Travel
    • Music
    • Festivals

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Salobreña Transportation

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    by amapola66 Updated Feb 2, 2008

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    Pick up the E902 (also called N323) highway to Motril to get to Salobrena from Granada and back. This takes you through the Lecrin valley (meaning the ‘Vale of Happiness’ in Arabic).

    The route is rather scenic (for those not keeping both eyes on the road!) and you pass some rather surreal wind turbines and the (rather contravercial ) Rules dam ( pictured here). Apparently, the dam is filling up with much needed water, but they haven't organised a way of getting the water to the coastal towns yet !

    You will pass many typical villages such as such as Padul, Durcal and Niguelas and a turning for the neo-hippy town of Orgiva. The journey to Niguelas takes 45 - 55 mins 'mas or menos'.

    La Presa de Rules - Lecrin Valley. Wind power
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    • Road Trip

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Salobreña Shopping

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    by windcity Written Oct 14, 2007

    Quite by surprise we stumbled upon a church run charity shop half way up the hill towards the castle. This large building is interesting in its own right, painted ceilings, carved door-ways, an elegant staircase. I'm no expert and I didn't get to ask about the house so If any VT member has any information I'd be glad to know. It stocks all kinds of Brick a Brack, furniture, clothes, music & books, Plus are large selection of "antiques". I think it is open from 10am to 2 pm daily.

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Salobreña Warnings and Dangers

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    by amapola66 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    As some of you who spent some time on the Med last year may know, there was an invasion of jelly fish all over - Spain, France and Italy too from what we heard. Thousands of the horrible little things drifted to shallow water making it impossible to swim. Apparently, this happens around every 7 years (although I have heard that there has been an invasion in Mazzarron this year already). Cries of 'Medusa' could be heard from children from all directions and Spanish ladies were splodging large amounts of some sort of cream on any passing children who had been stung. (Not a serious sting, but I didn't fancy one!)

    Being Spain, the whole thing became a spot of theatre, with high drama and much amusement as people were catching them in buckets, empty bottles and even on their flip-flops then burying them in the sand until the beach became like a jelly-fish graveyard.

    Rather graceful in the water, they were absolutely disgusting looking out - Euwww !

    After a couple of days, the local council got a trawler and 95% or so dissappeared -
    Hooray!

    **Aug 2006/7 - Alas, they were back this year. Click the link below to hear why *

    Have sinse discovered, vinega is the thing for a sting. Many people spotted along the Med clutching bottles of cider vinega - strange, but true!

    Las Medusas
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Salobreña What to Pack

  • amapola66's Profile Photo

    by amapola66 Updated Jul 21, 2006

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Sun cream (lots of), swim suit, a long gypsy skirt or two (essential) with a couple of small tops that'll do for day or dress up with some jewlery for evening, comfortable walking shoes for those cobbled streets (i find espedrills give me blisters on those cobbles), a shawl which will protect from the sun, take off the chill of air-conditioning and will also act as a sun shield when draped over a sun umbrella - and most important - a very large sunhat.

    Nina in a pink hat.
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    • Beaches
    • Family Travel

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Salobreña Off The Beaten Path

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    by Tayto Written May 1, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    we rented a fantastic villa from Margaret Lingwood (Lingwood Immobelia in Salobrena). The road rises sharply and winds up the cliff on the road just outside the town. There are fantastic views of the town and the sea.

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Explore Deeper into Salobreña
Fresh Seafood on the Beach
Restaurants
Sunset
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Afternoon
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China plates
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Sugar cane fields
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Look-out
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A fortress with a view
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Fortress
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White houses
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Charming streets
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Seafood
Restaurants
Salobrena Beach
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