Local traditions and culture in Sevilla

  • Locals dancing at a cafe in La Macarena (2014)
    Locals dancing at a cafe in La Macarena...
    by fairy_dust
  • Inside a caseta at the feria (2014)
    Inside a caseta at the feria (2014)
    by fairy_dust
  • Outside a caseta at the feria (2014)
    Outside a caseta at the feria (2014)
    by fairy_dust

Most Viewed Local Customs in Sevilla

  • into-thin-air's Profile Photo

    Obtaining your Credentials in Seville

    by into-thin-air Written Nov 8, 2011

    You first port of call should be the Cathedral as this is where the Official version is issued – However the office isn’t always open – It wasn’t when we were trying to get ours so we were directed to the Bar Miami which is open most days until around Midnight, here you can get credentials that are issued by The Association of Friends of the Camino in Seville and these are accepted in the Refugio’s as well as in the Compostela office when you eventually reach Santiago.
    To find the Bar Miami, cross the Triana Bridge and keep walking; the
    bar is located half-way down the first commercial block on the left-hand side. It has a big sign that says "Miami".

    Buen Camino
    Rob

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Backpacking
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Carmela71's Profile Photo

    Sevilla tours

    by Carmela71 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This buses sometimes are a good option if you do not have much time to spend walking around, or it is raining or it is too hot.

    We did not do it, as we walked all sevilla around, getting lost (on purposse) in all the little streets and walking all over the places we could manage, but the itinerary of these buses is veery complete, so if short of time, I recomend them

    Was this review helpful?

  • oriettaIT's Profile Photo

    Meal time

    by oriettaIT Written Dec 12, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Something you have to be aware going to Spain is that their meal habit is a little different than mostly of the other country.
    They dont do breakfast much, maybe a coffee and something little. Their lunch is around 2.30-3pm and nobody go out for dinner before 10pm. If you try to go to eat earlier you will find only tourist in the restaurant.
    The good news is that there are tapas bar all over the place and here you can eat almost all day long. We had some meal in those and it turned out to be real fun to try ten different little plate of food drinking a nice beer.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Bwana_Brown's Profile Photo

    Orange tree streets

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Apr 3, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    My first experience with orange trees as street decorations struck me five years ago while in the city of Castelo Branco, Portugal. I was so amazed at their decorative beauty that I forgot to take any photos of them - so I vowed that I would not make that same mistake the next time I saw them!

    As it turns out, these 'sour orange' trees (sometimes called 'Seville oranges') are used for street decorations all over the city, thanks to their more erect bearing and compact crown when compared to the sweeter varieties of orange trees.

    It is believed that sour orange trees originated in Asia and were brought to Europe by Arab traders in the 800s and had reached Seville some time in the 1100s. Thanks to Spanish exploration and colonization trips in the following centuries, this variety of orange trees continued to spread throughout the world, reaching the Caribbean islands and Mexico in the 1500s.

    One of its attractive features as a decorative tree is that it does not require a lot of attention, so much so that some of them have lived for as long as 600 years! They are not called 'sour' oranges without a reason - their main uses today, other than as decoratives, are in flavouring seafood with their juice (sort of like a lemon) as well as the making of marmalades.

    I was thinking of reaching up to try one myself, wondering why so many of these delicious looking fruits were just hanging there. Now I know why!

    Orange tree above us at the Glassy Lounge cafe Orange trees behind the Cathedral A side street near the Real Alc��zar
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • tini58de's Profile Photo

    Religious Processions

    by tini58de Updated Oct 5, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Not only during the Semana Santa are there many processions, but also throughout the year you can see processions!

    When we were there in September 2008 we encountered two processions during our 4 day stay!

    One was on a Saturday evening, when we suddenly heard a brass band play and everybody in the tapas bar went outside to have a look at the procession. When the "paso" passed by there were rose petals coming from atop, a scent of frankincense - quite fascinating to us strangers! Later that evening, when we wanted to go back to our apartment, the street was still blocked with the procession.

    The next morning we passed by a church and there was a crowd of people outside waiting, so we stood next to them and sure enough, shortly after the door opened and the "paso" was carried outside. Clergymen and people with wooden crosses and huge candles walked in front of the procession, then the Madonna and the congregation followed.

    Quite a sight!

    Saturday night procession

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    The Flamenco Frock

    by keeweechic Written Oct 2, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Probably seen by the world as the traditional costume of Spain. If you are serious about wearing the dress correctly you must take several things into consideration, like the number and width of flounces, the cut of the sleeve and where the waist line will sit There is also the version of ‘the season’ just like any other fashion which would become outdated the following year.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    The Cordoban Hats

    by keeweechic Written Oct 1, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Cordoban Hat or Sevillian hat has become one of the most important representations of the Spanish culture. It comes largely in black but also other colours such as grey and beige and is made of mostly wool, felt or rabbit hair. It is worn not only by men but by the women as well, usually at bull fights, horse riding and of course in flamenco dancing. It is believed that the hat had its beginnings in Cordoba, hence the name, although it is thought that it was used by farm workers. It became more popular during the 19th and early part of the 20th century.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Fans

    by keeweechic Written Oct 1, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The flamenco dancers or Bailaoras use the fan to almost have a conversation. There are numerous movements of the hand and fan which relate particular meanings such as drawing across the eyes, means ‘I am sorry’, fanning herself slowly means ‘I am married’ etc.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Seville Shawls

    by keeweechic Written Oct 1, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Seville Shawl or Manila Shawl had its beginnings in the Philippines when Spain colonized the country. Originally belonging to the Chinese with its oriental designs, the silk shawl soon became popular as a protection against the cold and the Spanish redesigned the decorations with brightly coloured flowers and birds. The shawl was brought back to Spain and became a part of the flamenco dancer’s wardrobe. There is a village called Villamanrique de la Condesa who has become well known for the making of these beautiful shawls

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Orange Trees

    by keeweechic Written Oct 1, 2008

    All around Seville you will see orange trees. These are not the usual sweet oranges that you eat but more a bitter or tart orange which is used in the area for making marmalade as well as in alcoholic drinks such as Grand Marnier, Curacao and Triple Sec.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jawnuta's Profile Photo

    LA VELA DE SANTA ANA - Fiesta

    by Jawnuta Written Sep 29, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    21-26 July
    LA VELA DE SANTA ANA (The Candle of St Anna)
    This annual festival in Triana celebrates the areas patron saints, Santiago and la Sena Santa Ana. Trianeros, the Triana residents, throw their own local feria in and around Calle Betis. Festivities start with the Opening Speech in Plaza del Altozano, where performances take place every evening on the stage. On Calle Betis itself there are casetas offering traditional fare: fried fish, grilled sardines and hazelnuts. The religious aspect of the festivals includes worship at the so-called cathedral of Triana (Santa Ana church), Gozos played by the Banda de Tres Caidas and special floral displays.
    Calle Betis

    Flamenco fiesta food

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Susanna's treachery

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written May 18, 2006

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A lot of legends are connected with Santa Cruz district. One of the legends explains the name of Calle Susona street. Jew Susanna has grown fond of a christian knight. When she has found out, that her father with friends are going to kill Christians, she solved on treachery and warned about it her beloved. In a Jewish pogrom which followed the girl and her family were killed. In memory of treachery her skull was hung out above a doorway of Susanna's house. Improbably?

    Sevilla - Santa Cruz
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Minstrelette's Profile Photo

    Fiesta

    by Minstrelette Written Nov 18, 2005

    I happened upon a vibrant little fiesta while in Sevilla. Good food, good music, fun people... One thing that amazed me was that there were young children out at 1:00 in the morning, looking awake and extremely well behaved. Maybe the afternoon siesta helps them stay up until the wee hours without becoming cranky. Another interesting thing I saw that I've never seen before was a carousel with real horses. Animal lovers will probably hate that they do this, but I thought it was neat.

    carousel
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Study Abroad

    Was this review helpful?

  • Carmela71's Profile Photo

    Boat cruises

    by Carmela71 Updated Jul 20, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You can also get boat cruises along the Guadalquivir, there are many boats between San Telmo dridge and Triana bridge for different prices, some offer attractions as concerts, other dinners others just the boat excursion....

    We did it in our last visit, you pay 14 euros per person just for lkess than an hour tour to see all the bridges and can not be compared to other boat trips we have done in other cities as Prague or paris as you can not see much, naybe for photography as the angles you can get from the bridges from there ar emuch better of course

    Was this review helpful?

  • Hopkid's Profile Photo

    You Need to Ask for the Check

    by Hopkid Written Jul 8, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In Europe, dining is an experience that is meant to be enjoyed and not hurried through. This is reflected in the wait staff service. You may end up sitting for quite a long time after your dessert has long been eaten and your espresso quaffed. That's because your waiter will not bring you your check until you've asked for it. They don't bring it automatically because they don't want to seem like they are eager to rush you out of the place. So when you're ready to leave, simply get your waiter's attention and confidently ask, "La cuenta, por favor."

    Was this review helpful?

Sevilla Hotels

See all 228 Hotels in Sevilla

Latest Sevilla Hotel Reviews

Occidental Hotel Seville
268 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 8, 2014
Las Casas de la Juderia
778 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 10, 2014
Silken Al Andalus Palace Hotel
561 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 11, 2014
Alfonso XIII Hotel Seville
717 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 11, 2014
Alcora Hotel
77 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 5, 2014
Barcelo Renacimiento
214 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 10, 2014
Hotel Rey Alfonso X
142 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 10, 2014
Residencia y Restaurant Fernando III Sevilla
126 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 9, 2014
Parador De Carmona Hotel
222 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 6, 2014
Regina Hotel
159 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 10, 2014
Hotel Amadeus
1087 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 10, 2014
Hostal Goya
72 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jun 16, 2014
Hotel Murillo
479 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 10, 2014
Pension Dona Trinidad
47 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 3, 2014

Instant Answers: Sevilla

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

96 travelers online now

Comments

Sevilla Local Customs

Travel tips and advice posted by real travelers and Sevilla locals.
Map of Sevilla