Itálica, Sevilla

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  • Italica _ Santiponce
    Italica _ Santiponce
    by lotafro
  • Old Triana
    Old Triana
    by lotafro
  • Amphitheater of Italica
    Amphitheater of Italica
    by roamer61
  • Spoiled by Splendid Ruins of Italica

    by margatemensch Written Nov 28, 2013

    These Roman ruins are very special and date from the time of Augustus and Trajan.I was especially impressed with the wonderful Roman mosaics of birds and mythological figures(Venus,Mercury,Jupiter),The huge ampitheatre and the thermal baths were also very impressive.There is pertinent information in English at this site and the staff was helpful and cordial.The grounds at this site are beautiful and well-maintained.There is frequent bus service to Italica and Santiponce from the huge bus terminal at Plaza de Armas.Admission is currently 1.5 EurosThere are interesting ruins of the Roman Theatre and more baths outside the Italica site,but very close to it.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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  • lotafro's Profile Photo

    Look beyond your senses

    by lotafro Updated Sep 19, 2011
    Italica _ Santiponce
    1 more image

    there's more to Seville than palm trees and flamenco shows. Take the time to walk around and see where your feet lead you.
    The picture featured here is of a mosiac in Italica, Santiponce; ruins from the Roman Empire.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Study Abroad

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  • Carmela71's Profile Photo

    Italica ruins

    by Carmela71 Updated Nov 10, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mosaics

    Go to Santiponce just 10 km outside Sevilla in direction to Merida (You have to pass near the old Expo 92)

    a 100% recomended excursion, free entrance

    Italica was a roman city founded in 205 A.D. Its amphitheatre, the mosaics, the remains of thermal baths, the theatre and classical sculptures all deserve the visit

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  • roamer61's Profile Photo

    Roman City of Italica

    by roamer61 Updated Oct 31, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Amphitheater of Italica

    A short drive from Sevilla is the Roman Town of Italica. Founded in 206 BC, it was later enlarged and expanded by the Emperor Hadrian in the late 1st Century and early 2nd Century. Most of what is easily seen dates from the latter period. Amongst the foundations of houses and estates are mosaics that are well preserved. But it is the Amphitheater that is the main attraction. Once the 3-4th largest in the Roman World, it it still quite impressive depite the fact that much of the stonework had been pillaged over the centuries.

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  • GeoDenia's Profile Photo

    Itálica

    by GeoDenia Written Feb 25, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Itálica, about 8km northwest of Seville, on the northwest edge of the small town of Santiponce, was the first Roman town in Spain. Most of the Roman vetus urbs (old town) is now buried beneath Santiponce, but visitors can wander partly reconstructed ruins in the nova urbs (new town), which was added by emperor Hadrian, successor to Trajan. The ruins include one of the biggest Roman amphitheaters, the Termas Mayores public bathhouse and some excellent mosaics. To the west, in the vetus urbs, you might also check out a restored Roman theater.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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  • vicky_cannae's Profile Photo

    ItálicaItálica, about 8km...

    by vicky_cannae Written Aug 24, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Itálica
    Itálica, about 8km (5mi) northwest of Seville, on the northwest edge of the small town of Santiponce, was the first Roman town in Spain. Most of the Roman vetus urbs (old town) is now buried beneath Santiponce, but visitors can wander partly reconstructed ruins in the nova urbs (new town), which was added by emperor Hadrian, successor to Trajan. The ruins include one of the biggest Roman amphitheaters, the Termas Mayores public bathhouse and some excellent mosaics. To the west, in the vetus urbs, you might also check out a restored Roman theater.

    Monasterio de San Isidoro del Campo
    At the south end of Santiponce, on Avenida de San Isidoro, this monastery was once one of the most cosmopolitan centers of learning during Spain's golden era. Monks here finished the first translation of the Bible into Spanish, but the community was dissolved by the Inquisition after the cunning linguists developed Lutheran ideas while reading too many dangerous foreign books. The Claustro de los Muertos (Cloister of the Dead), in Renaissance style, is one of the finest repositories in all of Andalucía, and the chruch's main retablo (altarpiece) is one of the masterpieces of Juan Martínez Montañés, who also carved the effigies on the tomb of the founder, Guzmán El Bueno, and his wife.

    Carmona
    In the rolling hills 38km (23.6mi) east of Seville in the fertile La Campiña region, Carmona has a long, well-fortified history. As early as the 8th century BC, the gravity of its strategic position was understood all too well by both the irrepressible Romans and those cagey Carthaginians. The Muslims further fortified the town in the first half of the 13th century, but ultimately fell to a fellow named Fernando, who in turn turned Carmona's main alcázar (fortress) into his personal pad. The remaining mudéjar and Christian places of worship were added frosting on the cake, well after the fighting had simmered down.

    The typical tour of old Carmona takes in the eerie Necrópolis Romana (Roman Cemetery); the impressive old town gate, the Puerta de Sevilla, and the adjacent Alcázar with impressive upstairs views; a quick look-see of the ancient Muslim walls; and a roundabout wander up Calle Prim toward the colorful 16th-century Plaza de San Francisco (aka Plaza Mayor).

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  • The roman city of Italica was...

    by Raffa Written Aug 24, 2002

    0.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The roman city of Italica was founded in 205 A.D. by Publio Cornelio Scipio the African during the war against Cartago (2nd. Punica war). Its great archeological importance is given due to its excellent preservation. An outstanding contribution is the brick and sand amphitheatre, its construction began in the first year of the Christian era and finished in the epoch of Trajano and Adriano, natives of this hispanic-roman city. Also there are numerous mythological mosaics of grat interest, the remains of thermal establishments, the theatre and clasical sculptures which are preserved in the museum at the entrance of the archeological site.
    Visiting times:
    Tuesdays to Suaturdays (9:00 to 20:00)
    Sundays (9:00 to 15:00)
    Mondays closed.
    Entrance fee: 2 euros.
    Free for E.C. members.
    Av.Extremadura,2 (Santiponce) 95/5996583
    It´s 5 kms away from Sevilla.

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