Alcazar, Sevilla

4.5 out of 5 stars 4.5 Stars - 129 Reviews

Plaza del Triunfo 95 450 23 23

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Alcazar
    by littleman
  • Alcazar
    by littleman
  • Alcazar
    by littleman
  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Triumph square

    by solopes Updated Feb 23, 2014
    Seville - Spain
    2 more images

    Surrounded by the cathedral, the Alcazar and the Royal Archives of India, this wide square is the main hub of all touristy movements in Seville.

    It has an image of the Virgin in the centre, but its name comes from a small monument close to the archives.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • littleman's Profile Photo

    Alcazar 1

    by littleman Written Sep 14, 2013
    4 more images

    To some this is the major attraction in Sevilla.A series of palace buildings built over many years under different influences.I would recommend taking a least half a day to see this complex and gardens.Take some food and drink,find a quite spot in the gardens and enjoy the oasis.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • spanishguy's Profile Photo

    Royal Fortress - Reales Alcázares

    by spanishguy Updated Aug 25, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Lion gate by night
    4 more images

    Finally we are on the third UNESCO building in Sevilla, the Real Alcázar, the oldest Royal Palace used in Europe, because it still being the official residence of the Spanish Royal Family in Seville.

    Noteworthy as it is it not only a singular palace but a series of palaces, the product of successive reforms that took place since the Arab occupation. Thus these grounds bring together a perfect symbiosis, a succession of architectural styles, from Islamic to Neoclassical, incorporating Mudejar elements, Gothic, Renaissance, Plateresque, Purist, Baroque and Rococo; all contributing to the magnificence of this landmark. They are present at its beautiful gardens, patios, rooms and tapestries.

    It's really advisable a visit to the Alcázar, and also I could advice you to take an audioguide to understand better the history and unique art of this building.

    Visiting hours during the day

    From October until March 9:30 - 17:00
    From April until September 9:30 - 19:00

    Price / Precio: 8'75 €
    Retired and students from 17 to 25: 2 €
    Sevillians, disabled and children under 16: Free entrance

    Free entrance for regular public 18:00 - 19:00 (April - September) and 16:00 - 17:00 (October - March)

    Link to the next tip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Maymuna's Profile Photo

    Absolutely Amazing

    by Maymuna Written Apr 6, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The Real Alcázar was the first sight I visited in Seville, and definitely the most impressive. As a former student of Islamic Studies I was especially intrigued by the Arab-influenced parts of the building, and I was not disappointed by the incredible details in the architecture and the calligraphy. To me the entire Alcázar is proof of the beauty that can come out of mixing and combining different cultural influences. In fact, its beauty almost moved me to tears.
    The gardens are spectacular, and even in March, when it is not too warm, you can appreciate how the natural "air conditioning" must work wonders in the heat of summer.
    Maybe, in a way, it was a mistake to see this first, because nothing else could come close to the beauty of the Real Alcázar.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • GentleSpirit's Profile Photo

    Real Alcazar

    by GentleSpirit Updated Feb 22, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The Alcazar of Seville was originally a fortress built by the Moors as early as 913. Over time it has been adapted as a residential palace by the various rulers that have lived here and the roles and functions that these rulers have carried out. Even today it is considered the oldest active palace in Europe.

    Originally, Seville played second fiddle to Cordoba, the center of the Moorish state in Spain. Later though, Seville became the main city under the Moslems. In 1254 Alfonso of Castille (the Wise) ordered construction of a gothic palace. In the 1300's Pedro (the Cruel) had the palace expanded in the Mudejar style, using Moslem artisans from Seville, Cordoba and Granada. Remember of course that Seville became the center of the Spanish empire following the discovery and colonization of the Americas, and with that came the dramatic expansion in wealth, and consequent expansion of the palace as well. Interestingly, the only major addition the Habsburgs made was the beautiful gardens.

    Even today the upper floors are reserved for the use of the Royal Family and are to be made available to them whenever they are in town. I was visiting on one of those days and I guess due to security the hours were limited.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • TooTallFinn24's Profile Photo

    Alcazar: King Cruel's Palace

    by TooTallFinn24 Updated May 28, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dolls Head in Patio de las Munecas
    3 more images

    The most spectacular wing of the Alcazar is King Pedro the Cruel's Palace. The palace is designed in a striking combination Moorish and Renaissance style. Work on this area of the Alcazar began in 1364 when King Pedro called on his friend Mohammed V from Granada and indicated his intent to rebuild this portion of the Alcazar. Mohammed, who was responsible for much of the detailed work at the Alhambra, provided Don Pedro with artisans from Granada, Seville and Toledo to help create what King Pedro was looking for. He wanted the palace designed as the place for him and his mistress to live after he abandoned his wife to live in this section of the Alcazar.

    According to scholars this palace is considered Spain's best example of the Mudejar style. Several of the rooms are intricately designed from tiled ceilings to beautiful walls and ceilings.

    King Pedro wanted the redesigned palace to have both private and public quarters. At the center of the public quarters is the Patio de las Munecas (Courtyard of the Dolls). The doll's head in my first photo seems to be crying for attention. Wondering what motivated the designer to create this image? Walking around this area provided us with stunning glimpses of detailed Moorish decoration and plasterwork. This courtyard was altered significantly in the 19th century to meet the needs of the ruling monarch at that time.

    The most striking public area of the King's Palace is the Patio de la Doncellas (Courtyard of the Maidens). The most jaw dropping portions of this area are the beautiful arches and detailed plaster work. According to the Lonely Planet's, Andalucia, a sunken garden was discovered in this area in 2004 by a team of archaeologists. This courtyard was altered significantly in the 19th century to meet the needs of the ruling monarch at that time.

    Walking this area reminded me of the Alhambra of course but somehow there was a feeling of sadness as I walked through some of the palace rooms.

    Was this review helpful?

  • TooTallFinn24's Profile Photo

    Royal Alcazar: Visiting and Enjoying

    by TooTallFinn24 Written May 27, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kings Palace Front Facade
    3 more images

    The Alcazar is well worth spending a couple of hours visiting. While some may argue that is not as spectacular as the Alhambra and Mezquita it is a beautiful site that has rich architectural detail.

    I have broken down my trip to the Alcazar into five different pages; this introduction, the Admiral's Apartments, the King's Palace, Gothic Wing, and the Gardens.

    The Alcazar was constructed beginning in the 11th century on the oldest archaeological remains in what was once part of the Islamic town. Over the ensuing 900 plus years portions of the Alcazar have been transformed into nearly every architectural style imaginable as different owners have gone for a style that they felt best both represented and met their needs. Portions of the Alcazar have been constructed in Baroque, Neo-Classical, Gothic, Renaissance, Mannerist, Taifa, Almohal, and Mudejar styles. Many of those architectural patterns are still represented their today. It makes for striking contrasts and what remains today represents a blending of styles over that 900 plus year period.

    We chose to visit the Alcazar on a Sunday afternoon. There was a line but it moved quickly and within twenty minutes we were let inside. The cost of tickets has recently risen to 8 euros a person although seniors above age 65 or members of the European Economic Community are given reduced rates.

    The Alcazar is open from 9:30 to 19:00 daily between April and September and the rest of the year is open from 9:30 to 17:00.

    Was this review helpful?

  • TooTallFinn24's Profile Photo

    Alcazar: Gardens

    by TooTallFinn24 Updated May 27, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Jardin del Estanque
    4 more images

    The gardens at the Alcazar provide a welcome relief from the intimate details and darkness of the Palace and Admiral's Apartments.

    One of the more interesting garden areas is the Jardín del Estanque . This in area of a large pool and a detailed wall with arches. This garden was named after thereservoir which formed the basis for the pool, a cistern which once collected water for the palace and for irrigation.

    Coming out of the main palace area, there are a series of linked gardens called the Jardin de la Danza (Gardens of the Dance). These are more formal gardens each with a general theme. There are beautiful ceramic tile benches that have been well kept up that provide a glimpse of the Moorish workmanship.

    There is also a small maze garden which was very popular with children and their families.

    Was this review helpful?

  • TooTallFinn24's Profile Photo

    Alcazar: Admiral's Apartments

    by TooTallFinn24 Updated May 26, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    The first of the four main areas of the Alcazar we visited was the Admiral's Apartments.

    This was the room of the Alcazar that Queen Isabella used in the early 1500's to administer Spain's New World discoveries. It was also the room that she met with Christopher Columbus in after one of his voyages.

    The rooms are not as spectacular as the other portions of the Alcazar and contain a series of coats of arms, and several paintings. The most spectacular of the paintings is the Santa Maria de los Navegantes (St. Mary of the Navigators- See Photo 1 here). It was painted by Alejo Fernandez. The Virgin was the patron saint of the navigators. On the left hand side of the painting there is a rare portrait of King Ferdinand.

    In another room of the Admiral's Apartments there is also a scale model of the Santa Maria one of Columbus's ships. It was the only one of Columbus's ships to sink in the discovery of the New World.

    2nd & 4 photo courtesy mary ann sullivan b.u.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Robmj's Profile Photo

    Reales Alcazares

    by Robmj Written May 5, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Seville's Alcazar
    4 more images

    Seville's Reales Alcazares is the city's main example of non-religious architecture.

    The Alcazar has been the home of Muslim and Christian royalty for many centuries which means it has a real mismatch of styles which adds to its fascination.

    Entrance is through the Leon Gate, or Puerta Del Leon which is set below 3 magnificent watchtowers. Noteworthy is the Maiden's Court which is a great example of Mudejar courts in Spanish architecture. The most important rooms are the Ambassadors' Hall and the bedroom of the Moorish Kings. The gardens are well worth spending time in, they are a mix of Arab, Mudejar and Renaissance design with glorious fountains and spouts.

    Also of note, is the General Archives of the Indies (the exchange). This dates from the 16th century and contains the most important documents concerning the discovery and conquest of the Americas.

    The whole thing will take hours to explore and you will leave amazed by the grand architectures, designs and lavish interiors of many of the rooms. In my opinion it easily rivals the Alhambra in Granada. Come and see for yourself.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • stevemt's Profile Photo

    The Alcazares is not to be missed

    by stevemt Written Oct 22, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The palace is one of the best remaining examples of mudéjar architecture. Well worth a look.

    The royal family still use the upper floors as their official Seville Residence.

    The gardens here are wonderful as well.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • A piece of heaven on earth :)

    by Giedreb Updated Jun 22, 2011
    4 more images

    I've travelled to Seville in the end of January, 2008. This time of year we have very cold, freezing days in Lithuania, but what I experience in the Alcazar is hard to describe in words. Some places of that palace looked like they were a very successful work of an artist - old moorish architecture, water fountains and the beauty of southern nature (palm trees, orange, tangerine and lemon trees, flowers) left a very strong impression on me.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Photography
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • unaS's Profile Photo

    Reales Alcazares

    by unaS Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Entry + fortifications
    4 more images

    The Alcazar is the ancient Royal Palace of the rulers of Spain since the Roman era, approximately 913. It is still in use today when the King visits Seville.

    Beautifully carved inside with magnificent ceramic tiles it is also a fortress, forming part the ancient city walls. Excellent Mudejar architecture from some of the older renovations required following earthquakes.
    Strongly reminiscent of Al Hambra.

    A visit here can take a couple of hours at least. Very worthwhile taking time to visit all of the rooms and the gardens with their lovely fountains.
    If they are open (depends on if in use by the Royal family) do visit the Royal Apartments.
    Fabulous - even worth the extra payment for the guided tour.

    See map and description here: http://www.sevillaonline.es/english/seville-city-centre/alcazar-palace.htm

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Seniors
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • tini58de's Profile Photo

    The Alcazar

    by tini58de Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The Alcazar is a royal palace originally built as a Moorish fort and later enlarged by the Christian kings. The Alcazar is part of the UNESCO World Heritage site of Sevilla, mainly as it is one of the best examples of mudéjar architecture, a style applied under Christian rule in Spain but using Islamic architectural influence.

    There are various palaces (both mudejar style and gothic style) and some fantastic gardens!

    Entrance fee is 7 € (2008) and be sure to bring plenty of time!!!

    Was this review helpful?

  • eden_teuling's Profile Photo

    REAL ALCAZAR DE SEVILLA.....

    by eden_teuling Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    REAL ALCAZAR DE SEVILLE....

    At the Plaza del Triunfo is the entrance to the ROYAL ALCAZAR and.....take care that you have plenty of time because this is a huge complex of interesting buildings and gardens....

    This place is one of the oldest royal residences in Europe!

    This same location has been occupied by e series of defferent buildings, such as a Roman Acropolis, a Paleochristian Basilica, a Moorish Castle and the first Moorish Fortress of the 9th Century.
    Pedro I built the MUDEJAR PALACE, a mixture of Gothic elements with MUDEJAR plaster and coffer work.

    Especially interesting are:

    the patio de la Monteria (Hunting Patio)
    the patio de las Doncellas (Maidens Patio)
    the patio Salon de los Embajadores (Embassador's Hall with its huge golden cupola of the mid 15th Century.

    Next to the Mudejar Palace stands the Palace of Carlos V, adjacent to the Jardines del Alcazar (the gardens).

    When you have enjoyed it all, including the thousands of doves living there!, you leave the Alcazar into the Patio de Banderas (Patio of the Flags).

    There is a nice cafee / restaurant where you can sit down for a while after walking through the gardens.....

    For more photographs: go to my TRAVELOGUE.....

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Sevilla

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

63 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Alcazar
3.5 out of 5 stars
108 Opinions
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
452 Opinions
0.2 miles away
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
54 Opinions
0.2 miles away
Show Prices

View all Sevilla hotels