Archivo de Indias, Sevilla

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  • Archivo de Indias
    by littleman
  • Archivo de Indias
    by littleman
  • Archivo de Indias
    by littleman
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    Archivo de Indias

    by littleman Written Sep 10, 2013
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    Free entry into this world heritage listed building which was used to house the history/archives of the exploration of the new world.Not much to see inside except they have a small theatre showing the history of the building and Sevilla, which was very informative and worth viewing.

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    Archive of the Indies

    by spanishguy Updated Aug 25, 2013

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    Archivo de Indias - Main Fa��ade
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    The "Archivo de Indias" is another building listed on the UNESCO World Heritage, thanks to its building, but mainly for the importance history of its archives.

    The King Charles III, in the 18th century, decided to keep together all the documents to the New World, the Spanish territory in America and Asia, founding the Archive as a central institution. These archives are among the most important in the world in terms of volume and information to understand the history of the world international trade, as long as the history of the former Spanish Empire. One of the most important document is the Christopher Columbus' diary.

    The building itself comes from the 16th century made in Renaissance style, created by the King Phillip II to be a market and lately, the Seville Academy of Fine Arts with the presidency shared by artists like Murillo and Herrera el Mozo, and later by Juan Valdés Leal.

    It's possible to visit the building and also to check some of the documents on digital format currently.

    Opening hours

    Monday to Saturday 9:00 - 16:00
    Sundays and holidays 10:00 - 14:00

    Free entrance

    Link to the next tip

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    Archivo General de Indias

    by ELear Updated Apr 29, 2010

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    There's hugely important material kept here – an original of the Treaty of Tordesillas, for example, and I believe (although I didn’t see it) the journal of Christopher Columbus (who is buried in the cathedral) – but I didn’t find it as visitor-friendly as I’d expected. When I went, there was a thing (mainly explanatory wall-panels) about pirates (Drake, Hawkins, Raleigh, Morgan, Blackbeard,. Captain Kidd, almost all Brits), which I found interesting, but even with that I think children might get bored quite quickly. The opening hours ware a bit odd, I remember.

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    Archivo de Indias

    by Redang Updated Jan 14, 2009

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    Archivo de Indias (Sevilla, Spain)

    Built in 1.572, it was used to be the Mercaderes Market; they used the Cathedral terrace before. In the 18th century, King Carlos III decided to gather together all the documents related to the New World and created the Archivo de Indias (Indian Archive).

    - Fax: (+34) 954 21 94 85

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    Archivo General de Indias

    by tini58de Updated Oct 5, 2008

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    This place was the biggest surprise for us: still blinded by the slendor of the the Cathedral and the Giralda, we thought that this rather bare building on the other side of the square was just "boring"! What we did not realize was that it is a UNESCO World Heritage Site!!! And for a good reason!

    It is here in this 16th century building that all information regarding the overseas empire has been collected since 1785!

    You can visit the General Archives - free entry, only your bags will be X-rayed.

    When we visited they had this fantastic exhibition of the discovery and development of North America with fascinating maps, sketches and books!

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    Outside the Archivo

    by bliss7 Updated Feb 10, 2007

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    Frankly, I was a little disappointed. You walk in, through a short corridor, and get to see some cool maps and reproductions of letters, and read some interesting stuff. But that was really it... I had expected some giant museum open to the public. The security there is very friendly and it's also air-conditioned. Well worth a visit if you're strolling by the Cathedral, but I think people who are not into history will be bored out of their minds. There is a pretty garden area outside it, also.

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    Archivo de Indias

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written May 16, 2006

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    Sevilla - Archivo de Indias

    The rectangular two-storeyed building with small towers on corners is named Casa Lonja. It was constructed in 1584-1598 by architect H. de Errera. Originally the building was used as a stock exchange. All the commercial transactions with America were made there. Carlos III opened in a former stock exchange "Archive of Indias " (Archivo de Indias). This archive functions till now. The extensive collection of documents (more than 44 thousand), devoted to discovery of West-India is collected there.

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    Plaza del Triunfo

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated May 16, 2006

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    Sevilla - Plaza del Triunfo

    The central square of Seville is Plaza del Triunfo. Facades of three basic sights of Seville come on this square: Casa Lonja, Archivo de Indias and Catedral de Santa Maria. The column in honour of rescue of the city at earthquake 1755 is installed in the centre of the square.

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    Archivo de Indias

    by Carmela71 Updated Nov 10, 2003

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    Archivo de Indias from Patio de Banderas

    The Archivo de Indias (Archive of the lndies) is just next to the cathedral at the avenida Constitucion.

    On August 2003 was on renovation, but while touring around Sevilla we meet a guy from Texas, that told us, that the actual information of the Archives is just in the house in front until they finish the renovations.

    He was here in some kind of grant, and he was really enjoying Sevilla.

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    Archivo de Indias

    by Beach_dog Updated Nov 7, 2003

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    Archivo de Indias

    The archives hold all the records of the time when Spain was involved with it's South American Empire. The UNESCO Comittee named the Cathedral, the Alcazar and the Archivo de Indias as world heritages because of their testimony to the civilization of Christian Andalusia.

    It has held records since 1785 and has documents dating back to 1492.

    While I was there the Archives were closed for renovations and not open to the public.

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    Archivo de Indias

    by GeoDenia Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Since 1785, this building on the west side of Plaza del Triunfo has been the main archive of Spain's American empire. Its endless shelves hold more than 80 million pages of documents dating from 1492 through to the end of the empire in the 19th century. Most of the archive can only be consulted with special permission, but there are rotating displays of fascinating maps and documents, often including manuscripts penned by Columbus or Cervantes or conquistadors such as Cortés or Pizarro.

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    Archive of the Indies

    by Jim_Eliason Written Jul 12, 2005

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    Archivo de Indios

    In this building are stored all the records of the Spanish voyages to the New World including Columbus's journal.

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