Cathedral, Sevilla

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Avenida de la Constitución 95 421 49 71

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    by draguza
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    by shavy
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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Pateo de los Naranjos

    by solopes Updated Feb 20, 2014

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    Seville - Spain

    VThe only things that remain from the mosque built in the 12th century and replaced by the cathedral are the tower - Giralda - and the adjacent cloister, called Pateo de los Naranjos because it is all planted with orange trees.
    The Muslim origins can be clearly seen in one of its doors, called Puerta del Perdon.

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    Large and rich

    by solopes Updated Feb 17, 2014

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    Seville - Spain
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    This perfect example of Gothic architecture, enriched with the Muslim tower of Giralda and "pateos", it's a cool place in the furnace of Seville, with lots of treasures to justify a long and relaxing visit, with special evidence to Colon's tomb.

    Built in the beginning of the 15th century, it is the third largest church in the world, and so beautiful that I must not waste your time describing some of the beauties that you need to discover locally by yourself, with the help of a good guide.

    However, if it means nothing to you there's another reason to approach it - It is also the central place from where horse ridden carts depart, covering the touristy area in the easiest way to do it.

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    Catedral de Sevilla

    by ValbyDK Written Sep 20, 2013

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    Catedral de Sevilla
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    The Cathedral of Saint Mary of the See (Spanish: Catedral de Santa María de la Sede) was built in the 15th and 16th century on the site of a former major Arab mosque. It is a HUGE Roman Catholic cathedral, actually the largest Gothic cathedral and the third-largest cathedral in the World!

    The interior is very impressive and has many interesting details. The central nave (the longest in Spain) rises to 42 meters, 80 chapels, the biggest altarpiece (30 meters high and 20 meters wide) in Spain, some tombs (including the supposed Tomb of Christopher Columbus), 15th century stained-glass windows, and much more.

    One of the absolute highlights is the Giralda Tower, which was the minaret of the original Arab mosque. The minaret was 76 meters high, but a Christian belfry was added in 1568 and now the Giralda Tower is 105 meters high. Quite a walk to reach the top, but from there is a great view of Sevilla.

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    Oranges courtyard - Patio de los Naranjos

    by spanishguy Updated Aug 24, 2013

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    North fa��ade from Patio de los Naranjos
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    During the Moorish occupation, the Arabs built their main mosque on the grounds where a church was placed. After the reconquest made by Ferdinand III, the Christians built this cathedral on the mosque place, but respecting some parts of this building.

    The Oranges Courtyard is one of this parts remaining from the Ben Basso's mosque. It was built in the 12th century by the Almohad. Like in all the mosques it was used as anteroom for the mandatory muslim ablutions before entering the praying room.

    Currently we join the courtyard by the Gate of Forgiveness where there are some Catholic images. It is said that Saint Peter's one, on the right, has got three hands and if you find out all of them you'll get married!

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    Christopher Columbus grave

    by spanishguy Updated Aug 24, 2013

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    Columbus grave - Tumba de Col��n
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    This funeral monument keeps the remains of the discover Christopher Columbus. His grave is supported by four figures representing soldiers of the four former Spanish kingdoms (Castile, Leon, Aragon and Navarre). It's placed at the left side of the High Altar and it will be the first sight you'll see if you enter for the tourist tour.

    Some years ago the truthfulness of this fact has been proved by DNA exams. Finally we know that the real Columbus is in Seville and in the Dominican Republic too, so his body is in both continents!

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    The Cathedral's Monstrance

    by spanishguy Updated Aug 24, 2013

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    Cathedral's Monstrance
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    At the right of the Main Altar you can see the Monstrance, where the Host is exposed to the faithful. It's a very big chapel depicting a giant Monstrance like the regular ones in any other Catholic church for adoration of the Host.

    This main picture was taken after the Holy Thursday's Mass, while the Cardinal Amigo was about to put the Host there.

    In the other pictures I display the other Monstrance, mainly the most famous one. It's the one for procession of the Holy Host during Corpus Christie day, made by the famous sculptor Juan de Arfe. This procession is very popular in Seville and we're one of the few cities to keep it during its traditional day, on Thursday, while the rest of the cities moved the Corpus Christie celebrations to the next Sunday.

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    High Altar and vault

    by spanishguy Updated Aug 24, 2013

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    High Altar
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    Inside the cathedral we can see beautiful works of art. In the High Altar is the greater altarpiece, considered one of the largest in the world with 27 metres high 18 metres wide. The altar is protected by an impressive golden fence.

    To be honest what I don't really like about this Cathedral is the small space for people that can be housed in the main altar. In spite of been the largest Cathedral after Saint Peter, the room for people to attend the Holy Mass is so tiny because the Main Altar and the Chorus are so close.

    The H.M. the King Juan Carlos's elder daughter, Infanta Elena, got married here in 1995.

    The Gothic central vault above this part has 37 meters high. You can see in the second picture the back side of the choir and one of the organs.

    Mass schedule

    Weekdays 10:00
    Sundays and holidays 10:00, 11:00, 12:00, 13:00

    Link to the next tip: The Cathedral's Monstrance

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    Virgen de los Reyes Chapel

    by spanishguy Updated Aug 24, 2013

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    Plaza Virgen de los Reyes by night
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    One of the most important part of the Cathedral for the locals are the one not open for tourism, but just for worship. For sure, you're welcome to enter if you are Catholic and want to have a moment of pray inside, but please don't be too obvious taking pictures in front of everybody.

    This is the Royal Chapel, placed on the Cathedral's apse, housing the Virgen de los Reyes (Virgin of the Kings), a 13th century image and patroness of the city. The name of "Royal" come because there is also on this chapel the body of the King Ferdinand III in an urn of silverware. He was the conqueror of the city against the Arabs and its body is said to be incorrupt and he is Saint for the Catholic Church.

    Mass schedules

    Weekdays 8:30, 10:00 (s), 12:00 (s), 12:30 (w), 17:00 (w)
    Vespers 17:00 (w)
    Sundays and holidays 8:30, 10:00 (s), 17:00 (w), 18:00 (w)

    Link to the next tip: Main Altar in the Cathedral

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    Cathedral and Giralda

    by spanishguy Updated Aug 24, 2013

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    Cathedral's East fa��ade with Giralda tower
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    Since its construction, the Cathedral of Seville holds the title of Magna Hispalensis, not only for being one of the greatest Gothic building to ever exist, but also for being one of the most colossal of Christendom. It went declared a national monument in 1928 and granted World Heritage status by UNESCO in 1987. It also has the Guinness Record of the biggest Catholic Cathedral in the world (after Saint Peter in the Vatican)

    You can't miss the visit to our main spot in town, full of history and art, but mainly of devotion. Keep in mind that Seville keeps to be a traditional city, attached to its roots and Catholic religion is very popular among the citizens. During the Holy Week (Easter) the Cofradías (Brotherhoods) with a figure of Jesus Christ and the Holy Virgin pass thru the Cathedral during its expiatory parade from its temple.

    Visiting hours

    Winter time
    Mondays 11:00 - 15:30 (16:30 - 18:00, free visit with audioguide booking by mail one week in advance)
    Tuesdays to Saturdays 11:00 - 17:00
    Sundays 14:30 - 18:00

    Summer time (July and August)
    Mondays 9:30 - 14:30 (15:30 - 17:00, free visit with audioguide booking by mail one week in advance)
    Tuesdays to Saturdays 9:30 - 16:00
    Sundays 14:30 - 18:00

    Price: 8€
    Students and retired: 3€
    Sevillians, unemployed, children and disabled: Free

    Link to the next tip: Virgen de los Reyes chapel in the Cathedral

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  • draguza's Profile Photo

    CATEDRAL

    by draguza Written Jul 1, 2013

    It took almost 400 years to build Spain's largest church and the third biggest in the Christian world. Standing on the site of what was Seville's main mosque, one can still see elements of the Mudéjar style of art and late Gothic style architecture. Work began in the early 15th century, and by the time it was finished, it had five naves with a floor space measuring 116m x 76m. There is an astounding number of fine paintings and sculpture inside like Christopher Columbus' tomb

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  • shavy's Profile Photo

    Cathedral

    by shavy Updated Jun 29, 2013
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    The Cathedral of Seville is a Gothic building in the Spanish city, and is the main church of the Archdiocese, you'll also find the famous Giralda, the former minaret today is the bell tower of the Gothic of this Cathedral

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    Third-Largest Church in the World

    by Maymuna Written Apr 6, 2013

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    The Cathedral is a really impressive building. It is built in Gothic style (a favorite of mine) and the third-largest church in the world. It has a beautiful orange courtyard, you can climb the tower, there are some lovely windows, a lot of beautiful relics, and you can see the tomb of Christopher Columbus.

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    Puerta del Perdon (Door of Foregiveness)

    by GentleSpirit Updated Feb 22, 2013

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    This door gives access to the Patio de los Naranjos (the orange trees). As such, its not really a door to the Cathedral at all. This gate is part of the original mosque structure. As you can see in the picture the original decoration is retained. Of course, the statues of the saints were added later and are the work of Bartolome Lopez, done in 1522.

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    Cathedral of Seville

    by GentleSpirit Updated Feb 22, 2013

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    Cathedral of Seville
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    The Cathedral of Seville is gigantic. If you have been to Spain you are no stranger to seeing large Cathedrals with elaborate ornamentation. The Cathedral of Seville (Catedral de Santa Maria de la Sede) is the largest Gothic church in the world and overall the third largest church in the world.

    Before the Reconquista in 1248, what is now the Cathedral was the grand mosque. Today's belltower, the Giralda, was once the minaret for that mosque. The Cathedral itself was built in 1401 following a major earthquake that made the use of the existing structure too dangerous.

    In some ways the Cathedral seems to have been snakebitten. Only a few years after completion of the structure, in 1506 the dome collapsed. Again it collapsed in 1888. Makes you wonder, doesn't it?

    All in all though, The Cathedral of Seville is an amazing place. The interiors are somewhat dark so your photos may not come out too well. You have to look up and see the ceiling and the designs, it really is quite amazing. Off to one side, you will see the remains of Christopher Columbus. What is imposing about this Cathedral is its architecture, its enormous. That being so you don't get the same play of the light on the stained glass windows that you would get in a smaller place (like St Vitus in Prague, for example). Still, you should bear in mind that from the very beginning, the intent was to build one of the largest churches in Christendom.

    Definitely see it, it's superb!

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    Patio de los Naranjos

    by GentleSpirit Updated Sep 19, 2012

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    Patio de los Naranjos
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    The Patio de los Naranjos (Courtyard of the orange trees) is the area just outside the actual Cathedral. As this was once a mosque, the function this patio once served was that of a place where worshipers could wash their feet before going in to pray. This under the sweet smell of orange trees.

    Today it is a calm place, a good place to prepare yourself for a hike up to the top of the Giralda or a lot of walking around. The day I was there was really quiet, it was a beautiful little refuge from the hustle and bustle

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