Cathedral, Sevilla

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Avenida de la Constitución 95 421 49 71

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  • Mahieu's Profile Photo

    The Cathedral

    by Mahieu Written Apr 10, 2004

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    Lots and lots of people of course, especially on a Sunday, when entrance is free!
    The Cathedral is built on the place of the ancient mosque, that was demolished once the Christian kings took over Sevilla. It is one of the biggest Cathedrals in the world. Once inside, you are astonished by the amount of space.
    The most beautiful piece inside is the Capilla Mayor. You can also find the tomb of Christopher Colomb.

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    The Hollow Mountain

    by agarcia Updated May 7, 2004

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    Some organs are bigger than others...

    Even though it sounds quite a bit as a location in the Middle Earth, Sevilla's Cathedral is often referred as La Montaña Hueca (the hollow mountain) as its proportions are simply mind-blowing. The legend affirms that its designers wanted to build a church so huge that others to come would believe they were crazy. Personally, don't think they were crazy at all, as they efforts developed into the third largest temple of the Christian world, and an authentic money maker for the city (entrance to the cathedral including visit to La Giralda, costs 6 euros). Those guys were not crazy....if anything, they were a bit too high with Manzanilla. ;-)

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  • tompt's Profile Photo

    Cathedral

    by tompt Updated Feb 28, 2004

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    cathedral by night, Sevilla,Spain

    The cathedral in Sevilla is built on the place where used to be a mosque. This mosque was built between 1184 and 1198 when the arabs ruled this area. Later the christians took over and changed the mosque into a christian cathedral. Around 1400 the mosque was ruined and had to be torn down.
    In 1401 the church leaders decided: Let us build a church so big that those who see it will think we are mad. The church was built on the site of the torn down mosque. Some parts of the mosque were saved with the Giralda tower being integrated in the church. (see next tip for more)
    It is one of the last Spanish Gothic cathedrals, with the Renaissance style already there. It is the third largest cathedral in the Christian world, after Saint Peter's in Vatican and Saint Paul's in London. The total building surface is 23,500 square meters.

    The cathedral can be visited from monday to saturday between 11:00 and 17:00.
    On sunday entrance is free from 14:00 to 18:00.
    We visited before 11:00 on a saturday though. There were services going on. But if you keep quiet and don't take pictures of the services it is OK.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Cathedral interiors

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written May 16, 2006

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    Sevilla - Cathedral interiors

    The interior of the cathedral is typical for Gothic buildings. The central part - a Royal Chapel (Capilla Real) is constructed in the style of Renaissance. The massive lattice closes to retablo which is the biggest in the world. The altar has images with figures of hundreds Sacred and Apostles. They are made from the gilt tree. The altar was created by Flemish and Spanish masters in 1462-1564. There is the statue of Santa Maria la Sede - patronesses of a cathedral in the front of the altar.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Sepulcro de Cristobal Colon

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written May 16, 2006

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    Sevilla - Sepulcro de Cristobal Colon

    Hristofor Columbus's tomb (Sepulcro de Cristobal Colon) is situated near southern doors of the Cathedral. The magnificent sarcophagus is supported with statues of four heralds. They symbolize four kingdoms - Castile, Leon, Aragon and Navarra. The tomb appeared here in 1902. However till now there is no confidence that ashes of the discoverer of America lays in Seville.
    Columbus died in 1506 in Seville. The urn with ashes according to his will was sent to the Cathedral of Santo-Domingo in the capital of Dominican republic and buried there. In XVIII century the urn got to Cuba. In 100 years the urn appeared in Seville.

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  • Redang's Profile Photo

    Catedral/Cathedral (1/11)

    by Redang Updated Jan 11, 2009

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    Cathedral (Sevilla, Spain)
    4 more images

    The Cathedral of Sevilla stands on the site of the 12th century Great Mosque of which only the minaret (La Giralda) has come down to us today. It was converted into a Christian church when the city was conquered by Fernando III of Castile in 1.248.

    Since its construction, the Cathedral of Seville holds the title of Magna Hispalensis, not only for being one of the greatest Gothic building to ever exist, but also for being one of the most colossal of Christendom.

    It was declared a national monument in 1928 and granted World Heritage status by UNESCO in 1987.

    The dimensions of this cathedral make it the third largest church in the world after Saint Peter (Vatican City) and Saint Paul (London, U.K.).

    Pics (all five show the main façade):
    - Main, second and third: Main entrance.
    - Fourth: Puerta del Baptisterio.
    - Fifth: Puerta del Naciemiento (de San Miguel).

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  • mcbeal_ally's Profile Photo

    Cathedral

    by mcbeal_ally Updated Apr 13, 2007

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    It is the largest of all Roman Catholic cathedrals (Saint Peter's Basilica not being a cathedral) and also the largest Medieval Gothic religious building, in terms of both area and volume. It is 76 by 115 meters, and was built to cover the land previously occupied by the Almohad Mosque. Its central nave rises to an awesome 42 metres and even the side chapels seem tall enough to contain an ordinary church. Its main altarpiece is considered the largest in the Christian world.

    The Cathedral also has a large collection of religious jewelry items, paintings and sculptures, along with the tomb of Christopher Columbus.

    Timetables: July and August, 9.30 am-4 pm. Rest of year, Monday-Saturday, 11 am-5 pm. Sundays and public holidays, 2.30-6 pm.
    Closed: 1 and 6 January, 20 and 22 March, 26 May, 15 August, 8 and 25 December.

    Entry fee: Admission to Cathedral and Giralda only.
    General admission: €7.50
    Reduced: €2 (pensioners, unemployed persons, Seville residents and students, with ID).

    Free: Sundays, disabled persons, unemployed persons, children under 12 years and groups by prior appointment.

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  • Redang's Profile Photo

    Catedral/Cathedral (2/11)

    by Redang Updated Jan 11, 2009

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    Cathedral (Sevilla, Spain)
    4 more images

    The Cathedral has five naves (the main one of which stands 36 m tall) and a rectangular ground plan, measuring 116 m. long and 76 m. wide. The transept rises to a maximum height of 40 m.

    The last pic was taken through a mirror which is in the middle of the Cathedral used to appreciate much better and comfortably the vaults.

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  • Redang's Profile Photo

    Catedral/Cathedral (6/11)

    by Redang Written Jan 11, 2009

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    La Giralda (Sevilla, Spain)
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    La Giralda is probably the most important and famous icon of Sevilla. This tower is one of the few remains of the ancient Almohad mosque. It is considered to be the sister of the Kotobyya in Marrakech. With a height of 82 metres, it gives you great views of Sevilla.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Patio de los Naranjos

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written May 16, 2006

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    Sevilla - Patio de los Naranjos

    The Orange court yard (Patio de los Naranjos) has escaped from Arabian times up till now. In days of Al Mohad believers (faithful) made ablution before a pray there.
    The Gate of Absolution (Puerta del Perdon) are kept as well. Once it was an entrance in the mosque from Calle Almanes.

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  • unaS's Profile Photo

    The Seville Cathedral

    by unaS Updated Dec 9, 2009

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    Columbus's Tomb
    4 more images

    The earliest part of the Cathedral preserved is the Orange Tree Courtyard. It is the only part that survived the change from a Muslim Mosque to a Christian Cathedral (1181 - 1198). Consecrated as a Cathedral in 1218. Such a fantastic history here in Spain!

    These oranges are sour oranges still used today to make the marvelous Sevillian orange marmalade. According to the recorded guide they are also exported in large numbers to England for the same purpose.

    The Gothic section was completed in 1517.
    The Renaissance period saw renovations to the Royal Chapel and other parts of the Cathedral from 1558 - 1568.
    The Baroque era added the Parish Church and more capillas (chapels) from 1618 - 1758.
    Many of these chapels are beautiful. Worth spending some time walking around and reading the signs in front of them. The capilla Mayor is the largest in Spain.
    Modern times have added new main doors and the southwest corner.

    Because of the complexity of the structure that covers such a long period of time the AudoGuide is recommended. Cost in September 2009 was Euro 3.50. There are no numbers inside of the Cathedral but you get a map and a floor plan together with the audioguide so that it is easy enough to follow.

    You can enter the Giralda tower here too. It is a long steep climb up many ramps to the top - no I didn't do it :)

    Christopher Columbus's tomb is here although it is said that only half his body resides in it. The other half is supposed to be somewhere in South America.

    Visits permitted Monday to Friday, in winter from 11 am to 5 pm; in summer from 9.30 am to 4 pm.
    Those interested may attend Mass.

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    The Cathedral ( 2 photos)

    by nicolaitan Written Mar 5, 2006

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    1 more image

    Originally the site of a Visigoth church, the great cathedral was built to replace the 12th century high mosque of the Moorish rulers. Only the Giralda minaret was retained, converted to a belltower by adding an upper level. The reconstruction spanned a century, finished in 1506. It is the third largest cathedral in the world, and the largest in the Gothic style. Besides the vast chapel, it contains in the treasury works by Murillo and Ribero as well as one of several tombs scattered in western Europe stated to contain the earthly remains of Christopher Columbus. The altarpiece is one of the largest and richest in the world, containing 45 carved scenes from the life of Christ and containing huge amounts of gold.

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  • andal13's Profile Photo

    Patio de los Naranjos

    by andal13 Written Oct 25, 2003

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    Orange-trees Courtyard

    Sevilla's Cathedral is one of the most awesome religious buildings of Spain; its history, its magnificent architecture, its museum, make it peculiarly interesting. But nothing compares with the charming Patio de los Naranjos (Orange-Trees Courtyard)... Just there, among Gothic constructions, dozen of orange-trees... A party to the senses!

    La Catedral de Sevilla es uno de los edificios religiosos más impresionantes de España; su historia, su magnífica arquitectura, su museo, la hacen particularmente interesante. Pero nada se compara con el encantador Patio de los Naranjos... Allí, en medio de las construcciones góticas, docenas de naranjos... ¡Una fiesta para los sentidos!

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    Puerta del Perdon (Door of Foregiveness)

    by GentleSpirit Updated Feb 22, 2013

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    1 more image

    This door gives access to the Patio de los Naranjos (the orange trees). As such, its not really a door to the Cathedral at all. This gate is part of the original mosque structure. As you can see in the picture the original decoration is retained. Of course, the statues of the saints were added later and are the work of Bartolome Lopez, done in 1522.

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    Patio de los Naranjos

    by GentleSpirit Updated Sep 19, 2012

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    Patio de los Naranjos
    1 more image

    The Patio de los Naranjos (Courtyard of the orange trees) is the area just outside the actual Cathedral. As this was once a mosque, the function this patio once served was that of a place where worshipers could wash their feet before going in to pray. This under the sweet smell of orange trees.

    Today it is a calm place, a good place to prepare yourself for a hike up to the top of the Giralda or a lot of walking around. The day I was there was really quiet, it was a beautiful little refuge from the hustle and bustle

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