Fábrica Real de Tabaccos, Sevilla

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c/ San Fernando 95 455 10 00

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  • Fábrica Real de Tabaccos
    by Aitana
  • Fábrica Real de Tabaccos
    by tini58de
  • Fábrica Real de Tabaccos
    by tini58de
  • spanishguy's Profile Photo

    Inside Faculty of Law -Interior F. Derecho

    by spanishguy Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Marquis of Santaella sculpture - Escultura Marqu��s
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    I specially like the University building because I studied Law in such a beautiful place. I lived very good moments here because I did excellent friends and I met my girlfriend. The University of Seville was founded in 1505 by the Marquis of Santaella, so last year it celebrated its 500th anniversary. By the way the Faculty of Law proceed from the 18th century. All the building has marble floors, artistic vaults and big wooden doors which are valued of more than 6000 euros each one! Nowadays the University of Seville is chosen by a lot of European students thanks to the Erasmus program (the European Union university exchange program). In addition it's one of the most popular Spanish University among American students.

    El edificio de la Universidad me gusta especialmente ya que estudié Derecho en este lugar tan bonito. Viví momentos muy buenos aquí porque hice excelentes amigos y conocí a mi novia. La Universidad de Sevilla fue fundada en 1505 por el Marqués de Santaella, así que el año pasado celebró su 500 aniversario. Por su parte la Facultad de Derecho procede del siglo XVIII. Todo el edificio tiene suelos de marmol bóvedas artisticas y grandes puertas de madera ¡valoradas en más de 6000 euros cada una! Hoy en día la Universidad de Sevilla es elegida por muchos estudiantes europeos gracias al programa Erasmus (el programa de intercambio de estudiantes universitarios de la Unión Europea). Además es una de las Universidades españolas más populares entre estudiantes estadounidenses.

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    Fábrica de Tabacos

    by Aitana Written Dec 11, 2010

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    The Spanish encountered the tobacco plant almost immediately upon their first arrival in the Americas in 1492. The city of Seville, home to the Casa de Contratación (The House of Trade), held a monopoly on commerce with the Americas. At the beginning of the 16th century the first tobacco manufacturers established themselves in Seville, the first anywhere in Europe. Initially, they were dispersed through the city, but were eventually concentrated in one place—facing the Church of Saint Peter—for sanitary reasons and to facilitate state control of the activity.

    In the 18th century, the royal government decided to build the present large building immediately outside the city walls. This was the largest factory built in Europe in that period.

    Now it is the seat of the University of Seville.

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  • tini58de's Profile Photo

    The Old Tobacco Factory

    by tini58de Updated Oct 5, 2008

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    What is now part of the Universidad de Sevilla, used to be the Old Tobacco Factory, a cornerstone of the city's economy. This place was built in the middle of the 18th century (1750 - 1766), and 100 years later it employed 10,000 cigarreras, of which "Carmen" was one! In the 19th century, these tobacco women made up the largest female workforce in Spain.

    The building is quite impressive: it occupies the largest area of any building in Spain except El Escorial, the great palace-monastery near Madrid. At one stage the tobacco factory had stables for 400 mules, its own jail and even a nursery (most of the workers were women).

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    University of Seville

    by sandysmith Updated May 27, 2006

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    university portal entrance
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    The University of Seville (since 1929) was the former old tobacco factory which became world-famous for its role in the opera Carmen. Its a huge complex but take special note of its portal, with sculpture works of Cayetano de Acosta and the chapel "Hermandad de los Estudiantes", with a Jesus Christ of Juan de Mesa. You can walk through this entrance pass an inner courtyard and exit to the road the other side. Opposite the university are several bars frequented by the students - these are cheaper places to get a drink!

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  • spanishguy's Profile Photo

    University - Universidad

    by spanishguy Updated Feb 17, 2006

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    Faculty of law - Facultad de Derecho
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    Some university faculties were moved here in 1949. This resulted in various alterations indoor, which still remain today. Originaly there were three faculties: Law, Sciences, and Philosophy and Literature. Nowadays it still being the Faculty of Law (one of the best in Spain), Geography and History, and Spanish, Classic, English, French and German Philology. Since becoming a university seat, the building houses the chapel of la Hermandad de los Estudiantes (Student Brotherhood) containing a beautiful image of the Christ of the Good Death- a work of art by Juan de Mesa, created in 1620.

    Algunas facultades universitarias se trasladaron aquí en 1949. Esto provocó varias reformas en su interior que son las que continuan en la actualidad. Originalmente había tres facultades: Derecho, Ciencias y Filosofía y Letras. En la actualidad continúa estando la Facultad de Derecho (una de las mejores de España), Geografía e Historia y Filología Española, Clásica, Inglesa, Francesa y Alemana. Desde que es sede de la universidad, en el se ubica la capilla de la Hermandad de los Estudiantes, con una bella imagen del Cristo de la Buena Muerte obra de Juan de Mesa realizada en 1620.

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  • spanishguy's Profile Photo

    Royal Tobacco Factory - Fábrica de Tabacos

    by spanishguy Updated Feb 17, 2006

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    Main entrance - Entrada principal
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    Chewing, inhaling and smoking tobacco had all become fashionable in the 18th. In order to meet such a demand for these various products, a big tobacco factory was built. The works began in 1728 and they were finished in 1771. Finally it's the second larguest building in Spain (after San Lorenzo del Escorial, in Madrid) mixing the industrial nucleus with lots of palatial elements such its façades, lobbies, stairways and lounges. In addition it had a courthouse, a jail and administration buildings. Its capacity was astounding: a human contingent of thousands of workers, the majority of whom were women, immense workshops and warehouses, 24 courtyards, 21 fountains, 10 wells for cleaning the factory; 116 grinding mills, 40 reviewing mills and 87 pens and stables to keep the nearly 400 animals used for the milling. This public building was devised as a type of citadel: it had a chapel, sentry boxes, drawbridges and a moat. In this building began the myth of the cigar maker "Carmen", who inspired the Bizet's opera.

    Mascar, aspirar o fumar tabaco estaba de moda en el siglo XVIII. Para satisfacer esta demanda se construyó una gran fábrica de tabaco. Las obras comenzaron en 1728 y terminaron en 1771. Finalmente, resultó ser el segundo edificio más grande de España (tras San Lerenzo del Escorial, en Madrid) mezclando con el núcleo industrial numerosos elementos palaciegos, como sus fachadas, vestíbulos, escaleras y salones. Además tenía un juzgado, una cárcel y casas de administración. Su capacidad era sorprendente: un contingente humano de miles de obreros, en su mayoría mujeres; inmensos talleres y almacenes, aireados por 24 patios, 21 fuentes y 10 pozos para la limpieza de la fábrica; 116 molinos de “desmonte”, 40 de repaso y 87 cuadras y caballerizas para guardar los casi 400 animales encargados de efectuar la molienda. Este edificio público, fue ideado como una ciudadela, pues tenía capillas, garitas, puentes levadizos y foso. En este edificio comenzó el mito de "Carmen", que inspiró la ópera de Bizet.

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    tobacco factory

    by Arimateia Updated Jul 4, 2005

    Of all the booming industries of 18th Century Spain none can be compared to that of tobacco. Chewing, inhaling and smoking tobacco had all become fashionable. In order to meet such a demand for these various products, the existing tobacco factory since 1610 in Plaza del Cristo de Burgos was replaced by one which nobody, at its time, could ever have imagined.

    Work on his building began in 1728, following the project of the military engineer Ignacio Sala. Work was halted in 1731 and recommenced in 1750under the direction of Sebastián Van der Bocht who added to the industrial nucleus various palatial elements such as the façade, the vestibule, stairways and lounges.

    Other Sevillian craftsmen also took part in this work.

    The monumental factory was completely finished in 1771 (sic), including the Courthouse, jail and administration buildings. Its capacity was somewhat astounding: a human contingent of thousands of workers, he majority of whom from the 19th century onwards were women, immense workshops and warehouses, aired by 24 courtyards, 21 fountains; 10 wells for cleaning the factory; 116 grinding mills, 40 reviewing mills and 87 pens and stables to keep the nearly 400 animals used for the milling.

    This public building was devised as a type of citadel: it had a chapel, sentry boxes, drawbridges and a moat.

    This company, apart from being the largest employer of the female population of 19th century Seville, also spearheaded the world-wide projection of the myth of las cigarreras (cigar makers).

    In 1949 the installation of the various faculties of the University of Seville in this building was finally approved. This resulted in various alterations in the interior, which still remain today much to the delight of those who visit. Since becoming a university seat, the building houses the chapel of la Hermandad de los Estudiantes (Student Fraternity) containing a beautiful image of Cristo de la Buena Muerte - a work of art by Juan de Mesa, created in 1620.

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  • Rafa73's Profile Photo

    Fabrica de Tabacos/University

    by Rafa73 Written Feb 9, 2005

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    Picture from the movie Carmen

    The world's biggest tobacco factory, the Royal Factory of Seville, was built in 1758 and not abandoned until the 1950s when it became home to the city's university.

    Seville became the centre of the tobacco trade in the 17th century after Spaniards and others found the indigenous Americans smoking the plant. In 1614 King Philip III decreed that all tobacco grown in the Spanish new world should be shipped to Seville. Cigarettes were reputedly invented by beggars using tobacco from cigar stubs.

    The thousands of feisty, independent-spirited female cigarette-rollers -the cigarreras - employed by Seville's factories in the 19th century inspired French composer Georges Bizet to write an opera based on one, Carmen.

    In Bizet's day more than 3,000 cigarreras , women with their own income and status, would sit in a room hand-rolling cigarettes. "The cigarreras , many of whom are great beauties, form a class by themselves, and unhappily are not noted for their chastity," the 19th-century writer Howe Downes reported.

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  • Rafa73's Profile Photo

    Real Fabrica de Tabacos/University

    by Rafa73 Written Feb 9, 2005

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    Main entrance

    HISTORICAL OUTLINE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SEVILLE
    The embryo of the current University of Seville was the School of Santa María of Jesus, founded by Archdeacon Maese Rodrigo Fernández de Santaella at the end of the fifteenth century.

    Then in the sixteenth century (1505), a papal bull from Pope Julius II granted the school the ability to grant degrees in theology, philosophy, law, medicine and art; and in 1551 the city council passed to Maese Rodrigo's foundation the royal provision that granted a `Estudio General', as a result of which it officially became a university, enjoying the same privileges as the other universities in the kingdom.

    From the statutes of 1621 it transpires that the University of Seville consisted of four faculties: Theology, Canons and Law, Medicine and Arts and awarded bachelors, graduate and doctorate degrees, as well as that of Master from the Arts Faculty.

    In the middle of the twentieth century the University of Seville moved to the `Real Fábrica de Tabacos' building, built by the engineer Van der Beer during the reign of Fernando VII.

    In the sixties The Technical Schools of Architecture and Industrial Engineering were created. In the following decade the studies of Economics and Pharmacy were introduced; the Faculty of Sciences was split up which led to the creation of the faculties of Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics and the Rábida University College was created.

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  • smschley's Profile Photo

    From tobacco factory to University

    by smschley Written Jan 15, 2005

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    In Carmen, Bizet has a scene where she is rolling the cigars on her thigh. The site was the Real Fabrica de Tobacos (Royal Tobacco Factory).

    The factory was built between 1750 and 1766 and employed some 3,000 cigarreras (female cigar makers) at its height (I guess no one wants to smoke a cigar rolled on some hairy guys leg).

    In 1950’s the building was converted to the Seville University and has lost all traces of its original use. Still, the building is truly gorgeous and worth a look.

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    Carmen and the University

    by Mahieu Written Apr 10, 2004

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    This is the old tabacco factory where lots of women used to make cigars. According to the legend, the famous Carmen used to work here too.
    Nowadays the building is part of the university, the faculty of Lettres and Philosophy.
    Don't hesitate to take a walk inside, no one will look strange upon you, even if you start taking pictures.
    I found it to be a very beautiful building. A university with patios: we don't have this in Belgium ;-)

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  • Carmela71's Profile Photo

    Tabacco Factory

    by Carmela71 Updated Nov 10, 2003

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    Tiles at the main wall

    The Tobacco Factory is actually the University of Seville, the building deserves a look as well.

    Well as far as I can see, many buildings there deserve a look lol

    This is famous as well by the Opera Carmen, where she used to work here while deciding between the soldier and the bullfighter

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  • Beach_dog's Profile Photo

    Tabacco Factory

    by Beach_dog Updated Nov 7, 2003

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    The Facede of the Tabacco factory.

    Famed for it's role in Prosper Merimée's Opera, 'Carmen'. Carmen was a worker in the Tabacco factory. It's not like any factory you would see these days, it's exterior is ornately decorated with sculptures. Since 1921 it has been used as part of the University of Sevilla.

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  • acemj's Profile Photo

    Universidad de Sevilla

    by acemj Updated Dec 21, 2002

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    Sevilla's university is housed in what used to be the Royal Tobacco Factory of Bizet's opera "Carmen" fame. I walked through the main entrance on Calle San Fernando into a few nice courtyards. All of the students were going about their day just like at any other university campus that I've visited and I had to wonder if they realize that not all college campuses are this beautiful.

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  • GeoDenia's Profile Photo

    Antigua Fábrica de Tabaccos

    by GeoDenia Written Feb 25, 2003

    South of the city center, this massive defunct tobacco factory rolled out the smooth smokes up until the mid-20th century. The factory was long a cornerstone of the city's economy, boasting it's own jail, stables for 400 mules and even a nursery, since most of the laborers were women. The 18th-century Neoclassical building is now a part of the Universidad de Sevilla, and is open to the public for a wander during daylight hours.

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