Fun things to do in Sevilla

  • Traditional dress, Sevilla, Spain
    Traditional dress, Sevilla, Spain
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    Plaza de España
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Sevilla

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    Noria Panorámica de Sevilla

    by bliss7 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Noria is a giant wheel, behind the Plaza de España, at the Prado de San Sebastian. There are air-conditioned booths on this wheel, you pay about 8 euro for a "ride." But it is not really a ride... you go around, reach an amazing height, and get to see the entire city from a bird's perspective. It is especially nice that the Plaza de España is right next to the Noria. There is also a great view of the Catedral, Giralda, y Alcazar. If you have time, definitely check this out. It can also be quite romantic, especially if you go at sunset, and the operators let you stay at the top for a bit. ;)

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    SANTA CRUZ....

    by eden_teuling Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Santa Cruz is what used to be THE JEWISH QUARTER of Seville and the area which is the most interesting, characteristic and atmospheric.

    It is here where you will find the most important MUST SEEs such as the Cathedral, El Alcazar and the GIRALDA.

    It was also here that my hotel was situated: see TIPS and in the photograph you see the steps that lead to my room: it used to be an old mansion and still has its wonderful characteristics such as e.g. the stairways / steps: full of colourful AZULEJOS WHICH IS SO LOVELY!

    I PREFER THIS HOTEL TO A MODERN ONE!

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    BULL FIGHTS IN SEVILLE....

    by eden_teuling Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    There is a wonderful ARENA for bull fights in Seville and to see more photos of it (I had a guided tour) go to my TRAVELOGUES.....

    I once was in SEVILLE when the FERIA THE ABRIL started with special bull fights.

    I didn't go there because after having seen 1 bull fight in Spain I didn't feel like watching one again!!

    Who is interested: the tourist office has a program with all the days that bull fights will be held, you just have to ask for it......

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    HORSE AND CARRIAGE.....

    by eden_teuling Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Isn't it always a pleasure to go sightseeing by horse and carriage??

    They are anxiously waiting for you to make you enjoy SEVILLE...

    You can find these carriages in several places e.g. on the PLAZA in front of the CATEDRAL and in the PARQUE DE LUISA near the river Guadalquivir........

    Let your eyes feast on SEVILLE.....

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    THE ROYAL MONASTERY OF SANTA PAULA....

    by eden_teuling Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The entrance of thos Royal Monastery of the nuns of the Hieronymian Order opens onto the Calle Santa Paula 11. It was not really easy to find the entrance and the street.

    (You have to knock hard on the door and after some time a very old, short nun will answer the door by opening a minute window in the door and ask what you want....after that she will open up and show you the stairway that leads to the museum and another, very kind nun, will lead the way over the outer patio, the COMPàS...)

    Of course you will admire the façade of the church a work of excellent quality with angels, medallions and AZULEJOS....(tiles)

    The complex is surprisingly beautiful and dates back to appr. 1500 AD.

    The church here is rich as is the order just because they were always protected by the Christian Monarchs.

    The Museum possesses numerous pictorial works, sculptures and gold-work!

    DON'T FORGET TO VISIT the nuns' special room, their "shop" where they sell (as many Monasteries do....) sweet, special cookies, and all kinds of home-made jams.....I bought some apple/mint jam and cocos cookies which were delicious!

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    Sevilla, Spain

    by Danalia Updated Jan 11, 2011

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    Sevilla celebrates two important events: Semana Santa (Wholly Week)and two weeks later- 'La Feria de Abril', in which for one long week the celebrationare in an open square and including: music, dancing, concerts, eating and drinking.
    Also try the nightlifeof Sevilla , that as many of the Spanish people like to pass their time in the streets or in the local bars or cafeterias.

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    Puentes de Sevilla/Bridges of Seville (4/7)

    by Redang Updated Dec 17, 2010

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    Next bridge receives two names: Puente del Cristo de la Expiración or the Cachorro (the Puppy). This bridge resolves communication with Triana, while also being the natural exit towards the province of Huelva.

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    Iglesia de San Luis

    by MM212 Updated Oct 21, 2010

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    Completed in 1731, la Iglesia de San Luis is one of the few churches in Seville not to have been built on the site of a mosque. It is thus completely devoid of mudéjar elements, and is considered the prime example of barroco sevillano architecture, the rich Baroque style associated with the city. The church was originally built for the Jesuits and was named Iglesia de San Luis de los Franceses (Église Saint-Louis des Français), but the Jesuits were expelled from Spain in 1767 and thus abandoned the church.

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    City tours - bus and river

    by ELear Updated Apr 29, 2010

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    One good thing about getting a “hop-on, hop-off” city bus tour of Seville is that you get to see impressive things that otherwise you wouldn’t see because they’re too far from the centre (where the tour bus can’t go anyway). I’m thinking particularly of the Expo 92 site, especially the STUNNING Alamillo Bridge. You can get on at the Torre de Oro. If you just stay on the bus a complete tour takes about an hour and a half.

    You can also get a river cruise from the Torre de Oro, which makes for a fun three quarters of an hour. They go as far as the Barqueta Bridge in one direction and the 1929 World Fair Argentine pavilion in the other.

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    Casa de la Memoria de Al-Andalus

    by unaS Updated Dec 8, 2009

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    A lovely small house in Santa Cruz it is today a cultural center used for traditional flamenco shows, concerts and exhibitions. Not a restaurant; no drinks or food served. It is a museum of Old Sefarad and connected with the Casa de Sefarad in Cordoba.

    Every evening there is a show in a cozy, intimate patio (open in the summer) beautifully decorated in the old style. There is a tiny stage with informal seating on folding chairs. There are 3 rows of chairs surrounding the stage in a semi-circle so everyone is up close. The shows emphasize young people especially noted for their abilities. It was mesmerizing. The dance, the music, the atmosphere were totally different than your typical tourist show. The dancer's hearts were in their work. The musicians very, very good indeed.

    There is a very bold notice that no photography is permitted, so I didn't bring my camera...then at the end they did allow a 10 minute photography opportunity. Ooofff!

    Good idea to buy your tickets a day or two in advance. They fill up fast - and the tickets are a lot less expensive than the average flamenco show held for tourists in restaurants. Seats are not reserved so get there good and early for the best spots.

    Euro 15 for adult ticket in September, 2009. Discount for students.
    Not easy to find. See instructions below and the photos.

    Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y_2Sd7amd-w

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    Casa Manuel Nogueira

    by MM212 Updated Nov 19, 2009

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    Built in 1907, la Casa Manuel Nogueira is a prime example of neomudéjar architecture in Seville. Its architect, Aníbal González, is one of Seville's most famous, best known for Plaza de España, the magnificent semicircular buildings, and el Pabellón Mudéjar, now housing el Museo de Artes y Costumbres Populares. He is known for his ability to master several styles from Mudéjar Revival, to Modernista. Casa Manuel Nogueira, though, was a smaller residential project, but one that was most faithful to Mudéjar architecture. The use of multi-lobed and horseshoe arches is reminiscent of la Mezquita of Córdoba.

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    As time passes...

    by unaS Updated Nov 13, 2009

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    It is worth walking down to Plaza Nuevo for many reasons. One of the most interesting is the Ayuntamiento (Town Hall) - Begun in 1527, and enlarged during the 19th century, the changes in its construction are fascinating.

    To see its most interesting facade, turn east when you reach it; then flank the building's eastern edge for a view of the medallions and allegorical figures that kept teams of stonemasons busy for generations. But as you walk along you see the designs getting less and less until on the most recent wing there are simply blank walls with no decoration at all...

    Seems that all of the carving work there was done in situ. Such skilled stonemasons slowly disappeared. The cost of employing the few that were left became insupportable for the city government.

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    Activities

    by markymark218 Written Apr 19, 2009

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    Visit www.guiasandalucia.com for a run-down on activities and courses in Seville. There's also a bunch of stuff for Granada, Cordoba, Jerez, and Cadiz. We did a Segway tour and it was awesome, definitely a head-turner!

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    Murilla Botanical Gardens

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Apr 7, 2009

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    As much as we tried, we could not break through into Real Alcazar but, after walking along its garden walls on Calejon del Agua we emerged onto a wide pedestrian walkway called Paseo de Catalina Ribera. This was where we finally had our chance to enjoy some foliage, in the public Murilla Botanical Gardens!

    It was originally part of the Alcazar as well, but in 1911 it was ceded to the city of Sevilla by King Alfonso XIII for the use of the city's citizens. The public walkway took us down along one edge of the Gardens with the wall of the Alcazar (on the left here) marking the demarcation line between the two gardens. We enjoyed the sights of the beautiful tall Palm trees growing beside some of the attractive Spanish-style buildings in this part of Sevilla, but my favourite was the huge tree (I think maybe a Fig tree?) in the 3rd and 4th photos!

    Shortly after we finished our walk through the Gardens, we had completed our entire circle of the Alcazar, so gave up on that and decided that we would head across the Guadalquivir River to see what Sevilla looked like from there.

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    Sunday before Christmas

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Apr 7, 2009

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    It was late afternoon (with the light just beginning to fade) on Sunday, December 21 when we finished with the check-in arrangements at our hostel, and decided to make our first exploratory walk into the surrounding area of Sevilla. We had a small street map, but had no idea of where we were actually going - just following the stream of people who were out enjoying the evening, as we worked our way out of the narrow Moorish alleys into 'broader' streets and squares.

    Sevilla was alive with families and pedestrians of all kinds and Christmas decorations were starting to light up the scene. However, the crowds eventually became so thick that we decided to head back to our hostel but, before doing that, I just had to take this shot of a beautiful palm tree sticking up out of Plaza Nuevo! On our way back, we stumbled across another of Sevilla's many plazas - this time it was Plaza del Salvador, the site of the city's second largest church (2nd photo).

    With construction completed in 1712, Iglesia del Salvador is superceded in size only by the Cathedral and was built on the site of a Moorish mosque that had deteriorated over the many decades since the conquest. The Gothic architecture of this building was meant to make it look much more impressive than the previous tenant using this lot!

    I am not sure exactly what was going on, but many Sevilla families were lining up in the plaza in front of Iglesia del Salvador as they sought entrance to what looked like another twin-spired church on the other side of the plaza. It turned out to be the 'Hospital de Nuestra Señora de la Paz' which was formerly a large 16th century church now flanked by two 18th century bell-towers. I still don't know what the line-up was about!

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