Getting Around Sevilla

  • Sevilla
    Sevilla
    by lotharscheer
  • Sevilla
    Sevilla
    by lotharscheer
  • Sevilla
    Sevilla
    by lotharscheer

Most Viewed Transportation in Sevilla

  • Windsurf's Profile Photo

    Parking in Sevilla

    by Windsurf Written Sep 15, 2006

    When parking there, don't forget to leave your car in "Neutral". The locals tend to play "Bumper cars" to create space for their own vehicle. Wierd, yet harmless, couse all cars stay parked in "N" and sometimes more than five cars get moved at the same time.

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    GUADALQUIVIR BOAT TOURS

    by LoriPori Written Feb 27, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A relaxing way to see Seville along the Gualquivir River is to take a one-hour panoramic cruise with the GUADALQUIVIR BOAT TOURS. Daily departures every 30 minutes from the "Torre del Oro" dock ( Estacion Maritima ) in the city center. Full guided cruises on modern and comfortable boats.
    Some of the people on our bus tour took the cruise. Our guide said it was 15 Euros or 12 Euros group rate.

    Guadalquivir Boat Tours
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    • Family Travel

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    SEVILLA TOUR

    by LoriPori Written Feb 27, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    For a fun way to get around Sevilla, why not try the SEVILLA TOUR. You have your choice of 3 different vehicles - Double-decker bus / Tramway and air-conditioned Generation Bus. Your ticket is valid for 24 hours and you can Hop on / Hop off at 4 different Bus Stops: 1) Torre del Oro 2) Plaza de Espana 3) Isla Magica and 4) Monastery de la Cartuja

    Sevilla Tour
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  • meaganelizabeth's Profile Photo

    Eurorail- Barcelona to Selville

    by meaganelizabeth Updated Nov 2, 2005

    If you are coming from or to Barcelona from Selville, the Eurorail is great. Per person it is 100 dollars one way for an overnight coach private car. The ride was about 8 hours, and comfortable enough. There were bunk beds in the room, and windows. This was a nice experience. Train trips can be a nice experience, a different way to see things, and less expensive.

    Related to:
    • Study Abroad
    • Trains
    • Budget Travel

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  • Driving in Sevilla is HELL

    by surf_grrl Written Oct 10, 2005

    OK. First of all, if you are from North America, driving in European cities can be hell, period. You know how we are used to intersections in which the streets are clearly signed (and sometimes even signed well before you get to the intersection)? Not done. Signs are writ (engraved, actually) in teeny, tiny letters on teeny, tiny signs high up on the sides of buildings, if there happen to be any buildings nearby. You may or may not be able to see them (with binoculars) as you whizz by. And you know how we have lanes painted on the road, and how people actually abide by them? Likewise not done. There may be 5 cars flanked across a 3-lane traffic circle.

    Athough we had coped in Barcelona, Granada, and any number of small towns, Sevilla defeated us. We had an address, a map, and a plan. The traffic was not a problem (husband driver is from NZ, where they are more laissez-faire in their approach to traffic than we are here in North America). However, the above-mentioned lack of signage, combined with the features noted below, contributed to our Sevillian traffic implosion.

    (1) You may have a plan, but the streets you planned to take may,
    (a) become one-way halfway along
    (b) be too narrow to actually drive on
    (c) change name when the road makes a 2-degree change of direction, and said name-change may not appear on your map
    (d) be closed to all but taxis and taxis, or may become so halfway along
    (e) may be obstructed by any number of obstacles such as horse-and-carriages, construction, parked giant trucks...

    (2) You may in desperation choose to follow posted signs to a hotel or to the city centre, but said signs will undoubtedly disappear halfway along your route, leaving you utterly lost.

    We ended up getting a taxi to guide us to our hotel.

    Driving in Spain

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  • Driving in Sevilla is HELL

    by surf_grrl Written Oct 10, 2005

    OK. First of all, if you are from North America, driving in European cities can be hell, period. You know how we are used to intersections in which the streets are clearly signed (and sometimes even signed well before you get to the intersection)? Not done. Signs are writ (engraved, actually) in teeny, tiny letters on teeny, tiny signs high up on the sides of buildings, if there happen to be any buildings nearby. You may or may not be able to see them (with binoculars) as you whizz by. And you know how we have lanes painted on the road, and how people actually abide by them? Likewise not done. There may be 5 cars flanked across a 3-lane traffic circle.

    Athough we had coped in Barcelona, Granada, and any number of small towns, Sevilla defeated us. We had an address, a map, and a plan. The traffic was not a problem (husband driver is from NZ, where they are more laissez-faire in their approach to traffic than we are here in North America). However, the above-mentioned lack of signage, combined with the features noted below, contributed to our Sevillian traffic implosion.

    (1) You may have a plan, but the streets you planned to take may,
    (a) become one-way halfway along
    (b) be too narrow to actually drive on
    (c) change name when the road makes a 2-degree change of direction, and said name-change may not appear on your map
    (d) be closed to all but taxis and taxis, or may become so halfway along
    (e) may be obstructed by any number of obstacles such as horse-and-carriages, construction, parked giant trucks...

    (2) You may in desperation choose to follow posted signs to a hotel or to the city centre, but said signs will undoubtedly disappear halfway along your route, leaving you utterly lost.

    We ended up getting a taxi to guide us to our hotel.

    Driving in Spain
    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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  • Canuck5's Profile Photo

    Double-decker tour bus around Seville

    by Canuck5 Updated Jul 24, 2005

    Without a doubt, one of the best ways to see Seville is to buy a ticket for one of the double-decker tour bus operations.

    The bus tour travels by many of the sights to be seen around Seville, and your ticket allows you to get on and off at designated stops along the way. You can get off at any of the stops, so that you can spend more time in that area, or grab lunch, then hop back on the next tour bus that comes along to continue on your route.

    While on the bus, there is a recorded narrative you can listen to with packaged headphones, that describes what you are seeing.

    You can easily spend a whole day taking one of these bus tours, hopping on and off along the route. A great way to see this otherwise traffic-jammed city. I highly recommend it.

    Check with your hotel desk for details, but the UK website below will give you some info on it.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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  • jujub's Profile Photo

    Bus vs. Train

    by jujub Updated Jul 18, 2004

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I did not buy a rail pass, for various reasons: (1) wasn't going to travel extensively throughout Europe, (2) vacation time too short, (3) budget.

    So, I hopped on buses. I only took the train once, because, well, I had to see what train travel was all about. ;) The buses weren't bad at all, very comfortable, I even took an overnight bus from Madrid to Barcelona... it had some pit stops, but in all, I thought it was fine.

    I took the bus during day time going down to Sevilla from Alicante. The coast scenery is so pretty, I wish I had rented a car... =)

    Sevilla

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  • tompt's Profile Photo

    by plane

    by tompt Written Mar 9, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The airport of Seville is not very big. It only has 8 gates. But that is a big advantage. No long lines for example. And they do have many destinations in and outside of Spain. We flew Iberia, but had to transfer (in Barcelona or Madrid) to get in Amsterdam.

    In this picture we saw our plane coming in, it was about time to get out of this rain.........

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  • Carmela71's Profile Photo

    Arriving by car, or visitng other areas by car?

    by Carmela71 Updated Nov 10, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This are the main roads you may access... even if driving there is as in all big cities a nightmare lol

    Coming or going to

    Madrid and Cordoba Road N-IV (E5) .

    Huelva and Portugal Motorway A-49, also called ýV Centenarioý.

    Granada and Malaga Motoway A-92 Even this one takes you to Murcia where you join the E6 to Barcelona and Valencia

    Cadiz has two options but the toll one A4 is the one I recomend

    To go to Merida, Itlaica or to do the silver route the N-630, the old Výa de la Plata.... that goes till Castilla Leon and Galicia

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  • acemj's Profile Photo

    Float down the Rio Guadalquivir

    by acemj Updated Dec 22, 2002

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A great way to see the city and its bridges, is to take a river boat ride. Go to the wharf next to the Torre de Oro and you can take a one hour cruise in which tourist guides offer commentary in both English and Spanish.

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  • safardreams's Profile Photo

    Goodbye, Sevilla, Goodbye Spain!

    by safardreams Updated Jul 12, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Spain border. Avermonte, I think!!
    Maybe I'll see you again someday!
    Time to get back to Portugal!!

    The Border!

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  • Getting around with the tour bus

    by dtamas Written Oct 19, 2002

    These tour buses stop at the main sites, and once you've bought a ticket (costing 10 €) you can get on/off at any stop thorughout the day. An easy way to get around the city.

    Sevilla Tour Bus

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