Monasterio de San Juan de los Reyes, Toledo

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  • Cloister
    Cloister
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  • Monasterio de San Juan de los Reyes
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  • Mass at San Juan de los Reyes
    Mass at San Juan de los Reyes
    by Jefie
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    Monastery of San Juan de los Reyes

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jan 14, 2013

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    Cloister
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    This monastery was originally built by the Reyes Catolicos, who wanted to commemorate the Battle of Toro, which paved the way for the unification of Spain under one crown. Also it honored the birth of their son, Prince Juan.

    The monastery was completed in 1504 and was given to the Fransiscan friars. Damaged by Napoleon, restoration was not fully completed until 1967. The monastery was handed back to the Fransiscan Order in 1954 under the Franco regime.

    The architect was Hans Waas (Juan Guas), the son of a Flemish artist who had moved to Spain. Of course, you will remember that Carlos V, the first King of a united Spain, brought many Flemish artists and bureaucrats to Spain. Carlos has spent most of his life in the Low Countries and only lived in Spain a relatively short time. With that background, the architect combined many aspects of both styles of art into the Monastery. It mixes the Gothic, the Spanish Mudejar, and Flemish styles.

    The original plan was to house a dynastic mausoleum here for the family of Isabel la Catolica (Isabel of Castile) a plan which was later changed. Symbolically, Ferdinand and Isabella were buried in the Cathedral of Granada, the last Moslem city to fall to the Christians.

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    Monestario de San Juan de los Reyes

    by Jefie Updated Jul 31, 2008

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    Mass at San Juan de los Reyes
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    The rather imposing convent church of San Juan de los Reyes was commissioned by the Catholic King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella in 1476 to celebrate one of their victories in Portugal. Construction began the next year and it was completed in 1504. Although they ended up changing their mind, the King and Queen had initially meant for San Juan de los Reyes to become their final resting place, hence its superior elegance and beauty. Its architectural style presents a very interesting and unique blend of the Gothic and Mudejar styles, which has come to be known as "Isabelline Gothic". There was a service going on when we stopped by the church so we weren't really able to tour around, but then again we didn't have to pay for admission and I got to hear what a Catholic mass sounded like in Spanish... and it's surprinsingly similar to a French one!

    The Monestario de San Juan de los Reyes is open to visitors daily, from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm. Admission costs about 2 Euros.

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    Monasterio de San Juan de los Reyes (cont)

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written May 23, 2006

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    Toledo - Monasterio de San Juan de los Reyes

    The monastery was intended for a royal tomb. Therefore walls of the main monastic church are decorated by the arms and heraldic boards of kings. However Isabella and Ferdinand were buried in Granada.
    In 1808 French armies used a monastery as a barracks. The building was seriously damaged, but later it was restored.

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    Monasterio de San Juan de los Reyes

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written May 23, 2006

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    Toledo - Monasterio de San Juan de los Reyes

    Franciscan Monasterio de San Juan de los Reyes was founded by Isabella and Ferdinand in memory of the victory over Portugal in fight at Toro in 1476. The building of the monastery was constructed by architect H.Guas in 1492.

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    The Cloisters at San Juan de los Reyes

    by alucas Written Nov 13, 2004

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    San Juan de los Reyes - the cloisters

    The upper and lower cloisters have decorated tracery, and there are some amusing variations amongst the multitude of gargoyles.

    Like other VT visitors, I couldn’t resist taking lots of photos, and there is a selection in the travelogue.

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    San Juan de los Reyes

    by alucas Written Nov 13, 2004

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    San Juan de los Reyes

    The convent church of San Juan de los Reyes was founded in 1476 by Ferdinand and Isabel who intended it as their last resting-place. The surrender of Granada in 1492 was so important that they changed their burial plans, and the Capilla Real in Granada became their mausoleum. In the meantime Juan Guas had almost completed his masterpiece, the church at Toledo.

    There are four nave bays, but no side aisles, in common with other churches by Guas, and the crossing carries a lantern with windows. The piers are richly decorated with carved stone panels. The walls of the transepts each carry carved versions of the same coat of arms, Leon and Castile quartering Aragon, supported by eagles.

    Photography is not permitted in the church, but the custodian told us to go ahead, and only enforced the rules when a guided tour came in.

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    San Juan de los Reyes Monastery

    by pinik Written Aug 31, 2004

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    The monastery cloister

    San Juan de los Reyes Monastery: the church and 2 level cloister.
    The day we were there the church was decorated and prepaired to a wedding. Two women were rehearsing some wedding hymnus (one playing organ and another one singing), red strip of carpet was unrolled, guests were crowding near the monastery entrance.
    Then, the gallery. Couldn't stop myself to take more and more pictures with views through different windows and archs. Calmness and thoughtfulness.

    Church open: daily - 10:00 to 13:45 and 15:30 to 18:00 (summer until 18:45)

    Find some more pictures in my travelogue

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    San Juan de los Reyes Cloister

    by SirRichard Updated Jun 29, 2003

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    The gothic cloisters

    With the same ticket (1,5 euros) you can see both the church and the Cloisters.
    These are in gothic style, and have 2 levels. The pic you see is from the basement level. On the 1st floor you can admire a beautiful wooden ceiling too.
    Inside the patio, nice orange trees.

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    San Juan de los Reyes

    by acemj Updated Dec 13, 2002

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    This Gothic church was built by Ferdinand and Isabel to commemorate their victory at the Battle of Toro in 1476. It is mostly the work of the architect Juan Guas and has a gorgeous cloister (see travelogue).

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  • scybak's Profile Photo

    San Juan de los Reyes Church

    by scybak Written May 21, 2005

    This is a gothic style church originating from the 15th century. It has a Gothic cloister. The church is medium sized with only one aisle.

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    San Juan de los Reyes Monastery

    by SirRichard Updated Jun 29, 2003

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    The church

    This beautiful Monastery was built by the "Catholic Kings" (Isabel & Fernando) in the 15th century to commemorate the Toro Battle (1476).
    It has a nice church and a wonderful cloisters.

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