Astorga Things to Do

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    by globetrott
  • Things to Do
    by globetrott
  • Things to Do
    by globetrott

Most Recent Things to Do in Astorga

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    3 angles

    by globetrott Updated Nov 2, 2012

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    These 3 angles, that were planned for the interior of the episcopal palace of Astorga by Antonio Gaudi once, will be seen nowadays in the park around of the museum, so dont miss them, when you come out of the Museum!
    The episcopal palace was finished by another architect after the early death of Antonio Gaudi, who had most of his ideas in the head, but did not put them into the drawn plans.

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    Capilla de la Sta. Vera Cruz

    by globetrott Written Nov 2, 2012

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    Capilla de la Sta. Vera Cruz is a small chapel that I found at the other side of the old town of Astorga, but unfortunately the doors of it were closed. I really love such tiny churches with that typical churchtower that is just a wall that shows also the bells of the church. The chapel is dating back to the year 1816.
    There seems to be a monastery next to it as well.

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    the medieval townwalls

    by globetrott Updated Nov 2, 2012

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    In Astorgas you will be able to see some quite large remains of the medieval townwalls and they were also the first sight of Astorga that I saw, when getting out of the bus in the central busstation. the town seems to be built on a small hill, that was once totally surrounded by these walls and nowadays the citycentre is about 6 meters above the wall-grounds.
    Astorga was founded already in Roman times and has about 12.000 inhabitants nowadays.

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    a Roman villa & great mosaiques

    by globetrott Updated Nov 2, 2012

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    This was in fact a great surprise for me, while I was walking through Astorga: there are some great remains of a Roman villa, dating back to more than 2000 years.
    You will be able to see some great remains of excellent mosaiques. All of that is covered by a glass-roof and there is no need to pay an entrancefee or stick to opening-times.
    My last picture gives you an idea, what the villa might have looked like in the ancient times !
    Astorga has a Roman museum as well, BUT I did not go there !

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    the townhall and the chimes

    by globetrott Updated Nov 2, 2012

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    This is the townhall of Astorga and it dates back to the 17th century. There is a clock on the building and 2 puppets in the local traditional costumes of the Maragatos will hit the clock there each full hour. On this square there will be a market each tuesday morning, so maybe it is best to make you photos at another time.

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    The cathedral of Astorga

    by globetrott Written Nov 2, 2012

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    This is the cathedral Santa Maria of Astorga,and its origins are dating back to the 8th century. The cathedral is mostly a museum nowadays and you have to pay an entrancefee, you will get cheaper tickets for the combination of the Episcopal Palace and the cathedral.
    But lets first take a look at the richly decorated entrance-gate, that you will be able to see through the fence all day long. In the back of the roof of the cathedral you will see a pilgrim / peregrino. - my last picture.

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    "Museo de los Caminos" in Gaudi's Palace

    by globetrott Updated Nov 2, 2012

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    Take a look inside of Gaudi's Palace, that was once planed to be the episcopal palace and you will see a great Art Nouveau Interior with lots of mosaiques, paintings and sculptures about the Camino.
    The only place in the "Museo de los Caminos", where you are allowed to take photos is the entrancehall, where I have taken all of these photos.
    This museum is always closed on Mondays !
    The museum is open for visitors: From September 20th till March 19th:
    Tuesdays till Saturdays: 11.00am - 02.00pm and 04.00-06.00pm
    And Sundays: 11.00am - 02.00pm
    --- --- ---
    From March 20th till Sept 19th:
    Tuesdays till Saturdays: 10.00am - 02.00pm and 04.00-08.00pm
    And Sundays: 10.00am - 02.00pm

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    The episcopal Palace built by Gaudi

    by globetrott Updated Nov 2, 2012

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    This is the famous Episcopal Palace built by Antonio Gaudi between 1889 and 1913 for the local bishop, who actually did not like this palace and so he stayed in another building closeby and this building was finally transferred into a museum called "Museo de los Caminos"
    From OUTside the building looks a bit strange maybe, but make sure you will also see the interior with some excellent frescos, lots of paintings, mosaiques and other decorations in Art Nouveau Style.
    Photography is forbidden inside that museum unfortunately !
    &
    This palace is always closed on Mondays !

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    My Camino in 1999

    by Ewilly Updated Jul 20, 2012

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    In August 1999 I started my Camino in Astorga because I wanted to get to Santiago within 14 days. 3 days it was raining, the rest was fine, but in July and August are the hottest months and also the most peregrinos. So it was not easy to find a place to sleep, 2 times I had to sleep outside, but it was OK !

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    Astorga - Plaza Mayor and surroundings

    by pfsmalo Updated Nov 5, 2008

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    As is general in Spain the Plaza Mayor is also home to the town hall. This town hall is unique in having two Maragatos, known as Juan Zancuda and Colasa striking the time, and this since 1748. The building is just over 300 years old.

    Other things to do :

    The Roman museum : The Ergastula is situated 2 mins walk from the town hall on plaza de San Bartholomé and is an ancient slaves prison. A short film gives you an idea of the times when Astorga was known as Asturica Augusta. The museum in itself on the first floor. It is open every day of the year except the days around Xmas and the New Year.

    The Chocolate museum : Personally I found the museum a drag, no-one to explain anything, although there were some explanations on the walls. Even the girl who was supposed to be giving out samples seemed asleep with boredom. It is situated on C./ Juan Maria Goy, also a couple of mins from the town hall.
    These two museums can be coupled in one ticket bought at the information office.

    The tiny chapel of Santa Vera Cruz dates from 1816 and is at the side od Saint Francis' church, just past the Plaza Romana.

    Ayuntamiento (town hall) of Astorga Juan Zancuda and Colasa on the town hall. Tiny chapel of Santa Vera Cruz.

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    Astorga - The Romans.

    by pfsmalo Written Nov 5, 2008

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    Besides the Roman museum there is evidence of the Romans all over Astorga. The only part of the original wall visible from outside, along with a Roman gate along behind the Bishops Palace. The rest of the wall is of course original but covered and re-faced. In the calle Luis Braille there are some diggings going on and there is also the Plaza Romana where you can see some lovely mosaics including one known as "the dancing bear".

    Mosaic of the Another part of the flooring. Delicate tresses. The diggings : calle Luis Braille. More diggings.

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    Astorga - The Cathedral.

    by pfsmalo Written Nov 4, 2008

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    This striking gothic cathedral was begun in 1471 on the site of a Romanesque predecessor and finally finished in the 1700's undergoing additions in Neo-classic, Baroque and Renaissance styles.
    The small church of Santa Marta is in the shadow of the cathedral. Martha being the patron saint of Astorga.

    The caramel coloured facade. The cathedral and Santa Marta. C./ Leopoldo Canero towards the cathedral. Iglesia de Santa Marta. The pilgrim Santiago on the roof....

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    Astorga - the Bishops Palace.

    by pfsmalo Written Nov 4, 2008

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    The palace was begun in 1889 and finally deemed to be finished in 1913, although work actually carried on right into the 1960's. The attics were not finished according to Gaudi's plans, and that is why the three angels are actually exposed in the garden instead of inside. It is said the the Bishop never actually lived here and it is now a museum "Museo de los caminos", and holds a permanent exhibition dedicated to pilgrimages to Santiago.

    Gaudi's Bishops Palace. The entrance to the museum. From the roman walls behind the palace. The three angels.

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    Gaudí's Episcopal Palace

    by raquelitalarga Updated Sep 27, 2008

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    There are only three Gaudí building outside Barcelona and Astorga has one of them! It was shut on the Monday I was there and I'm sure the inside is more quirky than the exteriior which isn't particluarly mad.
    It now houses the Museo de Los Caminos. 2.50euros to enter or get a combined ticket for Museo Catedralicio fo 4 euros.

    Entrance Cathedral in background
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    Astorga cathedral

    by milugares Updated Dec 13, 2003

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    The impressive building is a sign of the importance of the city as religious centre.

    The facade is a master piece, with fine sculptures in every arch and column.

    The inside is also richly decorated: the altar, the choir, organ...

    Fachada de la catedral
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