Segovia Things to Do

  • songs from 19th century!
    songs from 19th century!
    by mindcrime
  • Things to Do
    by Cristian_Uluru
  • Things to Do
    by Cristian_Uluru

Most Recent Things to Do in Segovia

  • breughel's Profile Photo

    The church of San Andrés.

    by breughel Written Feb 8, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When walking from the Cathedral towards the Alcazar you can not miss the gardens of the Plaza de la Merced and another typical Romanesque church San Andrés from the 12th c.
    Special of this church are the two apses. Above the three naves rises a slender brick Mudejar tower with three stores.
    Segovia has several of these so nice Romanesque churches. San Andrés is not even one of the nicest. If l come back to Segovia I'll take enough time to visit the best known ones: San Esteban, San Juan de los Caballeros, San Sebastian, La Trinidad and San Millan.

    San Andr��s
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • breughel's Profile Photo

    REAL SITIO DE LA GRANJA DE SAN ILDEFONSO

    by breughel Updated Feb 7, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    At 12 Km east of Segovia the Palace and the Gardens of LA GRANJA DE SAN ILDEFONSO are a Spanish Versailles built in the 18th c. by King Felipe V, a Bourbon Duke of Anjou, grandson of the French King Louis XIV, who married an Italian princess Isabella Farnese.

    In this Palace and the gardens with fountains on the slopes of the Guadarama mountains one find a combination of the French and Italian art and a marvelous collection of Brussels tapestries heritage from Queen Isabelle the Catholic, our Emperor Charles Quint (V) (born in Gent, Belgium) who became the King Carlos I of Spain and his son Philippe II.
    The guidebook of the Palace says: The Tapestry Collection of the Spanish Crown, the richest in the world … owes its exceptional quality and quantity to the dominium of the Spanish Sovereigns of the House of Austria (Hapsburg) over the Low Countries *(presently Belgium).

    I must admit that I discovered the richness of the Tapestries made in Brussels and Flanders mainly by my travels in Spain. A guide in Segovia told us that if put in line these tapestries would cover about 15 Km!

    See my 22 tips under destination La Granja "Real Sitio de La Granja de San Ildefonso"

    La Granja Palace La Granja Fountain
    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Palacio del Conde Alpuente

    by breughel Written Feb 6, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is a mansion from the 15th c. build by Alfonso Cascales a Segovian powerful nobleman. It is now called Palacio del Conde Alpuente or Casa de Aspiroz. The flamboyant Gothic windows are very nice and the brick decor of the façade is worthwhile a short stop when walking on the Calle de Juan Bravo

    Casa Conde Alpuente
    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • breughel's Profile Photo

    The beautiful Romanesque St. Martin church.

    by breughel Written Feb 5, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ten years ago we were awed by this Romanesque church located halfway between the Aqueduct and the Cathedral. Originally it is a Mozarabic church of the twelfth century surrounded on three sides by one of the finest Romanesque portico-atriums I have seen in Spain.
    The bell tower in the center of the nave has three stores and is also remarkable although somewhat hidden from the street by the beautifully decorated columns of the portico that surrounds the church.
    The only deception we felt on this new visit was that we could not visit the inside of the church because an office was going on.

    St. Martin
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Roman Aqueduct.

    by breughel Written Feb 3, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You can not miss the aqueduct of Segovia, a masterpiece of Roman engineering from the second half of the 1st Century AD; it is the final stretch, bridging a deep depression at the Plaza del Azoguejo just below the old part of town, of an aqueduct system 15 Km long with a slope of 1°.

    Indeed you can not miss the 118 pillars supporting a two-story arcade at about 30 m height and extending over 728 m. This at the entry of Segovia where many of the main roads meet (and where, if you came by car, you better enter the underground parking to get rid of your car).
    You will be even more admiring seeing that the aqueduct is built of unmortared, brick-like granite blocks.

    The aqueduct provided potable water originating from the Rio Frio and traversed the landscape through a series of ducts and underground channels well into the twentieth century.

    Aqueduct. Aqueduct at entrance of Segovia.
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Plaza Mayor.

    by breughel Written Feb 3, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is a nice Plaza Mayor to sit down at one of the terraces and to admire the apse and towers of the cathedral. You can have tapas, raciones and wine at one of the restaurants-bars around the plaza and look at the Segovian families walking under the trees. Now that was ten years ago before the great tourist invasion!
    On our recent visit we had chosen the wrong day, I mean Thursday because this is market day and the terraces of the bars and restaurants are closed to leave space for the market stalls.
    Eating or drinking inside had not the charm of sitting on the Plaza at the tables under the parasols.

    Plaza on market day.
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • DSwede's Profile Photo

    Painted Stained Glass

    by DSwede Written May 10, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    My mother has done lots of work with stained glass over the years. So with that, I may have a particular appreciation for its artistry, delicate nature and skill required to make it.

    Inside the Alcazar, there are some very nice windows with painted stained glass. Some styles have the colored mosaic completely comprised with different color glass panels. This can be difficult, particularly as the overall panels become larger and the individual pieces become smaller. Complexities with the weight of the solder, cutting of the glass, flexibility of the panels, etc. sometimes make it impractical. The panels in Alcazar have colored panels, but added paint layers for finer details. It still gives a fine silhouette with the light behind.

    Without trying to sound too repetitious of the other entries on the Alcazar, here's a brief history.
    It may be interesting to note the that Alcazar (dating back to the 12th century) was for a long time a Royal residence during the Middle Ages, popular with royalty of all of Europe. However when the Court migrated south to Madrid, its walls became cells to prisoners for more than two hundred years before transforming into a military (artillery) school and archives.

    Painted Stained Glass
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • SirRichard's Profile Photo

    The Royal Palace (La Granja)

    by SirRichard Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is obviously one of the main attractions in La Granja. The spanish ruler Felipe V retired here in 1724. He wanted to create here a residence like the one in Versailles. So he planned and extended the gardens and the palace to their nowadays appearance. The Palace was used as a summer residence by many spanish kings until Alfonso XIII.

    The palace
    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    Market at av. de Fernandez Ladreda

    by mindcrime Updated May 14, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The weekend I visited Segovia the pedestrian street of avenida de Fernandez Ladreda was full of people for two reasons.
    First of all there was a big market there with many kiosks selling products from different provinces of Spain (cheese, jamon, souvenirs etc). I bought frying pan with a clock to put on my kitchen’s wall! (pic n.2). There were also some soaps with flavors like chocolate!!

    Anyway, it was funny for a while to see at the end of the street next to the aqueduct, all the strange celebration about May 2, 1808 with all these men and women dressed in that era costumes but the most important part was the boiled pulpo(octopus) served in one of the kiosks. Spicy enough I washed it down with several beers after! :) The women behind the kiosks (pic 5) were cutting the octopus in small pieces with scissors! video

    the market at av. Fernandez Ladreda the frying pan clock! from the market of av.Fernandez Ladreda strange chocolate soaps! pulpo senor!
    Related to:
    • Festivals

    Was this review helpful?

  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    plaza del Azoguejo

    by mindcrime Updated May 14, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Plaza del Azoguejo is the square in front of the Aqueduct. The cars used to pass from there several years before but hopefully they noticed that this caused trouble to the acueduct so the area in front of it converted into a pedestrian zone. There you will also find the Tourist Info and some nice restaurants.
    What’s more I planned my several walking tours in the city from here such as:
    1.You can walk up Calle de Cervantes. This is the typical walk to the main square and then to the Alcazar.
    2.You can walk on Avenida de Fernandez Ladreda. This is the pedestrian street you will walk anyway on your way down from the bus station. You will see the Cathedral on your left but don’t left yet, continue straight until you reach the Aqueduct so to go first to the INFO office.
    3.You can take one of the local buses at the other side of the Aqueduct
    4.You can walk in one of the small streets and get lost for a while in this small beautiful town. At calle de Gobernador Fernandez Gimenez you can find a DIA market for supplies
    5.Just climb up the stairs next to the Aqueduct and enjoy the view

    What’s more at plaza del Azoguejo there was a weekend festival called “Recreacion Historica por las called de Segovia” dedicated to the celebration of May 2 1808 revolution with several acts, dances etc (pics 1-2 and video) The festival takes place not only at this square but at Plaza Mayor also. On May 2, 1808, the people of Madrid rebelled against the occupation of the city by French troops, provoking a brutal repression by the French Imperial forces and triggering the Peninsular War.

    19th century dance in front of the aqueduct! songs from 19th century! the plaza del Azoguejo by night the stairs next to the aqueduct
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Festivals

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    The Tower of Juan II

    by Jefie Updated Aug 28, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When you go for a visit of the Alcazar, you are offered the option of paying an extra 2 Euros to go up the Tower of Juan II, which was built during the 15th century. If you are slightly out of shape, then perhaps you might want to pass on climbing the narrow, uneven steps; otherwise, I'd say go for it! The view from the top of the tower is simply incredible and when you compare the admission price with what you have to pay to climb up other well-known European monuments (say, 8 Euros for the Arc du Triomphe in Paris), you're actually getting a pretty good deal!

    Just like the Alcazar, the Tower of Juan II is open daily from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm. It is also possible to go up the tower without visiting the alcazar, but who would want to do that?!

    View of the city from the Tower of Juan II At the Alcazar with Cecile La Torre de Juan II Not exactly the most easiest steps to climb! Cecile and I, on top of the Tower of Juan II
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    The Alcazar of Segovia

    by Jefie Updated Aug 28, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Alcazar of Segovia dates back to the beginning of the 12th century, although there is no way of knowing for sure when it was built - the presence of the aqueduct nearby has led many historians to believe it might have been the site of a 1st century Roman fortress. Even if it was first built as a fortress, throughout the years the Alcazar has also served as a state prison, a military academy, and a royal palace. It has now been restored to look the way it did when the King and Queen of Spain lived in Segovia.

    Before I went to Segovia, some people told me that the Alcazar was similar to Cinderella's Castle at Walt Disney World - I can't say that I saw much resemblance, but I was still very impressed with my visit, especially as it was my first time walking around a real Medieval castle, complete with a drawbridge built to get across the surrounding ditch. You can pick up a leaflet as you go in, and this will provide you with all the information you need to go on a self-guided tour. Oh, and pictures are actually allowed inside the Alcalzar, a rare feat in Spain!

    The Alcazar is open daily, from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm. Admission costs 4 Euros.

    The Alcazar of Segovia Inside the royal appartments The ceiling of More incredible art on the ceiling The Throne Room
    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Walking through the streets of Segovia

    by Jefie Written Aug 27, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A bit like Toledo, Segovia is a city in which you're just dying to get lost. The main difference with Toledo, however, is that you don't have that claustrophobic feeling when you walk through the streets of Segovia, nor do you risk getting run over by a tour bus! Somehow the sun manages to reach the narrow streets of the old city and with so much amazing architecture and a gorgeous natural setting, beautiful sites are waiting to be discovered around every corner. So go on, lose yourself for a while, and I dare you not to fall in love with Segovia!!

    Somewhere in the old city Walking down Calle de Cervantes Two nice buildings in the shawdow of the aqueduct
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Avenida de Fernandez Ladreda

    by Jefie Written Aug 27, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you're looking for a good place to end your day in Segovia, you might want to experience the atmosphere of Avenida de Fernandez Ladreda in the evening. As the main street leading to the aqueduct, the Avenida is full of restaurants, bars and cafes, and it becomes very lively in the evening as daytrippers and locals, families and students all grab a table at one of the many sidewalk patios, or simply sit down on a bench and chat for a while. A really good spot if you feel like having one last drink and order a few tapas before heading back to the bus station which is located just down the street.

    Avenida de Fernandez Ladreda, in Segovia

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    The churches of Segovia

    by Jefie Written Aug 27, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are many beautiful churches in Segovia, both inside and outside the fortifications, with many dating as far back as the beginning of the 12th century. The most interesting ones are the Iglesia de San Esteban, the Iglesia de San Millan, the Iglesia de Santo Justo and the Capilla de la Vera Cruz, which was built by the Knights Templar and now belongs to the Knights of Malta (various legends surround this chapel owing to the secret ceremonies that were allegedly held within its walls). If you have enough time, it's well worth visiting them, although most are only open to the public for a few hours every day (usually from about 10:30 am to 1:30 pm, and then from 4:30 pm to 7:00 pm).

    San Millan, one of Segovia's oldest churches
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Segovia

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

45 travelers online now

Comments

Segovia Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Segovia things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Segovia sightseeing.

View all Segovia hotels