Las Ramblas, Barcelona

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  • Las Ramblas, Barcelona
    Las Ramblas, Barcelona
    by Danalia
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    by Dizzyhead
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    La Rambla
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  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    so many living statues

    by mindcrime Written Mar 28, 2009

    5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    living statues at Las Ramblas
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    Ok, you already know that this huge pedestrian street is the most famous in Barcelona. Las Ramblas is a river of people goes up and down day and night, it’s always packed with tourists and no matter why you will pass from here many times. Take care of your wallet (many pickpockets around) and if you can avoid eating at the tourists tapa bars here (the prices are for tourists too) you will enjoy some nice living statues (pic 1&2) (more than anywhere else in the world) and other street artists.

    If the living statues aint enough for you try the Wax Museum (Museu de Cera) also (pic 3) at Passatge de la Banca at the foot of the Ramblas. It is housed on a building from 19th century and has about 300 wax figures. It is open daily 10.00-19.30 (weekends 11.00-20.30) with a short break during noon. The entrance fee is 10euro but if you seen Madame Tussauds you better skip this one unless you are desperate to see Wagner, Dali, Hitler and Don Quixote (among many other famous figures) at the same building :)

    The Museum of Erotica at (Ramblas 96) is like the ones in cities like Paris and Amsterdam with many sculptures, paintings and artifacts from all over the world (the ones from Africa seemed interesting). It is open daily 10.00-00.00 (October to may 11.00-21.00) and the entrance fee is 7 euros.

    Although the day after was dedicated to Gaudi’s building I decided to check one of his building at a small street, 1’ walk from Las Ramblas at Nou de la Rambla 3-5. Palau Guell is a neogothic mansion that was build in 1889 and it was the first work of Gaudi in the center when Guell decided to put his money at an unkown architect. Gaudi designed also the furniture and other objects. The chimneys(pic 4) with the obelisk shape are nice and free to see if you don’t want to pay for go inside although there was no entrance fee during my visit because of restoration (Tuesday to Saturday 10.00-14.30). The façade is full of straight lines, a surprise for me because it seems he started to “play” with curves later at other buildings.

    As you go up Las Ramblas you can turn right into Placa Real (pic 5) a nice square that was build in 1850 (there used to be a monastery at the same place before) and although always busy it is nicely decorated with palms trees and some street lamps designed by Guadi. Some tapa bars that has normal prices (I was expecting much more)

    Near metro station Licau you can see the Opera of Barcelona and further up near Placa Catalunya the Royal Academy Of Science and Arts that is a theatre.

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  • spanishguy's Profile Photo

    Cosmopolitan atmosphere-Ambiente cosmopolita

    by spanishguy Updated Jul 13, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Las Ramblas
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    La Rambla is a popular iconic and busy street in central Barcelona connecting Catalonia square (Plaça de Catalunya) and the Columbus monument. It's full of street theatre, cafés and market stalls as well as various performances and street vendors. "Las Ramblas" are divided into different sections, as Rambla de Canaletes, Rambla dels Estudis (study), Rambla dels Caputxins, Rambla de Santa Mònica and Rambla de les Flors (flowers). There are several interesting buildings here, as the ones I show you in my pictures. One of the funniest is the Bruno Quadros House or the Umbrellas' house, because his owner became very rich selling this article and some umbrellas decorate the façade. This building also has a Chinese dragon in the corner. The Main Theater (Teatro Principal) was the oldest in town, coming from the 16th Century. It's not a theatre any more but it still overlooking La Rambla with a collection of busts depicting actors of long gone eras.

    La Rambla es un icono popular del centro de Barcelona, conectando la Plaza de Cataluña con el Monumento a Colón. Está llena de teatro callejero, cafés y mercadillos, asñi como varios espectáculos y vendedores callejeros. "Las Ramblas" están divididas en diferentes secciones, como la Rambla de Canalete, la Rambla de los Estudios, la Rambla de los Capuchinos, la Rambla de Santa Mónica y la Rambla de las Flores. Hay algunos edificios interesantes aquí, como los que muestro en las fotos. Uno de los más divertidos es la Casa Bruno Quadros, o de los Paraguas, porque su dueño se hizo rico vendiendo este accesorio y algunos paraguas decoran la fachada. El Teatro Principal era el más antiguo de la ciudad, viniendo del siglo XVI. Ya no es un teatro pero continua mirando a La Rambla con una colección de bustos representanto actores de hace tiempo.

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  • clairegeordio's Profile Photo

    A Walk Down Las Ramblas

    by clairegeordio Written Jun 13, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Las Ramblas

    The Ramblas is Spain’s most famous street, a boulevard lined with trees, which is almost 2km long and is dotted with hotels, cafes, restaurants, news stands. It stretches from the harbour, down to Plaça Catalunya. The word Rambla, derived from the Arabic word ‘ramla’, serves as a reminder that in earlier times, the street was a gully that ran parallel to the medieval wall, and carried rainwater down to the sea. The Ramblas is split into sections as you walk down it, one section where you find street artists doing drawings and caricatures, known as the Rambla de Santa Monica, Rambla del Centre comes next, followed by Rambla de les Flors, where there are many colourful flower seller stands, next is La Rambla dels Ocells, where you can find sellers of birds and baby animals in cages and lastly La Rambla de Canaletes. All along you can find street performers and living statues. This street never has a dull moment and is crowded at all times of the day, but you can’t visit Barcelona without experiencing it.

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  • Jetgirly's Profile Photo

    Crazy Shopping and Siteseeing Street!

    by Jetgirly Written Dec 27, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A Street Performer on Las Ramblas

    There is nothing else like The Ramblas! This stretch of road runs 1.4 kilometers, from the heart of Barcelona (Plaza Catalunya) right down to the ocean. Along the way you will see street performers, stalls selling birds, florists and all sorts of other crazy stuff. There is a wide pedestrian walkway that is always packed, and narrow single lanes of traffic on either side. There are TONS of restaurants along the Ramblas, as well as some cute shops and many hotels. There is no way you can avoid this street on your trip, so embrace all the hustle and bustle and go with the flow!

    At the bottom of the Ramblas, there is a giant monument to Columbus. You can ride the elevator right to the top for 360 degree views of the port and Ramblas!

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  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    La Rambla-A Parade of People

    by VeronicaG Updated Oct 30, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Las Ramblas

    We sauntered up this pedestrian boulevard one pretty Fall afternoon on our way to view the port. If you have time, try to visit this area.

    La Rambla makes it an easy walk to the waterfront, where you'll pass sidewalk cafes, flower stands, newstands, kiosks and statue men. It's an ideal spot for people-watching and a very busy place!

    Named originally for a 'seasonal stream' which flowed into the city, this once pungent part of the city began attracting the affluent in the 16th century. Impressive mansions were constructed along its streets, with the Gran Teatre de Liceu sitting on its western side.

    There are five different sections making up Las Ramblas: La Rambla de Canaletes, La Rambla dels Estudis,La Rambla de Sant Josep, LaRambla dels Caputxins and La Rambla de Santa a Colom.

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  • magictravelers's Profile Photo

    Enchanting Walk thru Las Ramblas

    by magictravelers Updated Feb 7, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    My nieces adriana and Paoulete loved the statues

    Las Ramblas is probably the most visited place in Barcelona, by tourists and locals as well. It is a long walkway towards the sea, where you will see living statues, musicians, juggles, you can buy flowers, pets, or have your portrait done by an upcoming artist.
    It is free, but you may end up spending a lot more money than in a museum. All living statues require a coin to move and there are dozens of souvenirs shops (don´t pay what they ask you, offer less).
    WARNING:
    There is so many people here every day, you may get pick pocketed easily. Be aware, don´t bring purses or keep them in your hands and watch out for your camera and video equipment.
    WARNING 2! There is a "gang" that will do what they call "tricks" where you will have to guess where the ball ends up underneath some cups, find the card, and such games. You will see that a woman or a couple will always guess correctly; well, this is a group of people "working" together to take your money. When my family came over for our wedding, we sat behind and watched for about half and hour and saw it all. After that, the government has put up signs that say: IT IS NOT A GAME IT IS A TRICK. That is what they refer to, if you did not know.

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  • spgood301's Profile Photo

    Las Ramblas

    by spgood301 Updated Sep 16, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You've heard all about Las Ramblas-I doubt I can add anything new. It's a place to be while in Barcelona, day or night. The street performers, the merchants selling birds, all of the restaurants. I was surprised how short Las Ramblas is-I was expecting to walk much longer to get to the bottom.

    It's the best place to buy your kitschy (sic) Barcelona souvenirs. I bought a Barcelona t-shirt with Homer Simpson's picture. It's one of my prize possesions (boy, am I sad!)

    One word of warning: I didn't check the menu before ordering a meal, and paid around 9 euros for a glass (albeit very large) of orange juice. I was hoping it was some sort of magic orange juice, but I don't think it was.

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  • Maria_75's Profile Photo

    LAS RAMBLAS - the history

    by Maria_75 Updated Oct 1, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This name comes from the Arabic word for riverbed. It was originally just a path beside a stream that was running through the centre of the old city.

    Today it is a famous avenue that is the bustling centre of all kinds of activities. You can find almost anything here. Las Ramblas runs from Placa de Catalunya, a main square full of shops, restaurants, and banks, located at the centre of the city, down to the monument of Columbus on the waterfront.

    The avenue is broken up into five sections, each with its own name and characteristics. The first one is La Rambla de Canaletes, which was named after the fountain Font de les Canaletes. Legends says that whoever drinks from this fountain will forever keep returning to Barcelona.

    The next area is named after the Estudi General (university) and is called La Rambla dels Estudis. But some also call it La Rambla dels Ocells (avenue of the birds), because of its many places selling birds and small animals.

    Next is La Rambla de les Flors, where you can buy all kinds of flowers. This is also where you find the century-old Boqueria Market. Inside this market you can find the freshest produce, meat, fish, and dried fruits.

    Then there is the La Rambla del centre and La Rambla de Santa Monica that brings you to Barcelona’s harbour. At the seafront is La Rambla de Mar where you can find the beach, an aquarium, restaurants, movie theatres and popular nightclubs.

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  • seamandrew's Profile Photo

    La Rambla, the busiest Avenue in Barcelona

    by seamandrew Updated Aug 2, 2005

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    People pass one of many flower shops on La Rambla

    I recommend that any trip to walk down La Rambla begin up at the northern end by the Plaça de Catalunya. From there you can embark on that flow of humanity down to the sea (no joke, it's crowded!). The best advice is to plunge in, go with the flow and enjoy the constant weird and wonderful activities taking place around you. Let yourself be carried past lottery ticket booths, shoe shiners, cheap pensions, human statues (performers), and people of all types. Let your senses be assailed by the squawking of caged birds, the perfumed air of the flower stalls, the chatter of the gossips and the shrieks of the fruit markets.

    There are a number of things to see both on La Rambla and off. So if you're really looking to get to know it, expect to spend some time there. La Rambla is broken down to the Rambla de Catalunya, Rambla de Canaletes (which by the way gets it's name from the Font de Canaletes), Rambla dels Estudis, Rambla de Sant Josep, Rambla dels Caputxins, Rambla de Santa Mònica., down to the Monument a Colom and the waterfront.

    Oh and please, please be aware of pickpockets. With such large groups of people, they inevitably prey on such a bountiful crowd. As should be a norm anywhere you go, being aware and strapping cameras and bags tightly to your body is usually enough to deter thieves.

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  • seamandrew's Profile Photo

    Font de Canaletes, can the legend be true?

    by seamandrew Updated Aug 2, 2005

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    Font de Canaletes

    The Font de Canaletes is one of the 'symbols' of Barcelona. There's not much to say other than there is a small brass plaque at the foot of this 19th-century cast-iron fountain that confirms the legend that all those who drink its waters will be enamoured with Barcelona and always return. I don't know if the legend is true, but at the time of this post, I already went back for a second trip. Must be true I guess!

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  • travelgourmet's Profile Photo

    LA RAMBLAS...A TOURIST MUST SEE

    by travelgourmet Updated Feb 15, 2011

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    TOURIST DELITE

    A street of dreams, a street of action, a street of reputation. All of these descriptions fit La Ramblas, Les Ramblas, or Las Ramblas, all three names apply to the area that runs from the Christopher Columbus monument, near the sea, north to Playca Catalunya.

    Restaurants that are ready for the tourists with food and prices to match, the grand market, closeness to the sea, the many shops that draw the tourist inside, and the mime artists, bird sellers and flower stalls that line the sidewalks make for a vibrant center of the city.

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  • scottishvisitor's Profile Photo

    Watch the Human Statues come to life

    by scottishvisitor Updated Sep 11, 2006

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    Flower Power

    La Rambla is a pedestrian street full of colour and fun. There are many restaurants, shops, market stalls selling almost anything imaginable. The local art work is featured here. There are human statues positioned in popular places where tourists like to stop, always ready to surprise you by instantly coming to life - you will see a lot of startled tourists here! If you take a picture be sure to leave some change, these Statues don't like to get ignored!

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  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    Street Artists on Las Ramblas

    by easyoar Written Nov 28, 2004

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    Street Artist on Las Ramblas - now where's my head

    As you stroll down the Las Ramblas avenue, you will see many different types of Street Artist. Some stand very still and wait for someone in the crowd to move them into a silly position which they then hold. Others dance or do incredible skills with a football.

    If you are really brave however you will cut your head off and play a musical instrument...

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    La Rambla

    by MM212 Updated Aug 8, 2012

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    London Plane Trees in la Rambla
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    Barcelona's most famous avenue, la Rambla, is also its liveliest. The centre part of this tree-lined avenue is pedestrianised, allowing for cafés, kiosks, mimes, florists, tourists and pickpockets alike to take advantage and to keep this circus-like thoroughfare busy around the clock. The avenue officially runs from the Mediterranean shore all the way up through Eixample to Avinguda Diagonal. However, the most celebrated section of la Rambla is the lower part, starting from Plaça de Catalunya to the port. Numerous historic buildings line la Rambla, which traces the shape of an old filled river bed. In fact, the avenue's name is derived from the Arabic world ramla which refers to the sand in a dry seasonal river bed. Over time, the river bed was filled to become what we see today. Along this part of la Rambla is also some creative architecture as well as a few famous old-world shops with Art Nouveau details (see photos).

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  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    The Umbrella Shop Dragon

    by easyoar Written Nov 28, 2004

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    The Umbrella Shop Dragon

    When you've walked halfway along the Ramblas, you will come to the Placa de la Boqueria where there is the Miro mosaic in the pavement. At this point, look at the buildings on the side of the road.

    One of these buildings used to be an umbrella shop, and the owner of the time had some very ornate decoration put up on the outside of the building in an art deco style. The most impressive part is the dragon with a fan, dangling an umbrella. It's difficult to explain, but the picture should be able to do this!

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