Sagrada Familia, Barcelona

4.5 out of 5 stars 441 Reviews

Carrer de Mallorca 401 93 207 30 31

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    La sagrada familia, Barcelona
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  • Robmj's Profile Photo

    La Sagrada Familia

    by Robmj Updated May 5, 2012

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    La Sagrada Familia
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    This is possibly Barcelona's most famous and probably most controversial building.

    Gaudí's original design calls for a total of eighteen spires, representing in ascending order of height the Twelve Apostles, the four Evangelists, the Virgin Mary and, tallest of all, Jesus Christ. Eight spires have been built as of 2010, corresponding to four apostles at the Nativity façade and four apostles at the Passion façade.

    Though construction of Sagrada Família had commenced in 1882!!!!, Gaudí became involved in 1883, taking over the project and transforming it with his architectural and engineering style—combining Gothic and curvilinear Art Nouveau forms. One projection anticipates construction completion around 2026, the centennial of Gaudí's death—while the project's information leaflet estimates a completion date in 2028.

    The main nave was covered and an organ installed in mid-2010, allowing the still unfinished building to be used for religious services. The church was consecrated by Pope Benedict XVI on 7 November 2010 which was just after we visited on the 11 October 2010.

    For me, the building is a construction site and disappointing. While there are many architectural marvels and a grand design, the surrounding cranes really detract the image. Oh well, I guess I'll just have to visit again after 2026!.

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  • yvgr's Profile Photo

    Overpriced tickets...

    by yvgr Written Apr 5, 2012

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    Inside Sagrada familia
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    I went to look at the construction work of this place and found it overpriced. They also charged an extra for using the elevator up into the towers. For those not interested in architecture this will be a bit disappointing since it was nothing to see except the workers when I went inside Nov. 2009. Maybe work ha proceeded since then...

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  • Benson35's Profile Photo

    Sagrada Familia

    by Benson35 Updated Feb 3, 2012

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    The construction of this astounding church started in 1882 and is not expected to be finished for another 30 years (approx. 2042). It was hoped that the church would be completed by 2026, which would mark the 100th anniversary of Gaudi's death. This is not to be.

    You can see from my photographs above, different parts of the church are certainly more weathered than others, hence, these are the oldest parts. I find it amazing that the building of this church has carried on for so many years. You can see the different materials used and I find it even more amazing that it's going to take three more decades to complete!!!

    There is an entrance fee to go inside the church. The fee goes towards money for further construction. The entrance fee includes a visit to the museum under the church where you can see the history of the construction of La Sagrada Familia and examples of how the church should look when completed.

    Entrance fees:
    Approx. 12 euros (there are discounts for consessions & under 10s are free of charge)
    3 euros to get in the lift to the spires.
    A guided tour is offered for 15 euros

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  • aussirose's Profile Photo

    Sagrada Familia - Gaudi architecture at its best

    by aussirose Written Jan 21, 2012

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    Sagrada Familia - Gaudi architecture at its best
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    The Sangra Familia is Gaudi's most famous building. Everywhere you look in Barcelona's skyline it is the most prominent building.

    The Sangra Familia is still under construction today.

    You pass it on the blue tourist bus route and it's best to sit up the top deck for photo opportunities.

    I much preferred Gaudi's other buildings to this one but there's no doubt that the Sangra Familia is an amazing work of art and not hidious as Picasso and Orwell suggested.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Sagrada Familia, design elements

    by Martin_S. Updated Dec 22, 2011

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    Sagrada Familia, design elements, Barcelona, Spain
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    One of the most attractive design elements that I saw on the interior was this spiral staircase, it just seemed to flow upwards, defying the effect of gravity.
    The second photo shows a design element that did not seem to "fit", have not idea what it might represent (or not).
    The third photo seems to be, or at least looks like, the Zodiac sign of Leo, but with wings...
    The fourth and fifth photos show Gaudi in full flower with these ostentatious "blooms" on the roof.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Sagrada Familia, windows II

    by Martin_S. Updated Dec 22, 2011

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    Sagrada Familia, windows, Barcelona, Spain
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    One of the first things that I look at when I enter a structure is the windows, or more properly you might say the light that is entering and how it interacts with the interior. In most religious structures you have the addition of stained glass, an element which can seriously add or detract from the beauty. Many stained glass windows seem to create darkness, but here in Sagrada Familia they admit light while "staining" it in multi colors that enhance the interior.

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    Sagrada Familia, windows I

    by Martin_S. Updated Dec 21, 2011

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    Sagrada Familia, windows, Barcelona, Spain
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    Looking at the stained glass windows in Sagrada Familia, you are sometimes almost fooled into thinking you are in a "regular" church. That is until you notice the design of the window frames, the way some of the glass subjects are almost abstract in structure and the surroundings bring you back to where you truly are.
    A point that is made when you learn of the windows is that they are composed of differing darknesses of glass, the object of which is to allow light in at varying degrees of intensity. It seems that Gaudi wanted to admit more light, not less. Some glass elements are combined with sunlights to admit and gather sunlight and utilize it as the lighting element as opposed to artifical light.
    The structure is still under construction and nothing seems to make that more obvious than the scaffolding outside, but inside you have two things that remind you also. The first and most obvious are the sounds of construction, you may hear a saw or a grinder working away at the structure. But you also have an entire side wall of "stained glass windows" with NO STAINED GLASS", nope, no stained glass, at the moment they are just plain clear glass, waiting for the moment when they will be changed.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Sagrada Familia, the columns

    by Martin_S. Updated Dec 21, 2011

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    Sagrada Familia, columns, Barcelona, Spain
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    These huge columns support that arching roof WAY over your head. The Audio Guide gives you a number, saying it is so and so HIGH...but the numbers do not translate into what your eyes see, this ceiling is REALLY HIGH. The simple colums with few or no decorations on the lower sections seem to slim to support such a ceiling. Some branch out at about 3/4 of the way up, they look like a tree with the lower branches missing. Some of the columns support walkways or balconies, but others reach all the way up to the ceiling that seems such a vast distance. This may be a function of the amount of light, Sagrada Familia is designed to let in light. Many older structures look gloomy, Sagrada Familia does not, even with its huge size, maybe "welcoming" would be the word I'm looking for.

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    Sagrada Familia, Ceilings, a view from below

    by Martin_S. Updated Dec 21, 2011

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    Sagrada Familia, ceiling, Barcelona, Spain
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    No problem with claustrophobia here in Sagrada Familia, the ceilings are so high that if you don't actually look up you may not notice them. But Gaudi took care of that also, the columns are built in such a way that they seem to naturally draw your glance upwards...and I guess in a church that is the point, "look to heaven". The diversity of the different design elements he used around the ceilings is beautiful if somewhat simpler than what we had seen in many Gaudi designs. Many looked like flowers with the center being a skylight, letting in sunlight so that the flower could glow. Again, the columns themselves were on the simple side, almost no protrusions or decorations, just simple columns with a single "bulge" somewhere near the top where the column would split and arch over and on that bulge are varying decorations.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Sagrada Familia, a view from...

    by Martin_S. Updated Dec 21, 2011

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    Sagrada Familia, tower views, Barcelona, Spain
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    Admit it, the first thing that comes to your mind when you visit a religious structure is, NOT, going up in the tower for a look around, or at least it was not my first thought. But here in the Sagrada Familia of Gaudi, I would tell anyone, it is a slightly restricted view because of the way the openings in the tower are built, narrow like the arrow slits on castle walls is what they reminded me of. But it IS THE BEST VIEW IN TOWN (with possibly one exception, the Torre de Collserola tower and Tibidabo, up on the highest hill surrounding Barcelona)
    So take a look at the first photo which shows the view straight down inside the tower. If you have no problem with heights, then take this short trip up. You can get an elevator, costs about 2.50 Euro and they give you a specific time that you have the elevator, so don't miss it.
    As you can see in the photos the continous building is putting up scaffolding, making some of the views very "junky" (even the top of the tower had been covered in some sort of netting to protect it from damage or falling pieces), but the clear views are spectacular to say the least.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Sagrada Familia, the museum underground

    by Martin_S. Written Dec 20, 2011

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    Sagrada Familia museum, Barcelona, Spain
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    From the ticket booths, to reach the museum, you need to enter the Passion entrance, cross the entire width of the basicilla, exit by way of the Nativity entrance and then go down a ramp on the right side to enter the underground museum.
    The museum has on display facade designs, concept drawings & sketches, carvings and flooring plans. There is even an observation room where you can observe workers preparing things for the building.

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    Sagrada Familia, outside views

    by Martin_S. Updated Dec 20, 2011

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    Sagrada Familia, outside view, Barcelona, Spain
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    The third main entrance that leads into the temple is apparently the simple brother to the Passion and Nativity side entrances. As you can see in the first photo, very little decoration, but if you look closely you will see three orange spots up high. No those are not stained glass windows, those are three workmen on ropes that you can see better in the second photo.
    The third photo shows again the Passion entrance, but as seen from the side. This is just to compare it with the fourth photo that shows the undecorated entrance. The fifth and last photo here shows some of the typical Gaudi type decorations on the roof, similiar to Bathlo and Palau Guell.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Sagrada Familia, Nativity facade

    by Martin_S. Updated Dec 20, 2011
    Sagrada Familia, Nativity side, Barcelona, Spain
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    The Nativity facade or entrance on the opposite side from the Passion entrance, needs a long view to see it in its entirety, but also a close up view to see the tiny intricate details. Unlike the Passion facade which has almost monumental sized statuary with angular and pure lines, the Nativity facade has gone in the opposite direction with such a gluttony of detail that you need to sit down and try to wrap your imagination around all you can see. I have added only a few of the dozens of photos I took, most with a telephoto lens so I could later see in more detail what was too far away to see. This entrance towers above you and the small details continue all the way up.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Sagrada Familia, Passion facade, part I

    by Martin_S. Updated Dec 20, 2011
    Sagrada Familia, Passion facade, Barcelona, Spain
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    When you get your ticket and enter by way of the Passion gate, if you do not look UP, you might imagine that you are entering any public building, the double entrance doors are, when compared with the rest of the structure, rather simple. I would suggest that you AVOID looking up until you pay for your ticket and reach the entrance...at that point, STOP, then look up. A very impressive display, both in size and design. The many statues surrounding the HUGE arches at this point is one of the most outstanding features of a place that has lots and lots of outstanding features.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Sagrada Familia, Passion facade, part II

    by Martin_S. Updated Dec 19, 2011
    Sagrada Familia, Passion facade, Barcelona, Spain
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    The Passion facade of the Sagrada Familia is just too vast to get into a photo, or even a few photos, you would have to leave the basicilica, cross the street and enter the park to be able to get it all into a single photo. All devoted to the death and ressurection of Jesus (sorry, that is what I got from the audioguide, I admit that I am not well versed in religion of any sort).

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