Sagrada Familia, Barcelona

4.5 out of 5 stars 441 Reviews

Carrer de Mallorca 401 93 207 30 31

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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    La Sagrada Familia

    by sue_stone Updated Feb 27, 2007

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    Sagrada Familia - Passion Facade
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    My favourite building in Barcelona would have to be the Sagrada Familia, and it isn't even finished yet! The Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Familia is Gaudi's unfinished masterpiece - a massive church that he was working on when he died (in 1926) and which is still under construction today.

    Currently only two of the three planned facades have been built - the Nativity Façade and the Passion Façade, with work now commencing on the Glory Façade. Each façade has 4 tall towers, and there will be an additional 6 towers built, giving the church 18 towers in total - the tallest of which could be up to 170 metres high. When the church is finished it will hold up to 13,000 people. It is hoped that it will be completed in time for the 100 year anniversary of Gaudi's death in 2026.

    Although under construction, you can go inside the church and explore this amazing work in progress. Make sure you have a look at some of the beautiful stained glass windows that have recently been completed - the light reflects the colours of the windows onto the tall pillars inside the church.

    You can also visit some of the towers, towards the top of the church. First you will have to catch the lift, and then walk up stairs to reach the outside of the towers. It is an amazing experience to get an up-close look at the majesty of Gaudi's work.

    Opening Hours: Daily from 9am-8pm

    Admission cost: 8 euro, or combined with Casa Museu Gaudi (in Park Guell), 9 euro

    There are additional charges for: lift to the top of the building (2 euro); audio tour or guided tour (3.50 euro) (All prices correct as at Feb 2007)

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  • atufft's Profile Photo

    Part I: Old and New Spires of Gaudi

    by atufft Updated May 23, 2007

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    Entrance Post Showing 1883 Commencement Date
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    Antonio Gaudi is without doubt the world's greatest surreal architect. Before he began construction on the Sagrada Familia in 1882, Gaudi had already completed many other works, but it's also true that he spend some 40 years constructing this cathedral, and the last 15 years were devotedly solely to it. Yet, Sagrada Familia, formally known as Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Família, was always his passion and the birth of surrealism in architectural form. He modified his designs many times, but most of them are available for visitors in the museum below the Passion side of the structure. To visualize structural symmetry as well as integrity, Gaudi hung fabric with weights in ways that resembled the spires upside down. Thus, he was able to find both beauty and strength of construction that would last a very long time. In these images, note the slender height of the towers, which deceive the eye by appearing very airy and without the massiveness so often found Gothic style churches of the time. In this respect, the newer towers built after his untimely death try to replicate this with a honeycomb look. Gaudi's early style appears to me a blend of Gothic and Modern, particularly in the Apse, the first section constructed. Born in that that architectural epoch, as seen in the introductory foundation entrance post of 1882, Gaudi later a clearly evolved beyond the static Gothic that had ruled European church building for nearly a thousand years. As Gaudi increasingly wanted delicate spires that appeared not massive and imposing but reaching skyward without the terrestrial bound bound nature of stone built Gothic style. He envisioned towers that reached toward the heavens with liberty, rising toward an unearthly realm. To do this, Gaudi also clearly employed steel and portland cement, a relatively new building innovation at the time. His plans call for a total of 18 spires, one representing each, in ascending order of height, the 12 Apostles, the 4 Evangelists, the Virgin Mary, and highest of all, Jesus Christ.

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  • csordila's Profile Photo

    The world's most special cathedral

    by csordila Updated Feb 14, 2010

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    Cranes & spires
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    The largest, still unfinished work of Gaudi is the Sagrada Familia cathedral, the last great work of Spanish Catholicism. It is not merely a church, but simultaneously ancient monument, symbol and collective creation.
    The idea of building a church came from a rich bookseller whose dream was a huge basilica, where the rich and poor people can pray together.

    To complete it Gaudi estimated at least 200 years, but his grotesque death in a tram accident has not allowed to proceed as planned. When Gaudi was asked about the exceptionally long implementation, he supposedly said only: "My client is not in a hurry".

    Since then, architects and experts argue whether the construction according to the remaining plans may be completed, or just it would be a caricature of the original idea. Therefore, a lot of people have the opinion, the Sagrada should never be finished from symbolic reasons, because it's charms would be best showed by leaving it unfinished.
    (The most hopeless architectural project of the world will be completed for the centenary of Gaudi death in 2026.)

    The intended building is based on sketches of Gaudi since the original plans has been lost during the Civil War. In the end, there should be 12 towers, each of which representing an apostle - at the moment there are only 8. The central dome will eventually have a tall tower with Jesus on it, accompanied by a Virgin Mary tower, and four additional ones for the four still lacking apostles.
    From the 3 main facades 2 have been already completed; the Southern according to the original plans of Gaudi, but the striking Northern facade has no direct influence of Gaudi.

    On the east side you can visit the top of one of the towers. But it is very narrow, and if you have claustrophobia, delete this part from your tour. By the way, the interior of the church is an active place of construction. However, if you want to see, how to built a church, then it is a place for you to experience the dusty air.
    Whatever will be, one thing is sure, - sooner or later the dream of Master Gaudi will be realized.

    Open daily: October to March from 9am–6pm; April to September from 9am–8pm;
    Admission 8 €, Elevator - 2 €
    The entire entrance fees as a donation go to the construction of the church. Recently was announced, a part of the Cathedral will be opened for religious services in 2010.
    Other website: http://www.sagradafamilia.cat/sf-eng/

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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    La Sagrada Família museum

    by mallyak Written Sep 9, 2008

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    Every part of the design of La Sagrada Família is rich with Christian symbolism, as Gaudí intended the church to be the "last great sanctuary of Christendom". Its most striking aspect is its spindle-shaped towers. A total of 18 tall towers are called for, representing in ascending order of height the twelve Apostles, the four Evangelists, the Virgin Mary and, tallest of all, Jesus Christ. (According to the 2005 "Works Report" of the temple's official website, drawings signed by Gaudí found recently in the Municipal Archives indicate that the tower of the Virgin was in fact intended by Gaudí to be shorter than those of the evangelists, and this is the design — which the Works Report states is more compatible with the existing foundations — that will be followed. The same source explains the symbolism in terms of Christ being known through the Evangelists.

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    Sagrada familia

    by mallyak Written Sep 9, 2008

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    La Sagrada Família (Catalan, 'The Holy Family') is a large Roman Catholic basilica under construction in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Its formal title is Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Família. Antoni Gaudí worked on the project for over 40 years, devoting the last 15 years of his life entirely to this endeavor. On the subject of the extremely long construction period, Gaudí is said to have joked, "My client is not in a hurry." After Gaudí's death in 1926, work continued under the direction of Domènech Sugranyes until interrupted by the Spanish Civil War in 1935.

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  • cinthya_in_victoria's Profile Photo

    Sagrada Familia Church

    by cinthya_in_victoria Updated Dec 30, 2008

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    Sagrada Familia, is a massive Roman Catholic church under construction that began in 1882 and continues to this day. You can go inside and the entrance costs 8€ and includes the museum.

    As the construction on Sagrada Familia is not supported by any government or official church sources, money from tickets purchased by tourists is now used to pay for the work, which are expected to be completed around 2026, the 100th anniversary of Gaudi's death.

    Its archetucture is complex and fascinating. It has three facades:
    the Nativity to the East, the Glory to the South (which is not completed yet) and the Passion to the West.

    The Nativity facade was built before work was interrupted in 1935 and bears the most direct Gaudí influence. The Passion facade is especially striking for its spare, gaunt, tormented characters, including emaciated figures of Christ being flogged and on the crucifix. These designs are Josep Maria Subirachs' work.

    This great church will leave you speachless, I guarantee that!!

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  • dont waste your $$$

    by barce09 Written Aug 13, 2009

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    Paid 11 euros to get into the church, very disappointed, the church is a long way from being completed (about 100 years) the inside is about 2% done, don't waste your money the church is amazing from the outside, but you can see that from the street.

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Sagrada Familia

    by BruceDunning Updated Dec 3, 2011

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    View of the Nativity facade
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    The church is to be completed by 2025, and not earlier, but it was consecrated in 2010 by the Pope. The city and State has put in millions; like $18 million for 2009 alone, in addition to private donations, for a total to finish to date of $70 million, and only 50% complete. This is progress in that it was only 25% complete when Gaudi was killed in a vehicle accident in 1926, after working on this form 1883.
    The main theme was to have a central nave, and three main facades; Nativity, Passion and Glory (not yet done). Nativity is the most ornate and detailed, and the Passion has simple lines and somewhat abstract figurines/sculptures imbedded into the concrete works. The roof was to has 18 spires planned by Gaudi, of which eight have been built so far.
    Entry is 12 Euro and it is open 9-6PM Oct-Mar and 9-8PM in summer months. The lines waiting to get in are at least 1-1/12 hours, and personally I would not wait for that memory. It is totally packed outside with people surrounding the city block it encompasses, and walking around with vehicle traffic, people, and shops is for the wary and weary.

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  • Joacim's Profile Photo

    The work of a genious

    by Joacim Updated Nov 15, 2013

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    La Sagrada de familia
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    It is a fantastic building, on the outside. There you can feel the power of Gaudi. The details of the fascade, the overall architectural brilliance, it is stunning. I don't know if I can say that I think it is beautiful, but stunning, brilliant, genious and fascinating, yes!

    Last time I was inside, 2009, I was a bit disappointed. I was hoping for a cathedral kind a feeling but got a building site feeling instead. Next time I visit I will go in again and se if it has changed.

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  • bip_231's Profile Photo

    Gaudi's unfinished cathedral

    by bip_231 Written Feb 26, 2009

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    This building is such an artform. The Segrada Familia is located in the northern part of the city. It's still a building site, and is being completed as per Gaudi's original plans and studies. On site there is a museum housing the sketches and drawings of Gaudi. You can also climb the stairs of the towers in the right side doorway of the Nativity doorway. The view from the top is spectacular!

    Costs €8.00 for admission, but it's well worth visiting, to see a masterpiece in it's making!

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  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    The Sagrada Familia - Barcelonas most famous site

    by easyoar Written Nov 27, 2004

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    The Sagrada Familia

    The Sagrada Familia is one of Antoni Gaudis masterpieces (of which there are many in Barcelona!). This 'church' is thought by many to be a fully functioning church. This is far from the truth. Although building work (which has restarted after many many years of nothing happening) is progressing quickly, there are still only just walls to the building. If you visit, you will find the inside is a building site. How they will finish it has been a matter of some contention, because Antoni Gaudi died many years ago (he was run over by a tram), and when he died, the plans (which were in his head, went with him).

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  • spgood301's Profile Photo

    Best Place to Take Pics...

    by spgood301 Written Dec 26, 2004

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    There's a small park across from La Sagrada Familia where you can take exterior pictures. On the day I visited, there was a local gentleman sitting in the park, advising people like me on the best spots in the park for picture taking.

    A beautiful building, truly a symbol of Barcelona.

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  • atufft's Profile Photo

    Part II: Spire Details

    by atufft Updated May 22, 2007

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    Newest Spire Bell Towers
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    As described in Part I, Gaudi's plans call for 18 spires--one for each of 12 apostles, 4 evangelists, the Virgin Mary, and Jesus Christ. Each spire has atop the symbol of the Christian person for whom it is dedicated. The official website describes the 12 bell towers as between "90 m and 112 m high representing the apostles. At a certain height their rhomboidal shape becomes elliptic. The outline of their upper part evocates the crosier of the bishops, their knot symbolizes the ring, and the end of the bell-tower is a double shield similar to metre, containing a golden cross with the initials of the apostle to whom is dedicated each tower." Between some newer towers are steel bridges.

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  • atufft's Profile Photo

    Part III: Spire Bell Tower Ornamentation

    by atufft Written May 21, 2007

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    Close up of Tower Ornament
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    Up each belltower is a marvelously constructed spiral staircase, a few of which are open to the public. I climbed more than one, and while doing so was able to get greater detail images of the ornamentation of the towers. Gaudi certainly went wild with the advent of portland cement, which is so much stronger than the limestone based mixes of the past. He was able to create whimsical forms and cover them in beautifully glazed tile. The symbolism of these shapes is often explained by Gaudi in his religious visionary writing.

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  • JanPeter74's Profile Photo

    La Sagrada Familia

    by JanPeter74 Updated Sep 30, 2004

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    Sagrada Familia

    The Templo de la Sagrada Familia is Antoni Gaudís masterpiece. Building this neo-gothic cathedral (not to be mixed up with the gothic cathedral in the Barri Gòtic) was started in 1883 but the work still isn't finished. People aim to have the work completed in 2026, 100 years after Gaudí died. The building activities are mostly financed by the income from ticket sales to visitors.

    Even though the Sagrada Familia is a beautiful building already, work is not even close to being finished. The two façades with each 4 towers still only represent the side-entrances. The front as well as the highest towers and dome are still to be constructed. Check the picture at my travelogue for a virtual representation of how the Sagrada Familia might look when finished.

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