Daytrips, Madrid

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    Valle de Los Caidos

    by solopes Updated Dec 27, 2013

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    Valle de los Ca��dos - Spain
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    About one hour north of Madrid a high cross in the mountains of Guadarrama signs the location of this fascist monument to the death of civil war, in a place called Valle de los Caidos. Why not? We must keep good and bad memories.

    Go and have a look, and don't forget, ten kilometers distant Escorial is another kind of religious monument.

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    San Lorenzo de El Escorial

    by Jefie Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    View from the Royal Palace of El Escorial
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    King Felipe II's reign in the 16th century was marked by the rise of Protestantism in Europe. In 1559, the king gave Spanish architect Juan Bautista de Toledo the task of creating a "perpetual home for the Catholic Crown of Spain" that would become "an expression in stone of Catholicism in Spain". It resulted in the construction of the magnificient monastery and royal palace of El Escorial, located in the small town of San Lorenzo de El Escorial, about 50 km away from Madrid. The palace is now open to the public, and it makes for a really great day-trip destination.

    A visit to the palace includes a tour of the royal family's private chambers, the beautiful basilica and stunning library, with its priceless collection of over 40,000 volumes, as well as the Royal Pantheon where, for the last five centuries, the kings and queens of Spain have been buried. As with all Spanish royal palaces, there is also an impressive collection of paintings on display. There's a small but beautiful garden next to the palace, from where you can enjoy a nice view of El Escorial.

    But for the best possible view of the palace and the surrounding village, you need to go to "La Silla de Felipe II" (King Felipe II's chair), located in the beautiful forest of La Herreria (for directions, check out Redang's tips). Legend has it that the king had picked this particular spot to keep an eye on the palace as it was being built. There's indeed a seat carved in stone from where you can enjoy a breathtaking view of the palace and its natural surroundings - truly worth the little detour!

    To get to El Escorial, you can catch a train leaving from Atocha station every 30 minutes, from 6:00 am to 11:00 pm. It takes about 15 minutes to walk from the station to the palace. Opening hours are 10:00 am to 6:00 pm every day (closed on Mondays). Admission: 8 Euros.

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    Aranjuez

    by Jefie Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Royal Palace of Aranjuez
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    I guess we could say that Aranjuez is to Madrid what Versailles is to Paris: back in the 16th century, King Felipe II selected this little town as the new seat of the royal family's country residence. Construction of the Royal Palace of Aranjuez began in 1561 following the design of Juan Bautista de Toledo and Juan de Herrera, the same architects who were to work on the royal palace and monastery of El Escorial. Along with the palace came the royal gardens and the "Jardin del Principe", a large English-style park.

    The Royal Palace of Aranjuez is now open to the public. I have to admit that the first few rooms are not very impressive, but keep going because it does get better! As much as possible, the rooms have not been altered since the days when Queen Isabel II lived in the palace (mid-19th century). It is possible to walk through the royal family's private appartments and the royal chapel, and a section of the palace is also dedicated to illustrating the daily life of the royal family. Something I thought was really interesting was the collection of wedding dresses that were worn by the present royal family's daughters and daughters-in-law.

    After you're done visiting the palace, it's worth going for a walk around town and perhaps stopping at a restaurant to enjoy the town specialty: strawberries! Of course, one shouldn't leave without walking through the royal gardens, which are open to the public free of charge. The "Jardin del Principe" is very large, but I must admit that I preferred the "Jardin de la Isla" (the one located right next to the palace), with its numerous fountains and french-style gardens and walking paths.

    To get to Aranjuez, you can catch a train leaving from Atocha station every 30 minutes, from 6:00 am to 11:00 pm. It takes about 10 minutes to walk from the train station to the palace. The palace is open from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm every day (closed on Mondays). General admission: 5 Euros.

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    Valle de los Caidos

    by JoseMadrid Updated Aug 2, 2010
    The big cross.

    The Valley of the Fallen (Valle de los Caídos in Spanish) is located in the Sierra de Guadarrama some 8 miles north of El Escorial. It is a complex full of contoversy that was built during Franco's regime. The monument is intended to commemorate all those who died on both sides during the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939). It comprises an underground basilica crowned by a gigantic cross 150 meters tall (supposedly the largest in the world). Dictator Francisco Franco who ruled Spain from 1939 to 1975 is burried inside the basilica.

    Visiting Times:
    October-March: From 10:00 am to 17:00 pm.
    April-September: From 10:00 am to 18:00 pm.
    Mondays closed.

    Entrance fees: 5.00 Euros.
    Funicular railway: 1.50 Euros.
    Wednesdays: Free entrance for EU Citizens.

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    San Lorenzo de el Escorial

    by suvanki Updated Nov 2, 2009
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    VTer Redang (Santi) had arranged a pre Vt Meet for myself and Bijo69 (Birgit) to one of his favourite places.
    Located 45 minutes away from Madrid by bus, this was a great Day Trip!
    to be continued....

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    Daytrip to Chinchon.

    by cachaseiro Written Aug 8, 2009

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    Chinchon.
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    Chinchon is a small town located around 50 kilometers south east of Madrid and a really nice daytrip if you want to gte away from the hustle and bustle of Madrid.
    It´s an old historical town that has a very big main square that is ocasionally used as a bullring and they even have the running of the bulls there once a year.
    There are frequent bus connections between Madrid and Chinchon and the ride takes about an hour.

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    The day I fell in love with Segovia

    by Jefie Updated Aug 26, 2008

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    Cecile near Segovia's famous Roman aqueduct

    I decided to spend my very last day in Spain in the beautiful city of Segovia, and it turned out to be one of the best decisions I've ever made! First, because it made it possible to go with fellow VTer Cecile (CesVT), and we had an amazing time together; second, because it is such a lovely city, it would have been a real shame to leave Spain without seeing it; and third, because after spending a wonderful day soaking in the lively and yet very relaxing atmosphere of Segovia, I don't think I could have handled spending another week in busy & bustling Madrid!! So for a recap of this memorable daytrip, just check out my Segovia travel page!

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    Discover Alcala de Henares!

    by Jefie Written Aug 26, 2008

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    Sancho Panza & Don Quijote in Alcala de Henares

    Alcala de Henares, the birthplace of Miguel de Cervantes, is a small city located only 30 km away from Madrid. For some reason, it doesn't seem to be as popular a daytrip destination as Toledo and Segovia, and yet the city has a lot to offer to those interested in history: the very first Spanish university was founded in Alcala de Henares in 1499, and in 1486, Christopher Columbus first met with Queen Isabella I of Castille in the city's Archbishop's Palace, which also happens to be the birthplace of Queen Catherine of Aragon, King Henry VIII's first wife. So on a rainy Saturday morning, I hopped aboard a train along with fellow VTer Nico (white_smallstar), and we spent an entire day walking around the lovely streets of Alcala de Henares. Want to find out more about this off-the-beaten-path destination? Just check out my Alcala de Henares travel page!

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    A day trip to Toledo

    by Jefie Updated Aug 26, 2008

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    Cervantes welcomes you to Toledo!

    The beautiful historic city of Toledo is one of the most popular daytrip destinations for people visiting Madrid. It's located within an easy 1h train, bus or car ride, and it offers a fantastic medieval atmosphere that is completely different from the one you'll find in Madrid. Since Toledo was at the top of my "daytrip wishlist", I went there with my friend Luis during my first weekend in Spain. I spent a day walking around the city's charming narrow streets, taking in the beauty and history of "The Glory of Spain". For more information, check out my Toledo travel page!

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    Take a Walk on the Manzanares

    by DanielF Updated Jun 16, 2008

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    Madrid lies in the middle of a barren plain with a somewhat inclement climate characterised by cyclic droughts. Nevertheless, thanks to the proximity of the Sierra de Guadarrama, Madrid has no shortage of water. As a matter of fact, Madrid tap water is among the best in Spain.

    Most of that water is collected in reservoirs up in the sierra and then brought into the city through a canal. But Madrid has also a river. A small one, though; a river which has been constantly object of mockery for its scarce and inconstant flow. Even poets like Góngora have compared it with a "donkey pee".

    At its source in the mighty and pristine Guadarrama Range, the Manzanares is a beautiful mountain stream, but as soon as it reaches the city, its course has been tamed and surrounded by express-ways. There are, however, some areas which are pleasant for a stroll, with historic bridges and locks, as well as well-conditioned promenades on the banks. A still on-going ambitious project aims at regenerating the river banks by putting the roads in underground tunnels and substituting them by parks, beaches and sport facilities.

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  • Palace of Aranjuez

    by ger4444 Written Jun 21, 2007

    This palace is build in the 18 th century. it has numorous of chambers in barroque style, such as the Chinese china salon, the mirrorroom and the smokingroom. The palace has a very big garden. the Prince garden with its statues, fontains and trees is very impressive. in the garden you find the sailors house which exposes the boats of the royals.

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  • Chinchon

    by ger4444 Written Jun 21, 2007

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    Plaza Mayor, the mainsquare, has typical castilian houses. it dates from the 16 th century. The church from the same time has a paintingwork by Goya. Also interesting is the Augustin monastery that is transformed in a parador with a patio garden. Outside the town a castle ruin can be visited, splendid views.

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  • the town of Salamanca

    by ger4444 Written Jun 21, 2007

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    The town is situated at the Tormes. The centre is Plaza Mayor, it’s a baroque square where the townhall is situated. Along the building you see houses with arches. The new cathedral is build in the 16 th century. Its gothic with baroque ornaments. It has a small patio and trough the entrance of the chapel you can enter the old cathedral with is a cellar. This old cathedral has a magnificent altar, in gothic-roman style. There are more than 50 paintings above the altar. The university is dating from the 16 th. Century and is situated in front of the both cathedrals. The courtyard is 15 th. Century. In the building you find a senats hall. In Northern of the cathedral there is the monastery de Santa Maria de las Duenas. It has a patio with arches that have capitles in the form of fairy tale animals. The famous Casa de las Conchas is the house with shells. The font is decorated with shells, wapons and decorated windows. Finally, take a look at the Museo Art Nouveau, its building as well as its collection is interesting. Salamanca can be done all by food in one day. the prettiest view on the town you have at the bridge.

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  • Avilla

    by ger4444 Written Jun 21, 2007

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    Avila is a world heritage site. It is famous for its 2,5 km long townwall. Its also known for its excellent roasts and veal T-bones. You have to taste these in a fine restaurant with high province cuisine. The townwalls date back to the middle ages, guarding the town against enemies and epidemics. It has nine gates of which the gate de Alcazar is the most spectacular. The cathedral is gothic style, build into the townwall. Its like a church fortress. The main chapel has a magnificent reredos by Vasco de la Zarza and paintings by Berruguete and Juan de Borgoña. Iglesia de San Juan is a temple build in roman style with gothic elements. The sanctuary is build in renaissance style. The church is a national monument. Avilla looks great at night when the walls are lightened and you have phantasic views over the mountains at sunset.

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  • Santa cruz del Valle de los Caidos

    by ger4444 Written Jun 21, 2007

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    This cross is build in memmory of the ones that died in the civil war. its build on command of Franco. The cross is 150 meters high. in the near of the cross there are graves of some 40.000 fighters from both sides in the civil war. you can go by elevator to the arms of the cross to have a view over the beutifull landscape.

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