Debod Temple, Madrid

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  • Temple of Debod
    Temple of Debod
    by Veroali
  • Madrid - Spain
    Madrid - Spain
    by solopes
  • A lazy afternoon in the Ferraz gardens
    A lazy afternoon in the Ferraz gardens
    by Jefie
  • gwened's Profile Photo

    Temple of Debod

    by gwened Updated Aug 2, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    temple of Debod
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    a gift from Egypt to Spain from the king Adijalamani, for the construction of the dam of Assouan in 1968.
    free admission, and great Egyptian cave mummies art with writings on the walls and all; great for the entire family, and a great park to walk and play.
    This is how to get there
    Metro: stations Plaza de España (línes 3 and 10)and Ventura Rodríguez (líne 3)
    bús: Líne 74 (stops calle Ferraz,in front of temple,and on calle Pintor Rosales), Línes 25, 39, 46, 75, 138 ,and C1 (stop at Cuesta de San Vicente-Cadarso), Línes 3, 44, 133, 148 ,and C2 (stop Plaza de España), and Línes 1, 2, 74 (stop Princesa-Ventura Rodríguez)
    by train: Cercanías RENFE - Estación(station) Príncipe Pío

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    Debod Temple

    by solopes Updated Apr 19, 2013
    Madrid - Spain

    A strange construction near the royal palace, is an Egyptian temple, rebuilt in 1972. It was originally in Aswan, and would be lost due to the dam's construction. UNESCO made an international call to save it (and some other).

    To thank Spain for the cooperation saving Abu Simbel, Egypt offered this temple to Spain in 1968.

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  • Veroali's Profile Photo

    Temple of Debod

    by Veroali Written Jan 20, 2010
    Temple of Debod

    The temple was brought to Spain from Egypt. Before the Assuan dam was built, Egypt had sent the temple to Spain as a gift and also to preserve the ancient egyptian architecture. The temple is probably 2200 years old. We were also inside, where you can see some archeological discoveries.

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  • davidcross's Profile Photo

    Templo de Debod - more than you might think.

    by davidcross Written Oct 30, 2009
    Templo de Debod, Madrid

    If you did not know it was there, you would probably think it was a folly. Actually it is a genuine Egyptian Temple from the second century BCE. it was demolished when the Aswan Dam occupied its site and crated by the Egyptian government. It was then donated to Spain as thanks for their help with the dam.

    Having seen it from the top of a tourist bus, you might well htink there was little point in bothering further. I think you would be wrong. Even when you approach it through the delightful Parque de Este, the 'main' part looks rather smal and insignificant. However it actually contains two floors and there are a large number of inscriptions on stone, which can be illuminated. What's more, it's free!

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    Templo de Debod

    by keeweechic Written Sep 22, 2009

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    The Temple of Debod is a little out of the norm as far as attractions you would expect to find in this city. This is an Egyptian temple and positioned in a east/west alignment. The temple built in the 4th century BC is dedicated to Egyptian gods Isis and Amon. It was originally situated in southern Egypt until a few decades ago. It was brought to Madrid in 1972 and is given with thanks as recognition of Spanish archaeologists who assisted in the rescue of the Nubian temples in threat of flooding by the Aswan Dam.

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    The Temple of Debod

    by von.otter Written May 4, 2009

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    The Temple of Debod, Madrid, December 2002

    Originally built 9.3 miles south of Aswan, the Temple of Debod was dismantled stone by stone between 1969 and 1970. The pieces were then shipped to Valencia and then taken by train to Madrid. It was rebuilt in Madrid’s Parque de Rosales, near Palacio Real, and opened to the public in 1972.

    When construction of the Great Dam at Aswan in 1960 threatened monuments and historical sites downstream, UNESCO appealed to member countries to save Egypt’s rich archeological heritage. To show its gratitude for Spain’s help saving the temples of Abu Simbel, the Egyptian government made a gift of the Temple of Debod to Spain in 1968. The temple is one of the few works of ancient Egyptian architecture outside Egypt and the only one of its kind in Spain.

    The temple was part of the great religious center dedicated to the goddess Isis in southern Egypt. Begun in the early second century BC as a small single room chapel dedicated to the god Amun, it was extended to form a small temple during the Ptolemaic dynasty and dedicated to Isis of Philae. The Roman emperors Augustus and Tiberius completed its decorations.

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    Templo de Debod

    by MM212 Updated May 1, 2009

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    Located in the middle of the picturesque Parque de la Montaña, the 2nd century BC Egyptian Temple of Debod has been in Madrid since 1972. Egypt gave it to Spain as a gift in 1968 as a sign of gratitute for the help provided in saving the Temple of Abu Simbel from submersion after the Aswan High Dam was built. The Temple of Debod was disassembled and transported to Spain where it was rebuilt in its current location. The interior contains preserved wall hieroglyphs and exhibit with miniatures showing where the temple originally resided. The actual Parque de la Montaña has strategic views over Campo de Moro, Catedral de la Almudena, Palacio Real and Plaza de España.

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    Temple of Debod

    by Jefie Written May 13, 2008

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    A lazy afternoon in the Ferraz gardens
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    Just like the Temple of Dendur, which can now be seen at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, the Temple of Debod was a gift from Egypt to thank Spain for its help in preserving several historical monuments and archeological sites when the Great Dam of Aswan was constructed back in the 1960s. Instead of putting it in a museum, however, the goverment of Spain chose to rebuild the temple in a beautiful park overlooking the Casa de Campo. For this reason, most locals and tourists who gather around the temple to soak up the sun in the afternoon or share a few drinks at night don't really go there out of an interest in archeology. The luscious gardens surrounding the temple have simply turned into a fun gathering place for young Madrileños looking forward to unwind after a long day at work or school. So why not join them?!

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  • isolina_it's Profile Photo

    Temple of Debod

    by isolina_it Written Mar 30, 2008

    The first night we spent in Madrid we visited the Templo de Debod.
    It is located at the top of a flight of steps of Parque del Oeste, near Plaza de Espana. It dated back more than 2200 years ago and was shipped to Spain in 1971 (..I think ;P)

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    Debod Temple

    by Urzu Written Jan 12, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I was born in Madrid, and have lived here for many years, but it was only a few months ago that I went to the Debod Temple for the first time! Don't ask me why, it's a place I've wanted to see for a long time, however I never seemed to make it there. The Debod Temple is an Egyptian Temple that was donated to Spain in 1968, as a "thank you" for helping to preserve different temples in Nubia. The temple is situated in the Oeste Park. It might be a nice idea to have a walk around the park as well as visiting the temple. Some time ago I saw online that sometimes in the summer there are concerts (mainly classical) next to the temple, which should be lovely, I know I will check that out for next summer!

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    El Templo de Debod

    by mollymoo0oo0 Updated Jan 6, 2008

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    Tucked away inside El Parque del Oeste is el Templo de Debod, an Egyptian temple which was given to Spain in the late 1960s in thanks for the country´s support in saving la the temples of Nubia, most notably that of Abu Simbel. The temples had been under threat of destruction due to the building of the Aswan Dam.

    Inside the temple there a several small rooms displaying various stones with carved hyrogliphs and other Ancient Egyptian images... on the second level there is a display of a minature model of the islands along the path of the Nile in the lower section (Aswan to Abu Simbel).

    Worth a look, and entrance is free. Opening hours vary though, so make sure you check what they will be for the day of your visit before you arrive disappointed!

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  • barbskie's Profile Photo

    Templo Devod

    by barbskie Written Jul 19, 2007

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    The Temple comes from Egypt given to Spain. This is an authentic temple built B.C. at the village of Devod dedicated to their gods. As Egypt constructed Aswan High Dam, many of the historical monuments were in danger being flooded, so the Spanish engineers helped the Egyptian government to move those monuments to safety areas. One the monuments were donated to Spain in recogniton to their support and was reconstructed in Madrid in the Park of de la Montana, formerly the site of the army barracks.

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  • Templo de Debot

    by ger4444 Written May 19, 2007

    this tempel was build in 4 BC in Egypt. The Egypt government decided to give the Temple to Madrid as a present out of graditude for the spanish efforts spanish engineers took in saving old monuments as they came under water in the river Nile. its one of my favourite spots in Madrid. the temple itself can be entered for a small amount and there is some documentation in the temple to be found. but most of all the temple is situated on a little hill from wich you have great views over the city especially at sunset.

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  • BeChar's Profile Photo

    Temple of Debod

    by BeChar Updated Apr 1, 2007
    Debod Temple

    The temple, dedicated to God Amon and worship Isis, is a gift of Egypt to Spain for collaboration in rescuing archaeological remains which were under waters of the Nile due to the construction of the Aswan dam. The monument was moved stone by stone on the mountain of Principe Pio.

    Tue-Sun: winter: 9.45am-1.45pm / 4.15-6.15pm
    summer: 10am-2pm / 6-8pm
    Sat-Sun: 10am-2pm

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Debod Temple

    by barryg23 Updated Dec 10, 2006
    Debod Temple

    We were returning from lunch at Casa Mingo through the Montana Park when we came across this beautiful old Temple.

    It looks very much out of place at the edge of the park near a busy main road but as one of the few ancient Egyptian sights which can be seen outside Egypt it’s well worth visiting.

    The temple was built in the 2nd century BC in Egypt. It ended up in Madrid in the 1960s during the construction of the Aswan Dam.

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