Royal Palace, Madrid

4.5 out of 5 stars 118 Reviews

Former King's Residence

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  • Royal Palace
    by JuliaMac
  • Royal Palace
    by JuliaMac
  • Royal Palace
    by JuliaMac
  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Gardens

    by solopes Updated Aug 24, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sabatini gardens - Madrid

    Oficcialy the royal residence the palace is only used for state ceremonies, since the royal family lives in Zarzuela, a palace in the outskirts of town.
    We didn't visit it, but could appreciate one the gardens, Sabatini gardens, whose name comes from the architect that designed the stable demolished to build the gardens in 1930.

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  • stevemt's Profile Photo

    Certainly worth a visit - spectacular

    by stevemt Written Oct 26, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    You certainly see how the other side lived visiting here. Spectacular is the word for it.

    The Palace is not used as a residence any more, but some official functions still occur here.

    The cost of the ticket includes a visit to the armoury and the royal pharmacy - both worth visiting.

    NO PHOTOGRAPHY ALLOWED inside

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  • garridogal's Profile Photo

    Madrid's French Palace

    by garridogal Updated Aug 2, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Royal ground fabulousness
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    Madrid's original royal palace was at the site of Retiro Park. It was where the monarchy lived when Spain ruled the world. It was where Velazquez painted his masterpieces. Its architecture featured the square corners with the pointed tops that you can still find all over Madrid. It was truly Madrileño! However, that palace tragically burned, taking with it several masterpieces by Velazquez and Rubens, among other artists.

    The palace was rebuilt in the Western corner of the city and it was designed by a French architect. This is why it looks like a mini Versailles. And although it's still gorgeous, it's more French than Spanish looking.

    I toured this palace at least twice, back when I first visited this city as a girl and then while I was a student here. I'm sure it's still fantastic and I still remember the endless rooms of tapestries. If you can't tour the palace, then walk around it - it's right in the city - and appreciate the beautiful architecture. And, if you're lucky and have a deep blue sky, like we did, then you'll see how it resembles a beautiful butter cream frosting...!

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    A stately and impressive building

    by piglet44 Written Apr 30, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Me and VT member Redang outside the palace at nigh
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    We enjoyed touring the rooms of the Palace and especially the two extra sites at the end the Royal Pharmacy and the Armoury. These were most impressive. The furnished rooms of the Palace are full of wonderful furniture and decor as one would expect, and similar to other places we have visited such as Versailles and Stately Homes in Britain but the Pharmacy was a fascinating peek into the world of Medicine as it was in the past. In the armoury you can see whole sets of armour and knights fully kitted out for battle on horseback and that is a very interesting site. If you have a couple of hours to spare the Royal Palace is very nice.

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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    The King of Spain's "official" residence...

    by Jefie Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    El Palacio Real in Madrid, Spain
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    ...but he doesn't live there anymore so it is now open to the public. Madrid's Royal Palace was built during the 18th century with the idea of bringing to Spain the same sort of oppulence that existed at Versailles. The result was one of Western Europe's largest royal palaces, although the royal family divided its time between several palaces and usually ended up spending only a few months each year in Madrid. In 1962, the royal family moved to Zarzuela, using the Royal Palace only for official functions.

    The visit of the palace gives access to the throne room, the king's private appartments, the very impressive dining room and porcelaine room, and the royal chapel, among other things (again, it was not allowed to take pictures inside the palace, sorry!). All the rooms are richly decorated (though I wouldn't say it is quite as nice as Versailles) and include a vast number of remarkable paintings by Goya, Velazquez, and other classical painters. It is also possible to visit the more or less interesting Real Farmacia, and the Real Armeria, which I found surprisingly impressive. Outside, the palace is beautifully surrounded by the Plaza del Oriente, the Sabatini Gardens, and the Campo del Moro.

    Opening hours are from 9:00 am to 6:00 pm (3:00 pm on Sundays). General admission: 8 Euros.

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    Palacio Real de Madrid (Royal Palace of Madrid)

    by sirgaw Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Entrance to Palace from parade ground
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    A must see attraction when in Madrid - the Royal Palace is huge. Built between 1738 and 1755 and now-a-days the ceremonial home of the Spanish Monarchy.

    Most of the important rooms are open to the public including the throne room, the Gala Dining Hall, Royal Chapel, Billiard Room and many others, however there are other rooms where priceless objects are on display including the Crockery and Crystal Room, The Stradivarius Room and the Instruments Room.

    Entrance price also includes admittance to the Royal Pharmacy and the Royal Armoury. The latter is the highlight where there is an amazing collection of medieval arms and suits of armour for men of wealth and/or class, their sons, horses and even a dogs' armour. Claimed to be one of the largest collections of its type in the world. Allow at least an hour as this section of the Royal Palace, which covers 2 floors.

    Cost 10 Euro, European Seniors discounts. Allow at least 4 hours to visit. Note - disabled access is limited owing to stairs. Security screening at entrance.

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  • lina112's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace

    by lina112 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Royal Palace

    King Felipe V ordered the construction of the palace in 1737 in sustitution of the Old Madrid Alcazar, destroyed by a fire in 1724. Is the biggest royal palace of wester Europe in extension with 135.000 square meters and 2.800 rooms. It was The Kings offcial residence until midd 30, although at present the palace is use to celebrate state ceremonies, the Royal Family live in Palacio de la Zarzuela another one in a quet area outside Madrid.

    Felipe V ordenó la construcción del palacio en 1737 para sustituir al Viejo Alcázar de Madrid, destruido por un incendio en 1724. Es el mayor palacio real de Europa Occidental en extensión, con 135.000 m² y más de 2.800 habitaciones. El Palacio fue la residencia oficial de los Reyes hasta los años 30 del siglo XX, si bien en la actualidad se utiliza únicamente para la celebración de ceremonias de Estado, ya que la Familia Real reside en el Palacio de la Zarzuela.

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  • BeChar's Profile Photo

    Royal palace

    by BeChar Updated Apr 4, 2011
    Royal Palace
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    Kings spent very little time in the royal palace and used to live in other sites (El Escorial, el sitio del Buen Retiro, Aranjuez). It is structured around a square patio with galleries.
    50 (out of 2800!) rooms can be visited. They offer various styles.

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  • Palacio Real

    by pupina Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Madrid Royal Palace

    Only a small part of the palace is still in use nowadays. The rest serves as a museum. One can hire audio guides and go though marvellous rooms which previous Spanish monarchs lived in. There is an astonishing number of timepieces in every room and they are beautiful. There is also the Royal Armouries and the Pharmacy.

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  • lashr1999's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace of Madrid

    by lashr1999 Updated Apr 4, 2011
    Royal Palace Madrid

    The immense palace was built by King Philips V in 1734. Now, it is used for official acts of state as well as special ceremonies. The royal family does not live there anymore. There are over 2000 beautifully decorated room, some walls are even lined in silver and gold. Each room has its own unique style, no two room seem to be done in the same manner. Only 50 of the 2000+ rooms are available to the general public for viewing.

    The Palace is Open:
    Weekdays - 9 AM to 6 PM. Holidays - 9 AM to 3 PM.
    Oct. 1 to March 31 the Palace is Open:
    Weekdays - 9:30 AM to 5 PM. Holidays - 9AM to 2 PM

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    Pushing a wheelchair at the Royal Palace

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    xerox of a picture of the armory
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    I didn't get to see inside the Royal Palace on my first trip. At the time of the second trip I was coordinator for a special interest group (SIG) on horses, so I wanted to visit the Armory of the Royal Palace. We got there just after the time of the last tour because we'd been on a tour out of the city. They gave my mom a wheelchair and let us join the tour in progress (taking us up in an elevator). I got to push. The Palace is very Roccoco and has a lot of rooms and my recollections have a lot of chandeliers and red velvet in them. My mom was glad of the wheelchair. No flash allowed.

    At the end of the tour, we just had time if we hurried to get to the armory before it closed. So I ran, pushing my mom, across the cobblestone courtyard to the armory entrance. We made it, although it was a bumpy trip for my mom. We did also see the pharmacy briefly.

    COST: 9,00 € with a guide 8,00 € without a guide.
    free entry to EU passport holders on Wednesdays

    From 9.30 to 17.00h. (Monday to Saturday)
    From 9.00 to 14.00h. (Sundays and Holydays)

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  • zindara's Profile Photo

    Palacio Real

    by zindara Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Not only the building outside is beutiful. The rooms inside, paintings, furniture are great. The views around the Palace are also worth (during the day and the sunsets).

    Weekdays 09:30-17:00
    Sundays 09:00 - 14:00
    8€

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  • taskeen's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace Practical Tips

    by taskeen Written Dec 2, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    agree with the other comments on seeing the Royal Palace
    We went on a Monday, and before at least 11:30am, the queue was brilliant! We saw it increasing from 12pm, but probably 40 mins -so do get there early, but dont think like 8am or anything!
    Lots to see so budget about 2-3 hours and take it easy :)

    Do check the opening hours on the website

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  • jlanza29's Profile Photo

    As Royal as Royal can get !!!!!

    by jlanza29 Updated Aug 28, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Royal Palace

    The royal palace is beautiful both inside and outside. Admission price is 8 euro's if you are from a former colonial country admission price is waived. You must show your passport to in order to enter for free. Get there as early as possible. We arrived at opening time 8:00 am (right off our flight from the US) and walked right in with no wait, if we would have gotten there at 9:00 am we would have waited at least 2 hours to get in. There is about 20 rooms open inside the palace. You walk at your own pace, photos are not allowed inside and guards will yell at you if you try to take photos. The price of admission also includes the royal armory and pharmacy. The armory is very intresting... it has tons of midevil weapons and armory. As for the pharmacy they have huge jars filled with potions for the remedies to sickness such as colds, fever, etc., quite intresting. Give yourself about 3 hours to see all 3 rooms. The armory and pharmacy are at the side of the palace. WELL WORTH the visit.

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    The Royal Palace - National Patrimony

    by tzuki Written Jul 22, 2010

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    View of the Royal Palace from Plaza de Oriente

    The Bourbons began the work on the Royal Palace after coming to power in the 18th century and it took over 28 years to complete this amazing building which became the residence of many kings such as Charles III, Charles IV, Ferdinand VII and Alfonso XIII.
    Nowadays is only used for official functions.

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