Santiago de Compostela Off The Beaten Path

  • Palacio de Fonseca (Santiago de C., Spain)
    Palacio de Fonseca (Santiago de C.,...
    by Redang
  • Lugo
    Lugo
    by lotharscheer
  • Lugo
    Lugo
    by lotharscheer

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Santiago de Compostela

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    Daytrip to Lugo

    by lotharscheer Updated Oct 1, 2014

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    The town is surrounded by a completly intact roman wall from the 3. century and a big part of the inner city looks still like in the middle ages.
    From Santiago there are buses every 2 hours taking either 1,5 or 2 hours the slower one is more interresting going through small towns along the N-547 and the airport, the faster one along N-634 and the A-6 Motorway.

    Lugo Lugo Lugo
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    • Museum Visits

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    Casa del Deán

    by Redang Updated Nov 4, 2010

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    Built between 1.747 and 1.753, it was used to host the bishops visiting Santiago de Compostela, then, house of the Dean of the Cathedral, and now it's for the Oficiina del Peregrino (Pilgrim's Office).

    Where: Rúa do Vilar, 1

    Leaving the Praza das Platerías, on the left (it's the first building).

    Casa del De��n (Santiago de C., Spain)

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    Odd street names

    by berenices Written Apr 19, 2010

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    Most local streets are named after famous local personages, or in this part of Iberia, saints. But every now and then, one comes across street names which are odd, or downright amusing...certain to leave a smile on your face. In Santiago de Compostela, I saw a few, but this one cracked me up...it says Ruela de Sae se Podes, which means "get out if you can street"...if was of course a dead-end street, short and ending in a high wall! Some witty minor city employee must have had a hell of a good time naming these streets!

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Photography

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  • Redang's Profile Photo

    Capilla y Fuente del Apóstol de la Rúa do Franco

    by Redang Updated Dec 26, 2008

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    Capela e Fonte do Apóstolo (Chapel and Fountain of the Apostle of Franco street).

    Santiago Apostle was beheaded in Jerusalem and his corpse and head were collected by his Disciples Anastasio and Teodoro who brought them by boat to Galicia. After arriving in Iria Flavia and according to legend, the bullocks that carried the remains of Santiago, stopped there to drink water. Nowadays, you can see the fountain.

    Address: Rúa do Franco, 5

    From Praza do Obradoiro, take Rúa do Franco, and just a few metres later and right after Praza de Fonseca, on the left.

    Capilla y Fuente del Ap��stol (Santiago de C., Spa)

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    Convento de San Francisco

    by Redang Written Nov 25, 2008

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    Baroque style, the Convent of San Francisco de Valdediós was founded by St. Francis of Assisi during his visit to Santiago de Compostela in 1.214.

    Address: Costa de San Francisco/Rúa de San Francisco.

    From Praza do Obradoiro, and facing the Catheral, take Rúa de San Francisco on your left and walk for a few minutes.

    Convento de San Francsico (Santiago de C., Spain)

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    Iglesia de Santa María Salomé

    by Redang Written Nov 24, 2008

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    Iglesia de Santa María Salomé (Igrexa de Santa María Salomé/Church of Santa María Salomé) was commissioned by Archbishop Xelmírez in the 12th century. Just the front and a few details are original. It is dedicated to María Salomé, the mother of the Apostle Santiago.

    Where:
    Rúa Nova, 31
    Tel.: (+34) 981 58 41 68

    Iglesia de S.M. Salom�� (Santiago de C., Spain)

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    Museo de las Peregrinaciones

    by Redang Updated Nov 23, 2008

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    The Pilgrimage Museum shows the importance, for European culture and Hispanic America, of the pilgrimage and worship of Santiago.

    * Address:
    Rúa de San Miguel, 4

    - Fax: (+34) 981 58 19 55

    Free entry.

    M de las Peregrinaciones (Santiago de C., Spain) M de las Peregrinaciones (Santiago de C., Spain) M de las Peregrinaciones (Santiago de C., Spain) M de las Peregrinaciones (Santiago de C., Spain) M de las Peregrinaciones (Santiago de C., Spain)

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    Mercado de Abastos/Food Market

    by Redang Updated Nov 22, 2008

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    This Food Market was built in 1.941 where the previous City Market was, and demolished in 1.937. It was the first permanent structure housing the different markets that existed in Compostela those days.

    It offers fresh produce.

    * Where:
    Praza de Abastos/Rúa das Ameas

    * When: Monday to Saturday, 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.

    Mercado de Abastos (Santiago de Compostela, Spain) Mercado de Abastos (Santiago de Compostela, Spain) Mercado de Abastos (Santiago de Compostela, Spain)

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    Gateway of Mazarelos

    by suvanki Updated Sep 11, 2008

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    This gateway is very near to the University Square, it dates back to medieval times, and was the only one remaining from when the city walls were demolished in the 19th century

    This is the gateway where wine barrels were brought into the city

    Walking through the gateway leads to a wide street below, which used to follow the walls

    There are a few bars and cafes nearby

    Gateway of Mazarelos Gateway of Mazarelos
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    • Architecture
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    • Historical Travel

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  • Lydita's Profile Photo

    Watching Santiago from the top of the Cathedral

    by Lydita Updated Aug 21, 2008

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    Visiting the Cathedral roofs is an unforgettable experience and an unique chance to watch Compostela from another point of view... Even though it's quite expensive (10 Euro per person) it includes a guided tour that'll make you discover a part of the Cathedral's history (the expected and the unexpected one).There are special discounts for groups, students, pilgrims and retired people. The timetable is from Tuesday to Sunday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m but it's suggested to reserve the visit in advance. The entrance is in the "Pazo de Xelmirez", on the left side of the Obradoiro facade.

    Cubertas da Catedral Sala de Cerimonias do Pazo de Xelm?rez Claustro da Catedral
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    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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  • angiebabe's Profile Photo

    panoramic views from the public gardens

    by angiebabe Written May 25, 2007

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    Take a walk along the promenade of the Paseo da Ferradua at the end of the lovely street Rua do Franco, which heads away from the cathedral to the south west of the old part, to the lovely public gardens there for excellent views of the Santiago.

    Lovely high trees provide cover while the spacious gardens give an excellent view and overall impression of the whole architectural ensemble.

    looking to the gardens looking to the cathedral
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    • Hiking and Walking
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    Sewers

    by SirRichard Written May 15, 2006

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    I like to photograph town sewers wherever I go. I started doing it in Zanzibar, and since then I discovered some of them are really masterpieces of urban art. This was not particularly beautiful, but anyway here it is.

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    Food market

    by SirRichard Written May 15, 2006

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    The food market, in the south, near the University, is a good place to wander around if tou have some spare time. Apart from the building itself, built up in grey stone, it is interesting to see the wide variety of seafood, and the local peasants selling their goods right there on the floor.

    Pesasnts selling goods
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    • Food and Dining
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  • keltic's Profile Photo

    Ensanche Area

    by keltic Updated Apr 30, 2006

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    Well if you are full of art, and need commercial services, facilities and offers, just cross La Senra and get into the bustling new town. Not really artistic, but is where most high designers shops are. Place for eating, drinking, buying and walking. International boutiques like Benetton, Sissley, Hugo Boss, Pepe Jeans; Geoxx or Lacoste, and plenty of bars and restaurants. Also world famous ZARA everywhere and local designers like Roberto Verino, Antonio Pernas, Adolfo Dominguez, and Purificación Garcia. The best streets are General Pardiñas, Montero Rios, Doctor Teijeiro, Brañas Boulevard and Republica del Salvador. Anyway, the commercial activities are everywhere. Ideal to see local citizens life. The centre of Ensanche is the active RED SQUARE. Circular and mostly pedestrian, has plenty of local life in summer time and terraces of some cafés and bars. There s a funny and modern waterfall coming down Camelia Street. You will find the most posh area at LA ROSA. Lovely garden villas, and place for the well offs to live. The most stunning building is at EL Horreo Street, and its the local regional Parliament of Galicia.
    The Railway station lies at the end of Horreo Street.

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  • jorgejuansanchez's Profile Photo

    Finisterre

    by jorgejuansanchez Written Apr 1, 2006

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    From Santiago you can still walking to Finisterre, (the end of the Earth), in the Atlantic Ocean. It will take 3 more days, about 90 kilometres, and the experience is very intimate.

    When you arrive to Finisterre you have to get to the Kilometro Cero, where there is a Faro (LIghthouse) and burn your clothes symbolizing the death of the old man (or woman!), in order to become a new man with the knowledge that you have acquired during the Camino.

    Kilometro Cero
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    • Religious Travel

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