Monasterio de San Paio de Antealtares, Santiago de Compostela

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  • Monasterio de San Paio de Antealtares
    by Oleg_D.
  • Monasterio de San Paio de Antealtares
    by Oleg_D.
  • Monasterio de San Paio de Antealtares
    by Oleg_D.
  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    General views at monastery

    by Oleg_D. Written Sep 5, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Monastery San Paio de Antealtares was founded here by Alfonso II El Casto the King of Asturia in 830 A.D. The local Benedictine monks supposed to look after recently discovered tomb and relics of Saint James the Apostle. Monastery was dedicated to Sant Paio the child martyr from the city of Cordoba. In 1499 Benedictines left that monastery. Ever since that time monastery belong to the cloistered nuns.
    Although that place has so ancient and long history and in fact this is the oldest local ecclesiastic institution, alas, alas, all buildings of monastery and its church were built in XVII-XVIII century. So, don’t expect to see here the masterpieces of Romanesque and Gothic. This place is waiting for the fans of baroque and classicism. Anyway it is worth to be visited to.
    There is also sacred arts museum in that monastery.
    Admission is free. Visitors are allowed to take non commercial pictures without flash light and tripod.

    Church and sacred art museum are open:
    From April to December:
    Monday-Saturday: 10:30 am-11:30 and 16:00-17:00
    Saturday: church opens 30 min later and closed on Sunday.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Church of San Paio

    by Oleg_D. Written Sep 5, 2013
    4 more images

    That monastery was founded here by Alfonso II El Casto the King of Asturia in 830 A.D. The local Benedictine monks supposed to look after recently discovered tomb and relics of Saint James the Apostle. Monastery was dedicated to Sant Paio the child martyr from the city of Cordoba. In 1499 Benedictines left that monastery. Ever since that time monastery belong to the cloistered nuns.
    Although that place has so ancient and long history and in fact this is the oldest local ecclesiastic institution, alas, alas, all buildings of monastery and its church were built in XVII-XVIII century. So, don’t expect to see here the masterpieces of Romanesque and Gothic. This place is waiting for the fans of baroque and classicism. Anyway it is worth to be visited to.
    There is also sacred arts museum in that monastery.
    Admission is free. Visitors are allowed to take non commercial pictures without flash light and tripod.

    Church and sacred art museum are open:
    From April to December:
    Monday-Saturday: 10:30 am-11:30 and 16:00-17:00
    Saturday: church opens 30 min later and closed on Sunday.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    The Church of San Paio Interior

    by Oleg_D. Written Sep 5, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    That monastery was founded here by Alfonso II El Casto the King of Asturia in 830 A.D. The local Benedictine monks supposed to look after recently discovered tomb and relics of Saint James the Apostle. Monastery was dedicated to Sant Paio the child martyr from the city of Cordoba. In 1499 Benedictines left that monastery. Ever since that time monastery belong to the cloistered nuns.
    Although that place has so ancient and long history and in fact this is the oldest local ecclesiastic institution, alas, alas, all buildings of monastery and its church were built in XVII-XVIII century. So, don’t expect to see here the masterpieces of Romanesque and Gothic. This place is waiting for the fans of baroque and classicism. Anyway it is worth to be visited to.
    There is also sacred arts museum in that monastery.
    Admission is free. Visitors are allowed to take non commercial pictures without flash light and tripod.

    Church and sacred art museum are open:
    From April to December:
    Monday-Saturday: 10:30 am-11:30 and 16:00-17:00
    Saturday: church opens 30 min later and closed on Sunday.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    Mosteiro de San Paio de Antealtares 2

    by suvanki Updated Oct 14, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Convent wall Pz Da Quintana Santiago de Compostela

    The aforementioned Convent (Former Monastery) wall closes one side of Praza Da Quintana, and faces the Cathedral facade with the Holy Door.

    This wall took 45 years to build!
    48 symetrical windows adorn the wall, each having an ironwork grill over, which are sometimes adourned with flowers.

    The stone plaque in the centre of the wall commemorates the forming of the Literary Batallion, when Students and staff from the University banded together to protect Galicia from Napoleons invading troops.

    At the bottom of the wall runs a stone bench, which is a good place to sit and watch the goings-on in the square.

    It was quite peaceful sitting here enjoying the winter sunshine, there weren't too many people here, but I should imagine it gets quite a crowd in Summer.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    Mosteiro de San Paio de Antealtares

    by suvanki Updated Oct 14, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Statue of Saint San Paio, above entrance to Church
    1 more image

    Originally a Benedictine monastery, built by Alfonso 11 to look after the remains of St. James. It was converted to a nunnery in 1499.
    This convent/church has a museum of Sacred Art-admission according to my guide book is £1.50
    Open Mon - Sat 11 - 13.30 or 1400hrs and 1600 - 1900 hrs.

    I didn't get to see the museum, but each night the nuns sing during mass at 19.30 hours, then at about 20.00hrs they chant Benedictine vespers.

    On the Friday night, I arrived at just before 20.00hrs in order to hear the nuns singing. Entering through the door (above which is a stone statue of the child saint San Paio, depicting his throat being slashed in recognition of his martyrdom)! I found that mass was still in progress. (I'm not a Catholic, and wasn't entirely sure of the procedure, so I sat at the back of the church)

    When mass was over - The nuns sang vespers for about 20 minutes. Although I'm not particularly religious, I did find this quite moving, especially as there were only myself and 3 members of the congregation there, so it felt quite atmospheric.

    Earlier in the day, I'd visited an exhibition in the former Bank of Spain, in the Plaza de las Platerias, which was intending to educate the public about the previously hidden lives of the nuns who live in enclosed orders, including the convent of San Paiou.

    Apparently it is possible to purchase cookies, freshly baked by the nuns, from a hatch situated further along the Via Sacra. You enter a small entrance hall through a door which has a carving of the Virgin Mary on a donkey. I'd found this by accident earlier in the day, and had wondered what the revolving cupboard in the wall was for. I'd read somewhere before about mothers abandoning their unwanted babies at convents in similar contraptions, and assumed that it was part of its purpose. When I asked the girl at the Tourist information office, when I was enquiring about the vespers, she neither confirmed or denied this!

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Music
    • Museum Visits

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  • xanaia's Profile Photo

    Monasterio de San Paio de Antealtares

    by xanaia Written Oct 12, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Monasterio de San Paio

    The monastery and church of San Paio de Antealtares dates back to the 9th entury but it was founded in the 11th century by Alfonso II with twelve Benedictine monks in order to look after and render worship to the recently discovered tomb of the Apostle James. The present-day construction belongs almost entirely to the 17th and 18th centuries, since the original one was demolished. One of the sidewalls closes one side of Plaza de la Quintana, with an absolutely sober design based on unadorned walls. In the centre of this wall, a stone plaque commemorates the formation of the Literary Battalion, organized by Compostela´s university students in order to defend Galicia against Napoleon´s troops. At the façade opposite Plaza de la Quintana, we can see the main doorway and, at an angle, the so-called -Puerta de los Carros- (Door of the Carriages). After the Benedictine monks left in 1499, the monastery was occupied by cloistered nuns. The convent was dedicated to St. Palayo, who was martyred as a child in Cordoba. An image of his death dominates the church façade. The church, which has a Greek-cross ground plan, was designed by Fray Gabriel de Casas. The altarpiece of the high altar stands out inside. We can go through the church to enter the Museum of Sacred Art, which houses the original altar that accompanied the apostolic sarcophagus and which was given to the convent by Xelmírez, who replaced it with a more magnificent one inside the Cathedral.

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